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Sector Trend Analysis - Sugar Confectionery In Belgium

January 2017

Sector Trend Analysis - Sugar Confectionery In Belgium (PDF Version, 830KB) | Help with downloadable formats

Contents

Executive summary

This report brings together consumer insight and market data to provide a comprehensive brief of the sugar confectionery sector in Belgium to Canadian exporters. This allows for the rapid identification of key growth opportunities across major sugar confectionery categories. It also provides market share of the key distribution channels. Finaly, the report includes brand share data of the Confectionery market in Belgium.

Currently, imports of sugar confectionery into the European Union (E.U.) face tariffs starting at 6.2%. Canadian sugar confectionery exports will enter the E.U. duty free immediately upon entry into force of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). Under CETA, certain exports of Canadian sugar confectionery will also have access to Origin Quotas (which provide more liberal rules of origin), including an Origin Quota of 10,000 tonnes for Sugar Confectionery and Chocolate Preparations such as bubble gum, sugar candies, and chocolate confectionery.

According to Euromonitor, the Belgian sugar confectionery sector reached US$317.4 million in 2015. This represents 7.9% growth or US$23.1 million since 2010. In the forecast, the sugar confectionery sector is predicted to reach close to US$325.1 million by 2021, with an estimated growth of 1.8%. High growth categories in the forecast include medicated confectionery, mints losanges and pastilles, gums, jellies and chews.   

Consumer attitudes and economic drivers

As in other European countries, the population in Belgium is aging, which is having a major impact on consumption trends. People in Belgium are expected to continue to live longer, while birth rates are expected to continue to decline. Another particularity of the Belgian market is that the number of single-person households is expected to increase.

According to Euromonitor, the purchasing habits of the Belgian consumers are becoming more in line with the rest of European nations, and this is reflected in the increased demand for indulgence and luxury products, including confectionery items.

While pleasure, indulgence and impulse remain key demand drivers for sugar confectionery in Belgium, the importance of on-the-go consumption is paradigm for the sector. Furthermore, smaller portions do not only drive value, they also give manufacturers significant room for innovation and new products introduction.

While manufacturers focus on new launches of sugar-free products, interest in gluten-free sugar confectionery increased in 2016. The gluten-free segment is still a niche; however, it is set to grow rapidly according to Euromonitor.

Retail sales

Sugar confectionery in Belgium saw several new launches in 2015. At the same time, the category's growth potential was negatively affected by increasing health concerns and rising obesity. As a result, sugar confectionery posted only moderate current value growth of 1% in 2015, while volume sales remained flat.

Historic retail value sales of sugar confectionery in Belgium, in US$ millions
Category 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Market Share (%) CAGR (%) 2010-15
Sugar Confectionery (total) 294.3 300.7 307.9 312.5 315.1 317.4 1.5
Pastilles, gums, jellies and chews 106.4 108.9 111.4 113.1 114.0 115.0 36.2 1.6
Mints 45.3 46.9 48.0 49.2 50.1 50.8 16.0 2.3
Medicated confectionery 47.2 47.7 48.8 49.7 50.1 50.5 15.9 1.4
Toffees, caramels and nougat 41.7 42.0 43.1 43.5 43.4 43.4 13.7 0.8
Boiled sweets 25.3 26.5 27.2 27.5 27.8 27.9 8.8 2.0
Other sugar confectionery 19.1 19.4 19.8 19.9 20.0 20.1 6.3 1.0
Lollipops 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 2.5 1.0
Liquorice 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 0.6 0.0
Source: Euromonitor, 2016
Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR)
Historic retail volume sales of sugar confectionery in Belgium, in 000' tonnes
Category 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Sugar Confectionery (total) 29.6 29.5 29.2 29.0 28.8 28.6
Pastilles, gums, jellies and chews 16.3 16.0 15.9 15.8 15.6 15.5
Mints 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.3
Medicated confectionery 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4
Toffees, caramels and nougat 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1
Boiled sweets 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.9
Other sugar confectionery 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7
Lollipops 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6
Liquorice 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Source: Euromonitor, 2016

Euromonitor forecast that the sugar confectionery volume sales are likely to stay static over the 2016 to 2021 period. However, pleasure-seeking and health and wellness products will become increasingly appealing and indicate margin for growth for sugar confectionery, especially in terms of retail value sales.

Forecast retail value sales of sugar confectionery in Belgium, in US$ millions
Category 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Market Share (%) CAGR (%) 2016-21
Sugar Confectionery (total) 319.4 325.3 330.9 337.7 345.9 354.4 100.0 2.1
Pastilles, gums, jellies and chews 115.8 118.0 120.1 122.5 125.5 128.5 36.3 2.1
Mints 51.5 52.7 53.9 55.3 56.9 58.6 16.5 2.6
Medicated confectionery 51.0 52.3 53.6 55.1 56.7 58.3 16.5 2.7
Toffees, caramels and nougat 43.3 43.7 44.0 44.5 45.3 46.2 13.0 1.3
Boiled sweets 28.1 28.6 29.0 29.6 30.3 31.1 8.8 2.0
Other sugar confectionery 20.0 20.2 20.4 20.6 20.9 21.2 6.0 1.2
Lollipops 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.3 8.4 8.6 2.4 1.5
Liquorice 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 0.5 1.1
Source: Euromonitor, 2016
Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR)

While Euromonitor data shows slow volume growth in the Belgian market, the values are still reporting modest growth indicating a move to higher priced products.

Forecast retail volume sales of sugar confectionery in Belgium, in 000' tonnes
Category 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Sugar Confectionery (total) 28.40 28.20 27.90 27.70 27.50 27.40
Pastilles, gums, jellies and chews 15.40 15.30 15.30 15.20 15.10 15.00
Mints 4.20 4.20 4.10 4.10 4.10 4.00
Medicated confectionery 2.40 2.30 2.30 2.30 2.30 2.30
Toffees, caramels and nougat 2.10 2.10 2.10 2.10 2.10 2.10
Boiled sweets 1.90 1.90 1.90 1.90 1.90 1.90
Other sugar confectionery 1.60 1.60 1.60 1.50 1.50 1.50
Lollipops 0.60 0.60 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50
Liquorice 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10
Source: Euromonitor, 2016

Globally, consumers are becoming ever more demanding of their sweets. Belgian consumers want premium indulgence with health benefits. Manufacturers are certainly eager to add value to their products, but while some of their health and wellness-oriented offerings enjoy global appeal, others remain confined to niche markets.

Key functional ingredients historical retail value sales (%) breakdown
Key functional ingredients 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Herb extracts 19.0 18.9 18.9 18.8 18.6 18.5
Multivitamins 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5
Vitamin C 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.6 7.7
Calcium with/without vitamin D 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.4 4.3 4.3
Source: Euromonitor, 2016

New sugar confectionery products in Belgium

From January 2010 to December 2015, there were 286 sugar confectionery new products launched in Belgium. The number of sugar confectionery new product introduction in Belgium has fluctuated over the last five years, and has increased in 2015 to a high of 66 new products. In 2010, 32 new product were launches.

New sugar confectionery products launches by year, from January 2010 to December 2015

New product launches (year)

Source: Mintel Global New Products Database (GNPD), 2016

In 2015, the low/no/reduced allergen and gluten-free claims saw the largest number of new product introductions with ten new products for each claim. The “low/no/reduced sugar”, “age group specific” and “no additives/preservatives” claims includs five new products each. These 5 claims represented 53% of all sugar confectionery launches in 2015.

New sugar confectionery products launches by claim, from January 2010 to December 2015
Claim 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Total new products 32 35 50 54 49 66
Low/no/reduced allergen 4 0 5 0 7 10
Gluten-free 4 0 5 0 6 10
Low/no/reduced sugar 15 18 29 14 11 5
Children (5-12) 4 2 0 2 11 5
No additives/preservatives 2 1 2 2 7 5
Source: Mintel GNPD, 2016

Increasing concerns regarding sugar consumption may have an impact on sugar confectionery. However, sugar-free products, medicated confectionery and mints are expected to grow steadily.

As Belgian consumers become more health-conscious, the development of broader sugar-free offerings will be very important for the success of sugar confectionery. Gluten-free sugar confectionery is also attracting an increasing demand, and represents an interesting growth driver for manufacturers.

When it comes to new flavours and ingredients, Belgian consumers are fairly conservative, traditional flavours remain popular in Belgium, with fruit varieties dominating the market, followed by mint and strawberry.

Top 10 new sugar confectionery products launches by flavour, from January 2010 to December 2015
Flavour 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Fruit 2 3 3 8 9 7
Mint 5 3 8 2 2 5
Strawberry 2 2 6 2 7 6
Orange 0 1 4 4 2 6
Peppermint 1 2 6 1 1 0
Apple 1 0 2 0 3 5
Sour 0 1 1 1 5 2
Multiple Flavour 0 1 1 1 1 6
Cola 0 1 2 1 2 3
Lemon 1 0 2 1 1 4
Source: Mintel GNPD, 2016

The price growth rate has been slow and modest, but remained in positive territory because these products can deliver on indulgency at a modest price.

Historic retail value sales of sugar confectionery in Belgium, unit price in US$ per kilogram
Category 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Medicated confectionery 23.6 23.9 24.7 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4
Mints 23.1 23.4 23.7 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1
Lollipops 13.6 13.7 14.1 14.4 14.6 14.8 14.9
Liquorice 13.4 13.6 14.0 14.2 14.4 14.6 14.8
Other sugar confectionery 10.9 11.2 11.5 11.8 12.0 12.1 12.3
Boiled sweets 11.1 11.3 11.6 11.7 11.9 12.0 12.1
Sugar confectionery 10.0 10.3 10.6 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.3
Toffees, caramels and nougat 9.3 9.3 9.8 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3
Pastilles, gums, jellies and chews 6.6 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5
Source: Euromonitor, 2016

Distribution channels

The purchase of sugar confectionery relies on classic impulse triggers. Almost three out of four consumers admit to buying the sugar confectionery on impulse, thus at the point-of-sale indicating that the product visibility and strategic in-store positioning are paramount.

The internet-retailing channel accounted for just 3% of sugar confectionery's total retail value sales in 2016. However, the importance of the internet-retailing channel is growing rapidly.

Distribution channels of sugar confectionery products by %
Outlets 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Store-Based Retailing 89.6 89.5 89.2 88.9 88.8 88.7
Grocery Retailers 75.3 75.2 74.8 74.4 74.4 74.2
Modern Grocery Retailers (total) 64.3 64.2 64.2 64.0 64.1 64.1
Convenience Stores 6.3 6.2 6.0 5.9 5.9 6.0
Discounters 10.6 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.9 10.9
Forecourt Retailers 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.0 2.9 2.8
Hypermarkets 5.8 5.5 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.1
Supermarkets 38.4 38.7 39.0 39.2 39.3 39.3
Traditional Grocery Retailers (total) 11.1 10.9 10.7 10.4 10.3 10.1
Food/drink/tobacco specialists 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.4
Independent Small Grocers 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.8 4.8 4.7
Other Grocery Retailers 1.5 1.4 1.3 1.1 1.1 1.1
Non-Grocery Specialists (total) 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.4 14.5 14.5
Health and Beauty Specialist Retailers 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.4 14.5 14.5
Mixed Retailers 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Non-Store Retailing (total) 10.4 10.5 10.8 11.1 11.1 11.3
Vending 8.9 8.8 8.8 8.8 8.7 8.6
Internet Retailing 1.5 1.7 2.0 2.3 2.5 2.8
Source: Euromonitor, 2016

New Sugar Confectionery Products Launches by Branded vs Private Label, from January 2010 to December 2015

New product launches (year)

Source: Mintel GNPD, 2016

In Belgium, premium brands strive for innovation with products that are mainly geared to adults and young adults demographics, while value for money brands focus on younger target groups, with products such as lollipops and boiled sweets.

Discounters' private label products, in particular, experienced steady growth in 2015 and projected to increase even more 2016 as their low prices and strong promotions proved to be very attractive to low- to middle-income households according to Mintel.

Example of price point of sugar confectionery products as of February 2016
Category Brands Company name Outlets Pack size Price (Euro) Price (US$)
Boiled Sweets Carrefour Carrefour Belgium SA/NV Supermarket 250 g 1.29 1.44
Boiled Sweets Colruyt Etn Franz Colruyt NV Internet retailing 600 g 3.17 3.55
Boiled Sweets Delhaize Delhaize 'Le Lion' SA Supermarket 120 g 2.19 2.45
Boiled Sweets Fruit-tella Cream Perfetti Van Melle Group Internet retailing 160 g 1.95 2.18
Boiled Sweets Kathy Confiserie Kathy Supermarket 200 g 2.25 2.52
Liquorice Carrefour Carrefour Belgium SA/NV Supermarket 150 g 1.49 1.67
Liquorice Curix Usines Jean Warnimont SA Supermarket 42 units 1.49 1.67
Liquorice Delhaize Delhaize 'Le Lion' SA Supermarket 225 g 1.69 1.89
Liquorice Look-O-Look Réglisse Look-O-Look International BV Supermarket 135 g 1.99 2.23
Lollipops Carrefour Carrefour Belgium SA/NV Supermarket 200 g 1.99 2.23
Lollipops Chupa Chups Chupa Chups (Grupo) SA Supermarket 192 g 1.53 1.71
Lollipops Colruyt Etn Franz Colruyt NV Supermarket 500 g 1.98 2.22
Medicated Confectionery Anta Flu Pervasco BV Supermarket 300 g 2.71 3.04
Medicated Confectionery Ricola Solinest SA Supermarket 50 g 1.70 1.90
Medicated Confectionery Vichy Cadbury Belgium NV Supermarket 125 g 1.69 1.89
Medicated Confectionery Vicks Procter & Gamble Eurocor NV SA Supermarket 75 g 1.85 2.07
Power Mints Delhaize Delhaize 'Le Lion' SA Supermarket 175 g 1.49 1.67
Power Mints Frisk Frisk International NV Supermarket 35 g 2.09 2.34
Power Mints King Extra Strong Lamy Lutti NV Supermarket 4 x 44 g 1.09 1.22
Standard Mints Carrefour Carrefour Belgium SA/NV Supermarket 150 g 1.49 1.67
Standard Mints Delhaize Delhaize 'Le Lion' SA Supermarket 175 g 1.49 1.67
Standard Mints Hartmint Confiserie Trefin NV Supermarket 200 g 1.35 1.51
Pastilles, Gums, Jellies and Chews Aldi Aldi NV/SA Supermarket 250 g 0.99 1.11
Pastilles, Gums, Jellies and Chews Carrefour Carrefour Belgium SA/NV Supermarket 250 g 1.09 1.22
Pastilles, Gums, Jellies and Chews Colruyt Etn Franz Colruyt NV Supermarket 500 g 1.34 1.50
Pastilles, Gums, Jellies and Chews Delhaize Delhaize 'Le Lion' SA Supermarket 250 g 1.69 1.89
Pastilles, Gums, Jellies and Chews Fruit-tella Perfetti Van Melle Group Supermarket 500 g 3.69 4.13
Toffees, Caramels and Nougat Aldi Aldi NV/SA Supermarket 400 g 1.69 1.89
Toffees, Caramels and Nougat Caramel Van Melle Frisk International NV Supermarket 250 g 1.05 1.18
Toffees, Caramels and Nougat Carrefour Carrefour Belgium SA/NV Supermarket 280 g 1.85 2.07
Other Sugar Confectionery Delhaize Delhaize 'Le Lion' SA Supermarket 500 g 1.39 1.56
Other Sugar Confectionery Dulcia Haribo GmbH & Co KG Supermarket 400 g 3.68 4.12
Source: Euromonitor, 2016

New Product Examples

Tariff schedule

Please note: Certain sugar confectionery goods are subject to additional European Union (EU) tariffs determined on the basis of the content of milkfat, milk proteins, sucrose, invert sugar, isoglucose, glucose and/or starch of the products.

Tariffs
HS Code Description Conventional rate of duty (%)
1704 Sugar confectionery (including white chocolate), not containing cocoa
1704 10 Chewing gum, whether or not sugar-coated
1704 10 10 Containing less than 60 % by weight of sucrose (including invert sugar expressed as sucrose) 6,2 + 27,1 €/100 kg/net MAX 17,9
1704 10 90 Containing 60 % or more by weight of sucrose (including invert sugar expressed as sucrose) 6,3 + 30,9 €/100 kg/net MAX 18,2
1704 90 Other
1704 90 10 Liquorice extract containing more than 10 % by weight of sucrose but not containing other added substances 13,4
1704 90 30 White chocolate 9,1 + 45,1 €/100 kg/net MAX 18,9 + 16,5 €/100 kg/net
Other
1704 90 51 Pastes, including marzipan, in immediate packings of a net content of 1 kg or more 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z
1704 90 55 Throat pastilles and cough drops 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z
1704 90 61 Sugar-coated (panned) goods 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z
Other
1704 90 65 Gum confectionery and jelly confectionery, including fruit pastes in the form of sugar confectionery 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z 
1704 90 71 Boiled sweets, whether or not filled 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z
1704 90 75 Toffees, caramels and similar sweets 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z
Other
1704 90 81 Compressed tablets 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z
1704 90 99 Other 9 + EA MAX 18,7 + AD S/Z
Source: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/HTML/?uri=OJ:L:2010:284:FULL&from=EN
Kilogram (kg)
Agricultural component (EA)
Harmonized System (HS)
Additional duties for sugar (AD S/Z)

Conclusion

It is likely that Belgian confectionery sector will continue to be interested in innovative sugar confectionery products with added benefits. More and more Belgian consumers are willing to pay a premium price for quality food with healthy ingredients and especially impulse products, as these consumers are increasingly interested in their health. This makes Belgium a potentially attractive market for Canadian exporters of high-quality sugar confectionery products.

Euromonitor data indicates that opportunities for Canadian confectionery products may reside with products focused on health-related positioning, such as naturalness (organic or no additives and preservatives) and purity (simple and clear ingredient lists with limited or no chemicals added).

For more information

International Trade Commissioners can provide Canadian industry with on-the-ground expertise regarding market potential, current conditions and local business contacts, and are an excellent point of contact for export advice.

For additional intelligence on this and other markets, the complete library of Global Analysis reports can be found under Statistics and Market Information at the following link, arranged by sector and region of interest:

Resources

Sector Trend Analysis: Confectionery in Belgium
Global Analysis Report
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