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Sector Trend Analysis – Fish and seafood trends in Lithuania

July 2019

Executive summary

Lithuania is the thirty-third largest market for fish and seafood in the world with imports valued at US$634 million, and the twelfth largest fish and seafood importer among European Union countries with imports valued at US$443 million in 2018. Sweden and Norway were the top two suppliers to Lithuania, and the top imported products were fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon and frozen cod.

Canada supplied 0.11 tonnes of fish and seafood totalling a value of US$83,252 and was the twenty-eighth largest non-EU supplier of fish and seafood to Lithuania in 2018.

Health awareness and the adoption of healthier lifestyles are developing within Lithuania. The demand for food that promotes health and well-being has increased in recent years and the consumption of fish has had some effect in promoting the perceived benefits of fish consumption.

The forecasted retail sales of fish and seafood are expected to reach US$63.8 million by 2022 and will attain a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.9%.  Fresh fish and seafood are forecasted to account for US$18.6 million in 2022 while chilled and frozen fish and seafood are expected to reach US$35.7 million by 2022.

Lithuania is a moderate consumer of fish and seafood and imports a significant portion of what they consume. Imports from Canada from 2014-2018 are small in comparison to the world's total import value to Lithuania. There is still opportunity for Canada to significantly increase their trade growth of fish and seafood products to Lithuania, especially with the elimination of tariffs under the Canada-Europe Trade Agreement (CETA).

Introduction

Lithuania is a country in Northern Europe and is situated on the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea between Latvia and Russia (Kaliningrad). The Lithuanian coastline is 90km in length and its territorial waters and economic zone within the Baltic Sea measure 7000 squared kilometersFootnote 1 Eurofish International Organization: Developing fisheries and aquaculture in Europe.

The fishing industry represents a component of the various sectors that contributes to Lithuania's trading activity within the European Union. Fish and seafood are significant to the country's economy in general. The fishing industry within Lithuania has a long tradition and plays an important role in the small communities that occupy its coastline. According to Eurofish International Organization: Developing fisheries and aquaculture in EuropeFootnote 1, the sector employs over six thousand full-time workers in the industry consisting of 565 in fisheries, 431 in aquaculture and over five thousand working in fish processing. Marine fisheries represent most of the Lithuanian catch from the Baltic Sea, long-distance ocean and coastal fisheries, followed by aquaculture companies whose common production supply is from within ponds (around 87%) and then fish processing companies, who are important in the industry due to their economic size and employment rate. The products produced within the fish processing companies are for Lithuanian consumption (64%), while the remaining products are for export abroad (36%) [30% to EU countries and 6% to non-EU countries]. Also, most of the material used by fish processing companies in the production of fish products are imported, accounting for 72% of all imports in 2017 and 2018.

Lithuania is the sixteenth most populous country in the EU with 2.8 million inhabitants in 2018. The total spending per capita on fish and seafood in Lithuania was US$141.1 in 2018, accounting for a 7% share of spending.

Trade overview

Lithuania is the thirty-third largest market for fish and seafood in the world with imports valued at US$634 million, and the twelfth largest fish and seafood importer among European Union countries with imports valued at US$443 million in 2018. Canada was the fifteenth largest market in fish and seafood, accounting for 2% of the total world market share.

Top ten fish and seafood markets in the world, in US$ millions, historical
Country 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018 Market share % 2018
World total 142,948.0 129,654.8 136,826.0 149,688.0 154,749.0 2.0 100.0
United States 21,555.6 20,055.0 20,777.5 22,966.0 24,003.4 2.7 15.5
Japan 15,205.7 13,799.2 14,282.8 15,427.4 15,771.9 0.9 10.2
China 8,967.0 8,773.4 9,122.3 11,111.5 14,749.0 13.2 9.5
Spain 6,978.6 6,503.0 7,178.5 8,065.3 8,655.7 5.5 5.6
France 6,781.3 5,942.8 6.356.0 6,903.4 7,132.5 1.3 4.6
Italy 6,123.0 5,575.0 6,198.4 6,621.6 7,075.2 3.7 4.6
Korea 4,373.0 4,451.5 4,728.1 5,210.6 6,060.2 8.5 3.9
Germany 6,118.8 5,278.2 5,752.2 5,905.6 5,984.5 −0.6 3.9
Sweden 4,761.4 4,414.4 5,187.3 4,943.1 5,573.0 4.0 3.6
United Kingdom 4,753.1 4,326.2 4,420.0 4,362.0 4,523.9 −1.2 2.9
Lithuania (33) 510.4 450.0 539.8 576.3 634.0 5.6 0.4

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Top ten fish and seafood markets in the European Union (EU), in US$ millions, historical
Country 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018 Market share % 2018
EU (28 member states) total 22,891.7 20,469.2 23,004.2 24,454.8 25,239.9 2.5 100.0
Italy 3,587.2 3,366.4 3,764.1 4,013.6 4,276.9 4.5 16.9
Germany 2,977.6 2,698.7 2,965.8 3,173.0 3,195.6 1.8 12.7
France 2,740.6 2,430.0 2,613.9 2,885.6 3,033.9 2.6 12.0
Spain 2,101.4 1,973.4 2,187.7 2,374.7 2,505.2 4.5 9.9
Portugal 1,531.3 1,407.0 1,520.4 1,682.0 1,745.2 3.3 6.9
Poland 1,567.0 1,323.0 1,561.1 1,446.1 1,657.3 1.4 6.6
United Kingdom 1,516.9 1,426.0 1,552.3 1,520.5 1,559.0 0.7 6.2
Netherlands 1,075.8 864.0 1,369.8 1,498.9 1,430.9 7.4 5.7
Belgium 1,397.0 1,154.5 1,316.5 1,422.8 1,285.7 −2.1 5.1
Denmark 715.6 583.1 675.6 655.3 619.1 −3.6 2.5
Sweden 514.5 439.9 463.2 481.7 507.0 5.0 2.0
Lithuania (12) 365.1 312.3 380.9 413.9 443.0 −0.4 1.8

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Lithuania has a diverse supply network of fish and seafood products. In 2018, Lithuania's top two suppliers of fish and seafood were Sweden (US$287 million, 39,628 tonnes) and Norway (US$57.8 million, 22,397 tonnes). Canada supplied US$83,252 and 0.11 tonnes of fish and seafood to Lithuania in 2018.

Top ten suppliers of fish and seafood to Lithuania, in US$ millions, historical
Country 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018
World total 510.4 450.0 539.8 576.3 634.0 5.6
Sweden 196.4 199.0 238.4 262.3 287.0 9.9
Norway 52.5 51.1 52.5 65.5 57.8 2.4
Russia 7.8 16.2 32.4 29.1 41.7 52.0
United States 24.0 25.5 21.5 24.0 50.0 14.4
Latvia 32.0 28.6 31.7 33.6 37.6 4.5
Germany 48.5 22.8 52.0 46.3 36.1 −7.1
Poland 12.7 13.4 10.9 13.8 18.8 10.2
Estonia 18.4 8.5 9.8 11.8 14.3 −6.2
United Kingdom 13.8 4.5 3.7 7.3 11.6 −4.2
Spain 11.9 9.5 8.9 11.3 11.4 −1.1
Canada (45) 0.7 0.3 0.2 0.6 0.083 −40.8

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Top ten suppliers of fish and seafood to Lithuania, volume measured in tonnes, historical
Country 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018
World total 150,372 142,746 148,189 152,922 154,985 0.8
Sweden 30,958 37,615 37,755 37,754 39,628 6.4
Norway 22,912 22,941 22,183 25,403 22,397 −0.6
Latvia 17,577 18,526 17,380 19,159 17,360 −0.3
United States 9,851 9,376 7,707 8,936 12,136 5.4
Russia 2,029 4,301 9,250 7,514 9,039 45.3
Estonia 9,379 5,418 6,457 9,021 7,601 −5.1
Poland 4,379 4,914 3,789 4,822 6,855 11.9
Germany 11,592 6,890 7,326 7,241 5,139 −18.4
Spain 4,510 4,048 3,850 4,934 4,752 1.3
United Kingdom 7,468 2,767 1,851 2,906 4,642 −-11.2
Canada (55) 374 158 46 195 0.11 −86.9

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

The top imported products to Lithuania in 2018 were fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon, worth US$289.9 million, followed by frozen cod, worth US$56.3 million. Imports of both frozen sockeye salmon and frozen fillets of Pacific salmon increased significantly from 2014 to 2018, along with frozen coalfish in general.

Top ten fish and seafood imports to Lithuania by Harmonized System (HS) code, in US$ millions, historical
HS code Description 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018
Total 510.4 449.7 539.8 576.3 633.6 6.0
030214 Fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon 204.9 191.7 274.4 296.9 289.9 9.0
030363 Frozen cod 35.4 37.0 59.2 60.2 56.3 12.0
030489 Frozen fish fillets, n.e.s.[1] 23.6 16.7 18.5 19.9 26.0 2.0
030495 Frozen meat, whether or not minced, of fish 6.1 14.7 5.9 11.4 18.7 32.0
030354 Frozen mackerel 20.2 11.7 11.9 14.0 16.3 −5.0
030311 Frozen sockeye salmon .123 .705 .707 3.0 14.4 228.0
030365 Frozen coalfish 3.8 11.9 7.5 8.3 13.1 36.0
030499 Frozen fish meat n.e.s.[1] 23.4 19.0 21.6 16.0 12.5 −14.0
030481 Frozen fillets of Pacific salmon 1.5 4.5 4.6 2.7 12.2 70.0
160420 Prepared or preserved fish 11.2 6.6 7.7 9.2 10.3 −2.0

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

1: nowhere else specified

Top ten fish and seafood Lithuania imports by product type, in 2018 in US$ millions

1. Sweden
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030214 Fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 257.5
030363 Fresh cod 5.8
030481 Frozen fillets of Pacific salmon 5.0
030211 Fresh or chilled trout 4.9
030365 Frozen coalfish 3.5
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019
2. Norway
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030363 Fresh cod 18.2
030365 Frozen coalfish 9.4
030481 Frozen fillets of Pacific salmon 5.7
030214 Fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 5.2
030486 Frozen fillets of herring 4.9
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019
3. Russia
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030363 Fresh cod 26.9
030489 Frozen fish fillets, n.e.s.[1] 13.5
160420 Prepared or preserved fish .593
030471 Cod of frozen millets .479
030474 Frozen fillets of hake .59

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

1: nowhere else specified

4. United States
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030495 Frozen meat, whether or not minced, of fish 18.4
030311 Frozen sockeye salmon (red salmon) 13.7
030494 Frozen meat, whether or not minced, of Alaska pollack 7.8
030391 Frozen fish livers, roes and milt 0.6
030312 Frozen Pacific salmon (excluding sockeye salmon "red salmon") 0.4
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019
5. Latvia
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030441 Fresh or chilled fillets of Pacific, Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 5.5
030214 Fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 3.9
160413 Prepared or preserved sardines, sardinella and brisling or sprats, whole or in pieces (excluding minced) 3.1
160414 Prepared or preserved tunas, skipjack and Atlantic bonito, whole or in pieces (excluding minced) 1.7
030389 Frozen fish, n.e.s.[1] 1.6

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

1: nowhere else specified

6. Germany
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030214 Fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 19.3
030471 Cod of frozen millets 3.0
030561 Herring (clupea harengus, clupea pallasii), only salted or in brine (excluding fillets and offal) 1.7
030541 Smoked Pacific salmon, Atlantic salmon, inclusive 1.5
030520 Fish livers, roes and milt, dried, smoked, salted or in brine 1.4
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019
7. Poland
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030363 Frozen cod 2.1
030442 Fresh or chilled fillets of trout 1.4
051191 Products of fish or crustaceans, molluscs, unfit for human consumption 1.2
160420 Prepared or preserved fish (excluding whole or in pieces) 1.2
03441 Fresh or chilled fillets of Pacific, Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 1.1

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

1: nowhere else specified

8. Estonia
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
160420 Prepared or preserved fish (excluding whole or in pieces) 5.9
160419 Prepared or preserved fish, whole or in pieces 2.8
030441 Fresh or chilled fillets of Pacific, Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 1.3
030214 Fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 1.0
030353 Frozen sardines 0.6
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019
9. United Kingdom
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030354 Frozen mackerel 5.7
030214 Fresh or chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 1.0
130231 Agar-agar, whether or not modified 0.8
030211 Fresh or chilled trout 0.7
160300 Extracts and juices of meat, fish or crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic invertebrates 0.6
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019
10. Spain
HS Code Top 5 products 2018
030366 Frozen hake 5.3
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns (excluding cold-water shrimps and prawns 1.4
030369 Frozen fish, (excluding cod, haddock, coalfish, hake, Alaska pollack and black frozen fish, n.e.s.[1] 0.9
030389 Frozen fish, n.e.s.[1] 0.6
160414 Prepared or preserved tunas, skipjack and Atlantic bonito, whole or in pieces (excluding minced) 0.5
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

Canada's performance

Lithuanian imports of fish and seafood products from Canada between 2013 to 2017 was not extensively measurable. In 2018, Lithuania imported US$83,252 and 0.11 tonnes of fish and seafood products directly from Canada, however these numbers do not fully account for all the Canadian seafood products provided through other larger EU countries. According to industry sources (cited in Euromonitor International, 2018) Lithuania has very limited sourcing of local seafood with the vast majority of products being imported.Footnote 2 Lithuania's top three imports of fish and seafood products from Canada were live, products of fish or crustaceans, molluscs or other aquatic invertebrates (US$83,211, 0.055 tonnes); coral and similar materials, shells of molluscs, crustaceans or echinoderms (US$24.00, 0.005 tonnes); and frozen fish fillets, n.e.s (US$17.00, 0.050 tonnes).

Lithuania's top 3 fish and seafood imports from Canada, in US$ and volume (tonnes) in 2018
HS code Description 2018 (US$) 2018 (tonnes)
Total 83,252 0.11
051191 Products of fish or crustaceans, molluscs or other aquatic invertebrates 83,211 0.055
050800 Coral and similar materials, shells of molluscs, crustaceans or echinoderms 24.0 0.005
030489 Frozen fish fillets, n.e.s. (nowhere else specified) 17.0 0.050

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Overall consumer trends

Lithuania is experiencing a decline in its population due to the rising emigration level of its younger generation (18 to 29 year olds) in pursuit of employment and greater opportunities, despite Lithuania's recent falling unemployment rate and improved economic conditions. The recent rise in emigration was originally thought to be due to those wanting to avoid a new health insurance tax, as well as those looking to migrate to the United Kingdom prior to the implementation of Brexit. However; other than greater employment opportunities, other factors such as income inequality, insecurity in retirement, social exclusion and a lack of strong cultural identity have also been cited as reasons for the exodus of Lithuanian's youth,Footnote 2 (Euromonitor International 2018). Nonetheless, a growing economy and faster wage growth has spurred consumer confidence, yet, price remains a main factor when consumers are considering a purchase.

E-commerce is emerging, though considered relatively new in its usage, while cross-border shopping mainly to Poland and Latvia for greater deals, is increasing. A 2017 SwedBank survey for Delfi revealed that the vast majority of respondents (95%), said they mainly buy food when they go to Poland, where certain products benefit from a preferential 8% value-added tax (VAT) rate. This trend has impacted tourism with outbound trips to Poland and Latvia increasing by 40% and 67%, respectively from 2012 to 2017Footnote 2, (Euromonitor International 2018).

Young adults aged 18 to 29, having been raised in the post era of Soviet control; tend to have a more global outlook in comparison to their parents which has led to an increase towards a propensity for international foods and brands. In contrast, Generation X aged 35 to 54, prefer domestic over foreign brands and are interested in sustainability and other green issues. They support companies that promote cultural events or the environment and are willing to pay more for products whose packaging is recycled and/or reused. Mid-lifers aged 45 to 64 and later-lifers aged 65 to 79, are more conservative and prefer domestic brands, especially as later-lifers who lived under Soviet rule, were accustomed to rationing, nationalised property and travel restrictionsFootnote 2, (Euromonitor International 2018).

Lithuanian food consumption is varied with younger Lithuanians favouring International cuisine, while older generations prefer traditional cuisine including "zeppelins"Footnote 3, cold soups, salted herring and pancakes. Lithuanian's prefer freshness (63%) and healthiness (25%) when buying food. A 2017 survey of cooking habits revealed that 95% made dinner meals at home as a healthier and cheaper alternative to eating out and to spend more quality time with family. Similarly, higher incomes and convenience have driven demand for ready meals and eating out.

Health awareness and healthier lifestyles are gaining traction within Lithuania. The demand for food that promotes health and well-being has increased in recent years and the consumption of fish has had some effect in promoting the perceived benefits of fish consumption. Spending on health goods and medical services has improved by 36% recently, as life expectancy for men and women are 63 and 71 years old, respectively. Alcohol consumption paired with a fondness for foods and drinks high in saturated fats and sugars have in part, contributed to more than half of all Lithuanian deaths due to heart disease and physical inactivity that has contributed to greater obesity rates. (Euromonitor International, 2018)

As seen in the chart below, Lithuanians consume more meat than fish and seafood products. The percentage share of spending and spending per capita on meat is significantly higher in both historic and forecasted periods in relation to fish and seafood consumption. However, the forecasted CAGR for the percentage share of spending on fish and seafood is expected to align more closely to the forecasted growth rate of percentage spending on meat by 2023.

Historic and forecast per capita expenditure on fish and seafood in Lithuania, in US$
Category 2014 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018 2019 2023 CAGR* % 2019-2023
% share of spending on fish and seafood 5.7 6.9 4.9 7.3 8.7 4.5
% share of spending on meat 26.8 32.2 4.7 34.1 40.9 4.7
Spending on fish and seafood per capita (US$) 112.1 141.1 5.9 150.4 183.4 5.1
Spending on meat per capita (US$) 523.6 658.5 5.9 702.2 858.8 5.2

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Retail sales

Lithuanians consume predominantly more meat than seafood in their daily diets. In 2018, both processed meat and seafood grew in both retail value and volume terms which may be attributable to varying factors such as increasing urbanisation, in addition to rising disposable incomes within Lithuania.

The growth dynamic of the fish and seafood category can be categorized by the demand for fresh and chilled (both processed and whole cuts) processed seafood versus the availability of shelf stable and dried seafood which are perceived as consisting of high levels of varying preservatives. As cited earlier, Lithuania has very limited sourcing of local seafood with the vast majority of products being imported. Consumers tend to perceive imported frozen seafood as less risky considering it has to be imported from quite distant producers. However; Lithuanians still enjoy consuming fresh and chilled fish when available, over shelf stable or dried, even though its quantity is limited. Consumer preference for chilled and fresh products is attributable to the perception that these products are of better quality, healthier and of higher nutritional value and have greater flavour than shelf stable or dried. Retail sales of fresh and chilled raw packaged fish and seafood (both processed and whole cuts) accounted for 76% of total retail sales of fish and seafood in 2018.

The forecasted retail sales of fish and seafood are expected to reach US$63.8 million by 2022 and is forecast to attain a CAGR of 6.9%. Fresh fish and seafood is forecasted to account for US$18.6 million in 2022, while more popular categories such as chilled and frozen fish and seafood is expected to reach a combined total of US$35.7 million by 2022. The growing awareness of the health benefits associated with consuming fish and seafood (omega 3 fatty acids, rich in phosphorus and protein) propagated by nutritionists via mass media, paired with increasing disposable incomes and growing demand, will assist in increasing Lithuanian's future consumption of fish and seafood.

Retail sales of fish and seafood in Lithuania, US$ millions, historic and forecast
Category 2015 2018 CAGR* % 2015-2018 2019 2022 CAGR* % 2019-2022
Total fish and seafood 43.5 49.8 4.6 52.2 63.8 6.9
Shelf stable fish and seafood 4.1 4.6 3.9 4.8 5.8 6.5
Chilled raw packaged fish and seafood - processed 11.4 13.0 4.5 13.4 16.1 6.3
Chilled raw packaged fish and seafood - whole cuts 9.2 10.7 5.2 11.2 14.0 7.7
Dried fish and seafood 2.6 2.9 3.7 3.1 3.7 6.1
Fresh fish and seafood 12.4 14.3 4.9 15.1 18.6 7.2
Frozen fish and seafood 3.8 4.3 4.2 4.6 5.6 6.8

Source: Global Data, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

The historic and forecasted volume sales of fish and seafood highlight once again, the preference of consumption of fresh and chilled/frozen fish and seafood in comparison to shelf stable and dried fish and seafood consumption to Lithuanians. In 2018, fresh, chilled and frozen fish and seafood accounted for 82.5% of total volume sales of fish and seafood compared to 17.5% of total volume sales of shelf stable and dried fish and seafood in 2018. The retail sales are forecasted to attain a portion of 85.1% and 14.9% respectively by 2022.

Retail sales of fish and seafood in Lithuania in '000 tonnes, historic and forecast
Category 2015 2018 CAGR* % 2015-2018 2019 2022 CAGR* % 2019-2022
Total fish and seafood 7,820 8,440 3.0 8,630 9,640 4.0
Shelf stable fish and seafood 680 720 2.0 740 800 3.0
Chilled raw packaged fish and seafood - processed 1,030 1,090 2.0 1,110 1,210 3.0
Chilled raw packaged fish and seafood - whole cuts 950 1,030 3.0 1,060 1,200 4.0
Dried fish and seafood 710 760 2.0 770 850 3.0
Fresh fish and seafood 3,630 3,950 3.0 4,040 4,550 4.0
Frozen fish and seafood 820 890 3.0 910 1,030 4.0

Source: Global Data, 2019

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Market concentration by company

Lithuania's processed meat and fish and seafood market is led by Biovela UAB that predominantly offers two main brands, Biovela and Utenos Mesa which cover the processed meat category. The company attributes its success to a wide range of products that target differing consumer segments, as well as having a strong distribution network and an explicit marketing strategy. In relation to Lithuania's fish and seafood market, Viciunai & Ko Uab maintained its leading position in processed seafood in 2018. The company offers diverse brands including three major brands, Vici, Esva and Columbus. Vici benefits from its longevity on retailers' shelves supported by brand awareness, various marketing activities in addition to price promotions. Esva and Columbus offer lower unit prices and can target lower-income consumers. Viciunai & Ko Uab make significant investments in advancing technologies in seafood processing to ensure safety standards through all processing levels.

Market concentration for processed meat and seafood in Lithuania, by top 5 company % breakdown, based on retail sales value
Company 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018
Biovela UAB 18.9 18.9 19.1 19.0 19.8 1.2
Viciunai & Ko UAB 7.9 8.0 8.5 8.6 8.2 0.9
Krekenavos Agrofirma AB 8.1 8.4 8.6 8.4 8.1 0.0
Nematekas ZUB 8.4 8.4 8.3 7.8 7.6 −2.5
Samsonas UAB 7.5 6.8 6.3 5.4 4.8 −10.6

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Most Lithuanians shop at supermarkets (42.5%), as they provide more convenience, a wider range of products and competitive pricing through promotions and discounts not offered through traditional grocers (representing 21.4%) of the distribution market in 2018. Discounters such as Lidl, representing 6.1% share of the distribution market, are a new concept for shopping and are popular amongst young consumers as they provide low prices and quality private label products. Local markets are still popular as they provide freshness and higher quality products to the consumer.

Distribution (% breakdown) of processed meat and seafood in Lithuania Based on historic total retail sales
Company 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 CAGR* % 2014-2018
Store-based retailing 99.9 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.5 −0.1
Grocery retailers 99.9 99.8 99.7 99.5 99.4 −0.1
Modern grocery retailers 75.0 76.1 76.9 77.4 78.0 1.0
Convenience stores 11.2 11.8 11.8 12.0 12.0 1.7
Discounters 7.6 2.7 5.2 6.1 −5.3
Forecourt retailers 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 3.6
Hypermarkets 15.9 16.3 16.1 16.0 15.8 −0.2
Supermarkets 38.9 46.7 44.9 42.8 42.5 2.2
Traditional grocery 24.9 23.7 22.8 22.2 21.4 −3.7
Independent small 12.2 11.6 11.3 11.1 10.5 −3.7
Other grocery 12.7 12.1 11.5 11.1 11.0 −3.5
Non-store retailing 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 49.5
Internet retailing 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 49.5

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Manufactured product analysis

According to Mintel (2019), Lithuania has manufactured several products containing fish or seafood as an ingredient, sub-category 'fish products' in their markets between June 2013 to February 2019. "Fish products and fish products" includes fresh, frozen, dried, preserved, smoked, or canned fish, shellfish (shrimp/prawns, oysters, mussels, clams, crab, oysters), squid, octopus and lobster. It also includes breaded products that are not positioned as hors d'oeuvres, along with seafood and vegetable mixes. The manufactured products are mainly of the new/variety/range extension and some of the key attributes are ethical-environmentally friendly packaging, ease of use and no additives or preservatives (many products may list more than one claim per package). The top packaging types are tray, skin pack, carton, and flexible stand-up pouch or tub format. Most products manufactured can be categorized under the chilled versus frozen storage types, and most are distributed by supermarkets.

Examples of manufactured products

Seafood Sticks
Source: Mintel, 2019
Company Sainsbury's
Brand Sainsbury's
Category Processed fish, meat and egg products
Country United Kingdom
Country of manufacture Lithuania
Import status Imported product
Date published February 2019
Launch type Relaunch
Price in US dollars 1.72

Sainsbury's Seafood Sticks have been relaunched with an improved recipe, and a new pack. This responsibly sourced product is described as individually wrapped surimi fish protein sticks with water and starch, and now retails in newly designed widely recycled pack containing 16 sticks, and featuring the Certified Sustainable Seafood MSC logo.

Giant Surimi Prawns in Garlic Oil
Source: Mintel, 2019
Company VG Handel
Brand Vici
Category Processed fish, meat and egg products
Country Austria
Country of manufacture Lithuania
Import status Imported product
Date published December 2018
Launch type New packaging
Price in US dollars 3.40

Vici Surimi in Jumbo-Garnelenform in Knoblauch-Öl (Giant Surimi Prawns in Garlic Oil) have been repackaged with a slightly altered design. The MSC certified imitation prawns are made from fish muscle protein and retail in a 320 gram (g) pack with 200g drained weight.

Large Seafood Stick
Source: Mintel, 2019
Company Tesco
Brand Tesco Ready to eat
Category Processed fish, meat and egg products
Country United Kingdom
Country of manufacture Lithuania
Import status Imported product
Date published November 2018
Launch type New variety/range extension
Price in US dollars 0.58

Tesco Ready to Eat Large Seafood Stick is now available. The crab flavoured surimi stick is made with Alaskan Pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) and hake (Merluccius productus) with added water and starches. It is high in protein and retails in a 50g pack, featuring the MSC Certified Sustainable Seafood logo.

Seafood Snack with Cottage Cheese and Dill Filling
Source: Mintel, 2019
Company Plunges Kooperatine Prekyba
Brand Vici
Category Snacks
Country Czech Republic
Country of manufacture Lithuania
Import status Imported product
Date published January 2017
Product source Shopper
Launch type New product
Price in US dollars 1.56

Vici Surimi Rybí Tycinky s Tvarohovou Pomázánkou s Koprem (Seafood Snack with Cottage Cheese and Dill Filling) is a source of protein and is high in unsaturated fats. The product is retailed in a 160g pack.

Conclusion

Lithuania is a moderate consumer of fish and seafood and imports a significant portion of what they consume. Lithuania is the thirty-third largest market for fish and seafood in the world with imports valued at US$634 million in 2018. Imports from Canada from 2013-2017 were not extensively measurable, with moderate import improvements recorded in 2018, however; there is still opportunity for growth, especially with the progressive elimination of tariffs under the Canada-Europe Trade Agreement (CETA). For example, the pre-CETA EU tariff on frozen mackerel was 20%. Elimination of this tariff will allow Canada more access and enhanced export opportunities into the EU market.

For more information

International Trade Commissioners can provide Canadian industry with on-the-ground expertise regarding market potential, current conditions and local business contacts, and are an excellent point of contact for export advice.

For additional intelligence on this and other markets, the complete library of Global Analysis reports can be found on the International agri-food market intelligence page, arranged by region.

For additional information on Seafood Expo Global 2019 in Belgium, please contact:

Ben Berry, Deputy Director
Trade Show Strategy and Delivery
Agriculture and agri-food Canada
ben.berry@canada.ca

Resources

Sector Trend Analysis – Fish and seafood trends in Lithuania
Global Analysis Report

Prepared by: Laurie Bernardi, International Market Research Analyst

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (2019).

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