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Health and wellness series – Pathfinder on global trends in food intolerance related products

June 2018

Executive summary

Increased diagnoses of food sensitivities has given rise to a new and growing market for food intolerance related or "free from" products. Factors impacting food restrictions range from allergies, food intolerances, to lifestyle choices such as derived health benefits, weight management, religious beliefs and/or ethical considerations.

In 2017, the largest sub-category within the "free from" food intolerance category was dairy-free products at 46.0%, representing US$36.2 billion in retail value sales. Its strong competitor in the non-dairy sector, free from lactose category, represented 23.1% in retail sales. This was followed by "free from" gluten, meat and allergens food intolerance related products at sales of 16.2%, 7.4% and 7.3%, respectively.

The top three companies which have the highest global shares of food intolerance related products on the market measured in retail value sales include the Groupe Danone at 6.3%, Hebei Yangyuan Zhihui Beverage Co. Ltd at 5.3% and General Mills inc. at 4.3%. The top global brands in this market include Yangyuan labelled products, Cheerios, Silk, Enfamil and Vitasoy.

Thousands of new products are being developed each year offering more taste and variety to those intolerance or allergy sufferers. According to Mintel, as many as 35,805 new products were launched worldwide in 2017 within the "free from" meat claims, labelled as suitable for "vegan" or "vegetarians". In fact, food intolerance related products are one of the key sectors that have been identified for growth, along with segments such as super-foods, certain ethnic foods, satiety foods and natural foods.

Introduction

Consumers with eating restrictions tend to avoid certain foods for a variety of reasons. Factors impacting food restrictions range from religious beliefs to ethical considerations, to allergies and food intolerances, to health and weight management. In 2009, it was estimated to be over 300 million people who managed special diets worldwide, as a result of food allergies or intolerances, and the number has continued to rise each year. In Euromonitor International's 2013 Global Consumer Trends survey, only 34.3% of respondents indicated that they had no dietary restrictions.Footnote 1 Increased diagnoses of food sensitivities has given rise to a new and growing market for food intolerance or "free from" products, along with increasing the need for stricter labelling and the requirement for fresh and packaged food industries to have a greater awareness to better understand in general the content and origins of their food products. Even health conscious consumers without specific sensitivities are choosing to consume food intolerance products who believe these products are healthier for digestion, such as vegetarians or vegans, those following Kosher or weight loss diets, and children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or autism.

Although food allergies were still fairly rare in 2009, an increasing number of people are becoming prone to them, partially blamed on the high level of pollutants in the air or lack of exposure to bacteria in increasingly ultra-cleaner societies. In the 2017 Global Consumer Trends survey from Euromonitor, 12.6% of online users responded to being allergic or intolerant to certain foods. These survey results have fluctuated between the years of 2011 to 2017, where the number was highest in 2011 at 14.2% claiming to such allergies and/or food intolerance; while in the years of 2013, 2015 and 2016 results fluctuated from 12.8% down to 9.5% and back up to 11.7%, respectively. These results may be a sign of having a different sample of respondents, however there are signs that consumers are over-reacting to fears over nut or milk allergies; demonstrated with the increased ban of the "nut-free" policy within schools and how young mothers choose to purchase hypoallergenic milk formula for their newborn infants before their babies even show any sign of cow's milk allergy.

Awareness and diagnoses of coeliac disease have risen considerably in recent years, where according to the 2017 Global Consumer Trends survey 11.7% of global internet-connected consumers avoid gluten and/or wheat, which is often linked to coeliac disease. More cases of reactions of gluten and lactose intolerance are being reported where in many cases, intolerance to milk and eggs in early childhood can disappear, while the incidence of gluten-intolerance seems to increase with age. Therefore dairy-free products are largely directed at children or young adults between the range of 15-29 years of age, and the main purchasers of gluten-free products are more common amongst older consumers.

In 2009, it was estimated that at least 177 million people worldwide suffered from Type 1 and Type 2 (well-known side effect of obesity) diabetes, where around four million deaths every year are attributable to complications arising from diabetes. In the 2017 Global Consumer Trends survey, 6.1% respond to being diabetic. Companies can easily declare that a product is gluten-free, dairy-free, fat-free, etc., but many manufacturers choose not to state that their product is certified as "safe for diabetics."

Food intolerances, unlike food allergies, do not activate the body's immune system and are therefore more difficult to diagnose. Reactions from food intolerances are likely to be less severe, are often non-specific and wide-ranging, and can take up to three days to appear (genetics are strongly said to play a role in those susceptible to food intolerances). Over-diagnosing is also a common tendency when it comes to food intolerance products, with many consumers now testing specific diets when suffering digestive problems. A growing market niche for companies, is the trend of mothers being very cautious to such tendencies with regard to their newborn infants, where it is common for parents to buy hypoallergenic milk formulas just in case of reactions that can occur with milk products.  

Market sizes

The market expansion of "free from" products has been derived from growing cases of food allergies and/or simply as a lifestyle choice due to increased awareness of the derived health and wellness benefits food intolerance products has introduced over the years. The food intolerance category has been growing steadily since 2013 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.1%. Sales in 2017 totalled US$36.2 billion, and this category is expected to continue to grow over the next five years at an additional CAGR of 7.1%, reaching sales of US$50.7 billion in 2022. This growth is driven by mass market sale increases within all "free from" categories such as "free from" allergens, dairy, gluten, lactose, and meat. However, the category with the slowest growth forecast is within the gluten-free food products, where this category is expected to significantly slow down in growth from its highest five-year historical CAGR of 21.4% to a forecasted CAGR of 8.2%.

In 2017, the largest sub-category of the overall "free from" food intolerance category was dairy-free food products, which accounted for 46.0% of retail value sales. Lactose-free, "free from" meat and "free from" allergens (strictly hypoallergenic milk formula) food products accounted for 23.1%, 7.4% and 7.3%, respectively. Lastly, gluten-free food products accounted for 16.2% of retail sales and were the fastest growing sub-category over the last five years, growing at a CAGR of 21.4%. However, as mentioned this growth rate is not expected to continue over the forecasted period into 2022, as the category is beginning to become saturated and consumers are making other fad health choices. The category is still expected to grow at a CAGR of 8.2%.

Global market sizes of food intolerance related products, historical retail value sales in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* % 2013-2017
"Free from" food intolerance products 27,455.8 29,299.2 32,386.3 34,296.1 36,179.5 7.1
Allergens (HA[1] milk formula only) 1,911.3 2,141.1 2,290.9 2,468.0 2,643.2 8.4
Dairy 15,268.6 15,775.6 16,118.7 16,283.0 16,646.5 2.2
Gluten 2,698.8 3,172.1 4,716.1 5,419.8 5,870.4 21.4
Lactose 5,668.9 6,138.3 6,921.5 7,610.6 8,346.5 10.2
Meat 1,908.2 2,072.2 2,339.1 2,514.7 2,672.9 8.8

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

1: HA = Hypoallergenic

Global food intolerance, category distribution by retail value sales in current prices, 2017
Description of this image follows.
Description of above image

Legend:

  • Allergens: 7.3%
  • Dairy: 46.0%
  • Gluten: 16.2%
  • Lactose: 23.1%
  • Meat: 7.4%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

Global market sizes of food intolerance related products, forecast retail value sales in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 CAGR* % 2018-2022
"Free from" food intolerance products 38,557.2 41,240.9 44,182.8 47,320.9 50,723.9 7.1
Allergens (HA[1] milk formula only) 2,862.2 3,100.5 3,361.7 3,645.6 3,958.4 8.4
Dairy 17,279.1 18,068.7 19,027.9 20,102.2 21,296.0 5.4
Gluten 6,394.9 6,948.2 7,524.7 8,118.5 8,751.2 8.2
Lactose 9,140.1 10,043.8 10,985.5 11,972.7 13,023.9 9.3
Meat 2,880.9 3,079.8 3,283.1 3,481.9 3,694.5 6.4

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

1: HA = Hypoallergenic

In 2017, Groupe Danone claimed 6.3% of all food intolerance related products in retail value sales, followed closely by Hebei Yangyuan Zhihui Beverage Co. Ltd. with 5.3% of retail sales value. The brands found within the top 20 global list produced by the Groupe Danone, includes the Silk brand which was third on the list at 2.6% of sales value and the Alpro brand which was sixth on the list at 1.9% of sales value. Both brands were previously part of the series of products from the WhiteWave Foods Company, which Groupe Danone strategically acquired in 2016. The Hebei Yangyuan Zhihui Beverage Limited Company's top brands are labelled as Yangyuan products, which were first on the top 20 global list at 5.3% of retail sales value. All three product brands mentioned above from both companies are plant-based products; "free from" dairy alternative drinks containing soya milk which are generally offered in low sugar flavours such as almond, coconut, hazelnut or walnut.

Since the Groupe Danone acquired the WhiteWave's business in 2016, the Alpro brand only has 2017 sales data available. This brand offers milk alternative drinks along with chilled desert options, such as a chocolate flavoured soya and hazelnut vegetable dessert. Also well noted is the company General Mills Inc., which claimed third place on the global share list at 4.3% for all food intolerance related products in retail sales while its gluten-free Cheerios brand claimed second place on the global list at sales value of 2.9%.

Top 20 global shares of the food intolerance market by company, historical retail value sales in current prices, % breakdown
Company 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
1. Groupe Danone 1.3 1.3 1.2 1.3 6.3
2. Hebei Yangyuan Zhihui Beverage Co. Ltd 5.7 7.1 7.5 6.2 5.3
3. General Mills Inc 0.9 0.8 3.9 4.4 4.3
4. Nestlé SA 7.1 5.8 4.9 4.5 4.2
5. Reckitt Benckiser Group Plc (RB) 3.0
6. Abbott Laboratories Inc 3.6 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.7
7. Vitasoy International Holdings Ltd 1.4 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.0
8. Inner Mongolia Yili Industrial Group Co Ltd 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.9
9. Coconut Palm Group Co Ltd 2.7 2.6 2.2 2.0 1.7
10. Johnson & Johnson Inc 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6
11. Blue Diamond Growers 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.6
12. Dr Schär AG/SpA 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4
13. Lactalis, Groupe 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4
14. Wanxiang Sannong Co Ltd 1.9 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.3
15. Valio Oy 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1
16. Pinnacle Foods Inc 0.2 0.2 1.0 1.1
17. Post Holdings Inc 0.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.0
18. Coca-Cola Co, The 0.0 0.0 0.8 0.8 1.0
19. Kikkoman Corp 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9
20. Monde Nissin Corp 0.7 0.8 0.8
Source: Euromonitor International, 2018
Top 20 global shares of the food intolerance market by brand name, historical retail sales value in current prices, % breakdown
Brand Company name 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
1. Yangyuan Hebei Yangyuan Zhihui Beverage Co Ltd 5.7 7.1 7.5 6.2 5.3
2. Cheerios General Mills Inc 3.2 3.0 2.9
3. Silk Groupe Danone 2.6
4. Enfamil Reckitt Benckiser Group Plc (RB) 2.5
5. Vitasoy Vitasoy International Holdings Ltd 1.4 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.0
6. Alpro Groupe Danone 1.9
7. Yili Inner Mongolia Yili Industrial Group Co Ltd 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.9
8. Coconut Palm Coconut Palm Group Co Ltd 2.7 2.6 2.2 2.0 1.7
9. Similac Abbott Laboratories Inc 2.3 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.7
10. Lactaid Johnson & Johnson Inc 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6
11. Almond Breeze Blue Diamond Growers 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5
12. Yinlu Nestlé SA 4.0 2.7 2.0 1.6 1.3
13. Schär Dr Schär AG/SpA 0.8 0.9 1.2 1.2 1.3
14. Lolo Wanxiang Sannong Co Ltd 1.9 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.3
15. Nan Nestlé SA 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.2
16. Valio Valio Oy 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0
17. Kibun Kikkoman Corp 0.9 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9
18. Lucky Charms General Mills Inc 0.8 0.8
19. Quorn Monde Nissin Corp 0.7 0.8 0.8
20. Daliyuan Fujian Dali Food Co Ltd 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 0.8
Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

Product example

Hazelnut and chocolate flavoured soya and hazelnut vegetable dessert

Alpro Dessert Moments Source: Mintel, 2018.

Company Groupe Danone or Alpro, Belgium
Brand Alpro Dessert Moments
Sub-category Desserts and ice cream, chilled desserts
Product description Vegan friendly product, plant-based dessert contains 30% less sugar than average dairy dessert creams, prepared with sustainable soya, source of quality soya proteins to help maintain muscles, enriched with calcium and vitamins
Country France
Related claims Low/no/reduced allergen, gluten / GMO / dairy-free
Launch type New product
Date published June 2018
Price in US dollars 1.74

"Free from" allergen (hypoallergenic milk formula) food products

According to Euromonitor International data, this "free from" allergen food product grouping is categorized strictly for global market sizes of companies who make claims of products which are "free from" hypoallergenic (HA) milk formula. Sub-categories under the "free from" HA milk formula category include HA liquid or HA powder milk formula. These sub-categories include all infant nutritional products that are partially hydrolyzed. These products are better tolerated and help to reduce the onset of some allergic symptoms. Products with hypoallergenic milk formula usually have the label 'HA' on the pack and are recommended for high-risk infants of food allergies or asthma and eczema, even before they show any sign of cow's milk allergy.

Food allergies not only arise from dairy but also grains, soy and nuts. According to the Mintel Group Ltd., the main categories diagnosed as food allergens in which human's tend to have an allergic reaction or indigestion issues towards can include milk, eggs, cereal containing gluten, wheat, celery, fish or crustacean shellfish, peanuts or other nuts / tree nuts, sesame seeds, mustard, soybeans, food colouring, and sulphur dioxide / sulphites. Awareness or lack of acceptance to food allergies still remains low in several countries such as Egypt, India and Asian countries.

Retail value sales for HA milk formula products reached US$2.6 billion in 2017, making up 7.3% retail sales value within the food intolerance category. Most of the sales are attributed to the HA powder milk formula sub-category at 97.1% of the total sales within the "free from" allergen grouping. Purchasing the powder milk formula is most likely the more popular choice, as the consumer would prioritize for the cheapest solution over the quicker alternative solution of liquid milk formula. However, the trend of purchasing the liquid HA formula over the powdered HA milk formula is gaining as a priority as its growth rate is forecasted to increase at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 2.6% by 2022. Meanwhile the HA powder milk formula is expected to remain stable at a decreased CAGR of 8.6%. In 2017, demand for "free from" allergen products mainly remained limited to baby food over baby milk formula. None-the-less, the range of available free from packaged food and parents looking for "free from" allergen baby milk formula that caters to infants with specific dietary requirements, is expected to widen to accommodate increasing demand with a forecasted CAGR of 8.4% between the period from 2018 to 2022, within the overall "free from" HA milk formula / allergens category.

Global market sizes of "free from" hypoallergenic milk formula products, historic retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* % 2013-2017
"Free from" allergens products 1,911.3 2,141.1 2,290.9 2,468.0 2,643.2 8.4
HA[1] liquid milk formula 75.3 76.4 76.8 77.3 77.3 0.7
HA[1] powder milk formula 1,836.0 2,064.6 2,214.1 2,390.7 2,566.0 8.7

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

1: HA = Hypoallergenic

Global market sizes of "free from" hypoallergenic milk formula products, forecast retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 CAGR* % 2018-2022
"Free from" allergens products 2,862.2 3,100.5 3,361.7 3,645.6 3,958.4 8.4
HA[1] liquid milk formula 79.1 80.7 82.8 85.0 87.5 2.6
HA[1] powder milk formula 2,783.1 3,019.8 3,278.9 3,560.6 3,870.9 8.6

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

1: HA = Hypoallergenic

According to Mintel, there were 69 powdered milk baby formula products with the claim of "low/no/reduced allergen" launched globally within 2017. Amongst these 69 products, there were 10 products which claimed in the brand label or product description as being hypoallergenic. However, there are many other products which advertise using brand label tactics such as "easily digestible, for special medicinal purposes, low lactose infant formula for special medical purposes, for mild digestion disorder, and for dietary management of cow's milk allergy" etc. The top three global companies in 2017 with launch types as a new product or variety, relaunched or newly packaged that displayed HA claims include Mead Johnson, Nestlé and Abbott Laboratories/Nutrition.

Global brands of new product launches with allergen-free related claims in 2017, (hypoallergenic powdered milk baby formula products)
Company Brand name Country of manufacture Number of products
Mead Johnson Nutramigen LGG / Lipil Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia 4
Nestlé Nestlé Nutrition / Health Science Alfaré, Nestlé Beba HA Netherlands, Germany 3
Abbott Laboratories / Nutrition Abbott Similac Alimentum United States, South Africa 3
Source: Mintel, 2018

Product example

Hypoallergenic formula based on "free from" amino acids for infants and children

Ordesa Blemil Plus Elemental Source: Mintel, 2018.

Company Laboratorios Ordesa
Brand Ordesa Blemil Plus Elemental
Sub-category Baby food, baby formula 0-6 months
Product description HA formula, a dietetic supplement for special medical purposes and specially formulated for children and infants who are allergic to cow's milk protein, multiple food allergies, digestive pathologies. Enriched with DHA omega 3 fatty acids to contribute to normal visual development until the 12th month.
Country Spain
Related claims Low/no/reduced allergen and lactose, "free from" dairy and gluten
Launch type New product
Date published May 2018
Price in US dollars 63.83

In addition, to new product launches for "free from" hypoallergenic milk formula baby food products, a new popular trend within the last few years are the "free from" HA allergen products found within dog and cat food. An example of this trend is the Wanpy dry dog food brand manufactured by the company China Advanced Pet Foods, published by Mintel in May 2018.

"Free from" dairy food products

According to Euromonitor's 2017 Global Consumer Trends survey, 14.1% of consumers try to limit their intake of dairy which has increased from 2015 at 13.2%. The dairy-free claim on packaging can only be captured for "free from" milk and 'non-dairy' products when they are actually "free from" dairy and dairy derivatives. The claim is not captured for products that claim to be "free from" milk fat, milk powder, cow's milk, lactic protein or milk enzymes. This "free from" product category includes plant based alternatives, where Euromonitor International has sub-divided this dairy grouping into several sub-categories: "free from" ice cream alternatives and milk alternatives, organic or non-organic dairy soy milk, other organic or non-organic milk alternatives, soy chilled or shelf stable desserts, and "free from" organic or non-organic soy yogurt.

Retail value sales for "free from" dairy food products reached US$16.6 billion in 2017, making up the largest food intolerance category at 46.0%. "Free from" milk alternatives which includes "free from" dairy soy milk and "free from" other milk alternatives represented the largest segment within this category, accounting altogether for 93.5% of the dairy-free food retail value sales. These sub-categories are expected to continue to grow within this milk alternative grouping at an overall CAGR of 5.1% between 2018 and 2022. However, the other sub-categories "free from" soy chilled / shelf stable and "free from" soy yoghurt are expected to continue to grow at a CAGR of 6.7% and 8.3%, respectively during the same five year period; where organic soy yoghurt will experience a positive CAGR of 7.4%, as opposed to its historic CAGR of negative 2.6%. Interestingly, the "free from" ice cream alternatives segment was amongst one of the highest historic growth rates within this "free from" dairy food category between 2013 and 2017 at a CAGR of 12.9%. Although Australia led the way in developing "free from" ice cream alternatives, it's expected that the United States will take over this sub-category, which is forecasted to remain at a strong growth rate but may fall back down to a CAGR of 9.4% from 2018 to 2022.

Global market sizes of "free from" dairy products, historic retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* % 2013-2017
"Free from" dairy food products 15,268.6 15,775.6 16,118.7 16,283.0 16,646.5 2.2
Ice cream alternatives 215.30 246.60 278.40 312.30 350.30 12.9
Milk alternatives 14,477.3 14,933.7 15,200.9 15,294.3 15,562.8 1.8
Soy milk 5,313.7 5,446.9 5,685.5 5,966.9 6,279.4 4.3
Organic soy milk 514.6 508.6 507.6 539.6 573.0 2.7
Soy milk (excluding organic) 4,799.1 4,938.3 5,177.9 5,427.4 5,706.4 4.4
Other milk alternatives 9,163.6 9,486.8 9,515.4 9,327.4 9,283.4 0.3
Organic other milk alternatives 71.9 85.2 110.5 144.1 172.4 24.4
Other milk alternatives (excluding organic) 9,091.7 9,401.6 9,404.8 9,183.3 9,111.0 0.1
Soy chilled / shelf stable desserts 245.2 251.8 260.9 270.4 284.3 3.8
Soy yoghurt 330.8 343.4 378.6 406.0 449.1 7.9
Organic soy yoghurt 57.2 55.2 48.3 49.1 51.4 −2.6
Soy yoghurt (excluding organic) 273.5 288.2 330.4 356.9 397.7 9.8

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Global market sizes of "free from" dairy products, forecast retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 CAGR* % 2018-2022
"Free from" dairy food products 17,279.1 18,068.7 19,027.9 20,102.2 21,296.0 5.4
Ice cream alternatives 395.8 442.4 488.1 529.0 566.0 9.4
Milk alternatives 16,086.7 16,762.7 17,607.1 18,571.6 19,657.3 5.1
Soy milk 6,629.8 7,015.8 7,419.8 7,844.1 8,289.4 5.7
Organic soy milk 612.5 658.5 705.8 756.0 806.8 7.1
Soy milk (excluding organic) 6,017.3 6,357.3 6,713.9 7,088.0 7,482.6 5.6
Other milk alternatives 9,456.9 9,746.9 10,187.3 10,727.5 11,367.9 4.7
Organic other milk alternatives 202.6 233.6 265.2 299.1 335.6 13.4
Other milk alternatives (excluding organic) 9,254.2 9,513.3 9,922.2 10,428.4 11,032.3 4.5
Soy chilled / shelf stable desserts 303.8 326.0 348.5 370.7 393.8 6.7
Soy yoghurt 492.7 537.6 584.1 630.9 678.9 8.3
Organic soy yoghurt 55.0 59.2 63.5 68.3 73.3 7.4
Soy yoghurt (excluding organic) 437.7 478.4 520.6 562.5 605.7 8.5

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

According to Mintel, there were 4,164 new products launched worldwide in 2017 that claimed that the product was dairy-free. This "free from" dairy market has significantly increased in comparison to 2013, where 1,140 new products were launched worldwide. Amongst the products launched in 2017, 40.4% were new products, 34.1% were new varieties/range extension/formulation and 25.5% had new packaging or were re-launched.

Snack/cereal/energy bars was the most popular sub-category displaying the dairy-free related claims, accounting for 30.8% of the top five new product launches. Plant based drinks within the dairy alternatives sub-category follows closely behind at 27.7% of new products, which also is a reoccurring trend in the top sub-categories amongst the top five global brands. Also among the most popular sub-categories were sweet biscuits/cookies, baking ingredients and mixes and plant based ice cream and frozen yogurt (dairy alternatives). Califia Farms, Thai Coconut and Rebel Kitchen were the top three companies leading the launches of new products with the most popular brands.

Top five global brands of new product launches, displaying dairy-free related claims in 2017
Brand name Top sub-categories Country sold in Number of products
Califia Farms Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives) United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Mexico, Chile 17
Thai Coco Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives) India, Vietnam, Spain, Malaysia, Thailand 17
Rebel Kitchen Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives) France, Ireland, Netherlands, Switzerland, United States 14
Tesco Free From Plant based ice cream and frozen yogurt (dairy alternatives), corn-based snacks Finland, Poland, Slovakia, United Kingdom 13
Ben & Jerry's Plant based ice cream and frozen yogurt (dairy alternatives) Sweden, Denmark, Finland, United Kingdom, Canada 11
Source: Mintel, 2018
Top five sub-categories of new product launches worldwide, displaying dairy-free related claims in 2017
Sub-category Top 5 countries sold in Number of products
Snack/cereal/energy bars United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, Singapore 149
Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives) United Kingdom, United States, India, Malaysia, Canada 134
Sweet biscuits/cookies United States, Italy, Indonesia, Australia, Spain 70
Baking ingredients and mixes United States, Denmark, United Kingdom, Belgium, Australia 67
Plant based ice cream and frozen yogurt (dairy alternatives) Finland, Canada, Denmark, South Africa, Sweden 64
Source: Mintel, 2018

Product example

Unsweetened almond drink

Unsweetened almond drink Source: Mintel, 2018.

Company Califia Farms
Brand Califia Farms
Sub-category Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives)
Product description "Free from" sugar, soy, gluten, dairy, carrageenan and lactose. Non-Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) kosher certified, 100% vegan product low in saturated fats and contains 50% more calcium than milk.
Country United Kingdom, imported from United States
Related claims Low/no/reduced sugar, allergen, lactose and saturated fat. Dairy-free, gluten-free and GMO-free.
Launch type New product
Date published June 2017
Price in US dollars 2.93

"Free from" lactose food products

According to Euromonitor's 2015 Global Consumer Trends survey, 4.8% of respondents report that they are lactose intolerant with many falling between the ages of 15-29 years old range and 86% of these consumers state that this is the major reasoning behind why they avoid or are trying to limit their dairy intake overall. This category has increased, where the number of lactose intolerant respondents was 7.4% in 2017.

"Free from" lactose milk or other powdered dairy product alternatives includes dairy based products to which lactose has been actively removed and is usually not claimed as lactose-free, rather than as "low/no/reduced lactose". Euromonitor International has sub-divided this lactose grouping into several sub-categories: "free from" lactose baby food more specifically special baby milk formula both in liquid and powder state and "free from" lactose dairy within cheese, milk, yoghurt, other dairy and other lactose alternative products. Awareness of lactose intolerance remains limited in Russia, with those suffering from the condition often remaining undiagnosed.

Lactose-free dairy products compete strongly with non-dairy products and the category was by far the largest main sector in retail value terms, with sales reaching US$4.0 billion in 2008. However, the dairy-free food product category has since taken over with retail sales at 46.0% within the food intolerance category, in 2017. Retail value sales for lactose-free food reached US$8.3 billion in 2017, representing the second largest segment within the food intolerance category with retail sale values at 23.1%. Prepared liquid special baby milk formula is expected to increase from its low growth rate of a CAGR of negative 2.4% to a positive CAGR of 0.3%. Overall, this category is expected to continue to steadily grow at a CAGR of 9.3% between 2018 and 2022.

Global market sizes of "free from" lactose food products, historic retail sale values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* % 2013-2017
"Free from" lactose products 5,668.9 6,138.3 6,921.5 7,610.6 8,346.5 10.2
Baby food (special baby milk formula) 1,290.1 1,191.2 1,252.8 1,306.1 1,361.4 1.4
Liquid special baby milk formula 107.1 104.9 102.0 98.3 97.1 −2.4
Powder special baby milk formula 1,183.0 1,086.3 1,150.8 1,207.7 1,264.3 1.7
"Free from" lactose dairy 4,378.9 4,947.1 5,668.7 6,304.5 6,985.1 12.4
Cheese 296.4 332.4 375.7 418.8 466.1 12.0
Milk 2,940.1 3,337.6 3,886.6 4,362.3 4,860.8 13.4
Other dairy 325.0 367.6 396.8 416.4 439.6 7.8
Yoghurt 586.7 647.1 733.9 814.1 896.4 11.2
Other lactose alternatives[1] 230.7 262.4 275.7 292.9 322.2 8.7

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

1: the "free from lactose dairy" sub-category didn't add up to the given total, so the difference was included in "other lactose alternatives" category

Global market sizes of "free from" lactose food products, forecast retail sale values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 CAGR* % 2018-2022
"Free from" lactose products 9,140.1 10,043.8 10,985.5 11,972.7 13,023.9 9.3
Baby food (special baby milk formula) 1,391.2 1,484.9 1,592.5 1,714.3 1,853.6 7.4
Liquid special baby milk formula 96.0 95.6 95.7 96.2 97.3 0.3
Powder special baby milk formula 1,295.2 1,389.3 1,496.8 1,618.0 1,756.3 7.9
"Free from" lactose dairy 7,749.0 8,558.9 9,392.9 10,258.4 11,170.3 9.6
Cheese 520.2 580.2 639.3 700.0 762.0 10.0
Milk 5,425.7 6,018.2 6,631.2 7,264.5 7,937.4 10.0
Other dairy 465.9 495.6 524.9 554.5 583.7 5.8
Yoghurt 981.9 1,073.0 1,165.3 1,263.1 1,362.3 8.5
Other lactose alternatives[1] 355.3 391.9 432.2 476.3 524.9 10.2

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

1: the "free from lactose dairy" sub-category didn't add up to the given total, so the difference was included in "other lactose alternatives" category

According to Mintel, there were 6,189 new products launched worldwide in 2017 that claimed that the product was low/no/reduced lactose. Amongst the products launched, more new varieties/range extension/formulations were introduced at 38.4%, while 34.2% were new products and 27.4% had new packaging or were re-launched.

Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives) was the most popular sub-category displaying the low/no/reduced lactose free related claims, accounting for 30.2% of the top five new product launches category. Snack/cereal/energy bars follows closely behind at 19.4% of the new products launched, which happens to not fall amongst the top five global brand's top sub-categories. Also among the most popular sub-categories were meal replacements and other drinks, meat products and hard \nd semi-hard cheese. Dr. Schär, Alnavit and Lidl were the top three companies leading the launches of new products with the most popular brands.

Top five global brands of new product launches, displaying lactose-free related claims in 2017
Brand name Top sub-categories Top 5 countries sold in Number of products
Schär Bread and bread products, baking ingredients and mixes, cold cereals Turkey, Morocco, Peru, Greece, Netherlands 16
Alnavit Instant pasta, malt and other hot beverages Switzerland, Germany, Croatia, Austria, Czech Republic 15
Vemondo Spoonable yogurt, curd and quark, soft and semi-soft cheese Germany, Poland, Italy 12
Riso Scotti Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives) Peru, Hong Kong, Costa Rica, Denmark, Netherlands 10
Tesco Lactose Free Spoonable yogurt, soft and semi-soft cheese United Kingdom 10
Source: Mintel, 2018
Top five sub-categories of new product launches worldwide, displaying lactose-free related claims in 2017
Sub-category Top 5 countries sold in Number of products
Plant based drinks (dairy alternatives) Czech Republic, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Germany 159
Snack/cereal/energy bars Germany, United States, Brazil, France, Turkey 102
Meal replacements and; other drinks Germany, United States, Finland, Brazil, Norway 93
Meat products Germany, Austria, Finland, Hungary, Italy 91
Hard and semi-hard cheese Germany, Austria, Finland, Italy, Poland 81
Source: Mintel, 2018

Product example

Lactose-free curd

Lactose-free curd Source: Mintel, 2018.

Company Lidl
Brand Vemondo
Sub-category Curd and quark
Product description Lactose-free curd with a low fat content. The product retails in a 200 gram pack
Country Germany
Related claims Low/no/reduced fat, allergen and lactose. Vegetarian product when as a ball format type.
Launch type New product
Date published September 2017
Price in US dollars 0.82

"Free from" gluten food products

According to Euromonitor's 2017 Global Consumer Trends survey, 11.7% of global internet-connected consumers avoid gluten and/or wheat; an increase from 8.7% in 2015. Reasons for gluten avoidance are often linked to coeliac disease, which leads to intestinal damage, or side effects of consumption such as gastrointestinal symptoms, fatigue or headache.

The "free from" gluten claim is used when a food product is stated to be "free from" gluten or certain grain-based proteins. Words associated with this claim within Latin America include celiac/coeliacs, 'suitable for coeliacs or apto para celiacos', 'sin gluten' and 'sin TACC' (Trigo: wheat, Avena: oats, Cebada: barley, Centeno: rye). Argentina passed a law in December of 2009, to enforce that more companies label their products as suitable or not suitable for coeliacs and possibly even to encourage companies to look at their products to consider whether a simple change could in fact make their product gluten free and thereby offer more options on the market to those suffering from the disease. For most countries like in the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has published a final ruling that it is on a voluntary basis whether companies use the term "gluten-free" on food labels.

Euromonitor International has sub-divided this gluten-free grouping into several sub-categories: "free from" gluten dried, other or prepared baby food, "free from" gluten baked goods such as bread and cakes, and "free from" gluten breakfast cereals, pasta, ready meals and sweet biscuits. The retail value sales for "free from" gluten food products reached US$5.9 billion in 2017, representing 16.2% of sales value within the food intolerance category. Overall, this category is expected to become saturated and significantly decrease from a historic CAGR of 21.4% between 2013 and 2017, to a forecasted CAGR of 8.2%. The largest historic sub-category was the "free from" gluten breakfast cereals with a CAGR of 35.5%. This sub-category is expected to have a slower growth rate than the other categories, to a CAGR of 5.2% from 2018 to 2022.

Global market sizes of "free from" gluten food products, historic retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* % 2013-2017
"Free from" gluten food products 2,698.8 3,172.1 4,716.1 5,419.8 5,870.4 21.4
Baby food 226.0 246.5 273.7 298.2 318.0 8.9
Dried baby food 38.6 43.9 46.1 49.1 51.3 7.4
Other baby food 8.7 9.5 10.2 11.5 12.0 8.4
Prepared baby food 178.7 193.1 217.5 237.7 254.7 9.3
Baked goods 825.3 998.8 1,168.5 1,346.7 1,524.9 16.6
Bread 724.7 887.1 1,038.6 1,192.6 1,347.3 16.8
Cakes 100.6 111.7 129.9 154.1 177.6 15.3
Breakfast cereals 689.6 772.8 1,917.3 2,247.9 2,322.5 35.5
Pasta 317.3 426.8 532.7 618.3 712.8 22.4
Ready meals 339.0 372.9 416.3 450.6 486.4 9.4
Sweet biscuits 301.7 354.4 407.6 458.1 505.8 13.8

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Global market sizes of "free from" gluten food products, forecast retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 CAGR* % 2018-2022
"Free from" gluten food products 6,394.9 6,948.2 7,524.7 8,118.5 8,751.2 8.2
Baby food 339.0 363.9 390.1 418.0 447.6 7.2
Dried baby food 55.0 59.0 63.5 68.6 74.1 7.7
Other baby food 12.8 13.7 14.7 15.7 16.7 6.9
Prepared baby food 271.3 291.2 311.9 333.8 356.8 7.1
Baked goods 1,717.3 1,916.9 2,123.2 2,335.7 2,559.3 10.5
Bread 1,511.5 1,687.1 1,869.3 2,058.3 2,259.7 10.6
Cakes 205.8 229.8 254.0 277.4 299.6 9.8
Breakfast cereals 2,436.3 2,560.9 2,696.1 2,834.4 2,979.0 5.2
Pasta 814.9 921.4 1,035.7 1,157.1 1,294.8 12.3
Ready meals 533.5 583.1 631.0 680.1 730.7 8.2
Sweet biscuits 554.0 602.0 648.6 693.2 739.7 7.5

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

According to Mintel, there were 33,306 new products launched worldwide in 2017 that claimed that the product was "free from" gluten. Amongst the products launched, the launch types were fairly evenly distributed where 35.7% were strictly new products, 33.2% were new varieties/range extension/formulations and 31.1% had new packaging or were re-launched.

Snack / cereal / energy bars was the most popular sub-category displaying the gluten free related claims, accounting for 32.1% of the top five new global product launches category. Baking ingredients and mixes follows at 20.1% of the top new products launched. Also among the most popular sub-categories were meat products, fruit snacks and meal replacements and other drinks. Fresh Thyme Farmers Market, Fecularia de Milho Säo José and Tesco were the top three companies leading the launches of new products with the most popular brands.

Top five global brands of new product launches, displaying gluten-free related claims in 2017
Brand name Top sub-categories Top 5 countries sold in Number of products
Fresh Thyme Farmers Market Seasoning, tea, table sauces, fruit, potato snacks, other United States 54
Sanjer Seasonings, baking ingredients and mixes, stuffing, polenta and other side dishes, popcorn Brazil 41
Tesco Free From Sweet biscuits/cookies, bread and bread products, cold cereals, corn-based snacks Slovakia, Finland, Poland, Czech Republic, United Kingdom 34
Ifa Eliges Seasonings, hard and semi-hard cheese, wet soup, boiled sweets Spain 31
Aurovika Hot cereals, stuffing, polenta and other side dishes, bean-based snacks India 25
Source: Mintel, 2018
Top five sub-categories of new product launches worldwide, displaying gluten-free related claims in 2017
Sub-category Top 5 countries sold in Number of products
Snack/cereal/energy bars United States, Germany, United Kingdom, Turkey, Brazil 643
Baking ingredients and mixes Brazil, United States, Germany, India, United Kingdom 403
Meat products Brazil, Italy, United States, Germany, France 345
Fruit snacks Brazil, United States, Germany, United Kingdom, Thailand 334
Meal replacements and other drinks United States, Brazil, United Kingdom, Germany, Canada 281
Source: Mintel, 2018

Product example

Bacon flavored seasoned manioc flour

Bacon flavored seasoned manioc flour Source: Mintel, 2018.

Company Fecularia de Milho Säo José
Brand Sanjer
Sub-category Stuffing, polenta and other side dishes
Product description Bacon flavored seasoned flour ready to use and "free from" gluten. Product contains genetically modified soybean oil and retails in a 250 gram pack with a recipe suggestion.
Country Brazil, not imported
Related claims Gluten-free and low/no/reduced allergen. Ease of use.
Launch type New product
Date published April 2017
Price in US dollars 1.01

"Free from" meat food products

According to Euromonitor's 2015 Global Consumer Trends survey, after carbohydrate-based food eating restrictions (not covered as a main food intolerance category in this report), meat is the second-most avoided food; 23.5% of respondents avoid at least one type of meat, including pork, red meat, fish and/or chicken which has stayed the same in the 2017 survey results. Pork is the leading most restricted meat globally with 16% of respondents avoiding it, followed by 13% who avoid red meat. Reasons for this meat avoidance or added food restriction vary across geographies and are closely linked with religious practices. On the flip side, in 2017 the survey reveals that 23.1% are also trying to increase their protein intake; an increase of 2.9% from 2015.

"Free from" meat substitute food products includes plant based products that are positioned as a replacement of meat based variants. It includes products where meat has been substituted by soy, quorn (mycoprotein), non-soy beans (ie, black bean burgers), wheat gluten, etc. Euromonitor International has sub-divided this "free from" meat product grouping into several sub-categories: "free from" chilled, frozen (soy-based or other frozen) and shelf stable meat substitutes, along with "free from" meat soy based or other ready meals.

According to Euromonitor, meat-free food products reached retail value sales of US$2.7 billion in 2017, representing 7.4% of the market share within the food intolerance category. "Free from" meat products had a CAGR of 8.8% between 2013 and 2017. This category is expected to slightly decline at a five year forecast of a CAGR of 6.4% between 2018 and 2022. The sub-category which will show an increase rather than a slight decrease like the other categories is the "free from" meat ready meals at a forecasted total CAGR of 6.4%.

Global market sizes of "free from" meat food products, historic retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* % 2013-2017
"Free from" meat products 1,908.2 2,072.2 2,339.1 2,514.7 2,672.9 8.8
Meat substitutes 1,523.2 1,675.1 1,919.7 2,073.5 2,211.2 9.8
Chilled meat substitutes 541.6 602.2 685.9 767.0 834.7 11.4
Frozen meat substitutes 890.4 971.3 1,104.6 1,171.3 1,234.5 8.5
Soy-based frozen meat substitutes 484.7 521.8 564.6 602.5 625.3 6.6
Other frozen meat substitutes 405.7 449.5 539.9 568.8 609.1 10.7
Shelf stable meat substitutes 91.3 101.6 129.3 135.3 142.1 11.7
Ready meals 384.9 397.2 419.4 441.2 461.7 4.7
Soy-based ready meals 196.0 202.7 211.4 221.4 230.1 4.1
Other ready meals 189.0 194.5 208.0 219.7 231.6 5.2

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

Global market sizes of "free from" meat food products, forecast retail values in current prices, US$ millions
Category 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 CAGR* % 2018-2022
"Free from" meat products 2,880.9 3,079.8 3,283.1 3,481.9 3,694.5 6.4
Meat substitutes 2,389.1 2,554.9 2,723.9 2,887.5 3,064.3 6.4
Chilled meat substitutes 912.9 986.9 1,059.5 1,132.2 1,206.9 7.2
Frozen meat substitutes 1,326.5 1,411.4 1,500.6 1,583.9 1,678.1 6.1
Soy-based frozen meat substitutes 670.3 712.6 760.6 810.1 868.2 6.7
Other frozen meat substitutes 656.2 698.8 740.0 773.8 809.9 5.4
Shelf stable meat substitutes 149.6 156.7 163.8 171.5 179.3 4.6
Ready meals 491.8 524.8 559.2 594.5 630.2 6.4
Soy-based ready meals 243.9 258.4 273.2 287.9 302.6 5.5
Other ready meals 248.0 266.5 286.0 306.6 327.5 7.2

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR: Compound Annual Growth Rate

According to Mintel, the claims suitable for "vegan/no animal ingredients" and "vegetarian" products, there were 35,805 new products launched worldwide in 2017 that claimed that the product was "free from" animal ingredients or "free from" meat. Note that these claim results are used when a product is indicated for vegetarians, or stated to be made entirely from vegetarian ingredients. The results doesn't include products that isn't indicated on the pack as "vegetarian", nor for products like meat substitutes, soya, or quorn unless it specifically states that it is suitable for "vegetarians" or "made entirely of vegetarian ingredients". In some countries, such as India, the vegetarian claim is conveyed through a "green dot" logo. Amongst the new products launched, the launch types were fairly evenly distributed where 35.7% were strictly new products, 35.6% were new varieties/range extension/formulations and 28.7% had new packaging or were re-launched.

Sweet biscuits or cookies was the most popular sub-category displaying the vegan/no animal ingredients or vegetarian meat-free related claims, accounting for 25.8% within the top five new product launches category. Also among the most popular sub-categories were seasonings, vegetables, snack/cereal/energy bars and baking ingredients and mixes. New Agro Marketing, DM Drogerie Markt and Marks & Spencer were the top three companies leading the launches of new products with the most popular brands.

Top five global brands of new product launches, displaying meat-free related claims in 2017
Brand name Top sub-categories Top 5 countries sold in Number of products
Agro Fresh Food Products Seasonings, vegetables, rice, sucrose India 68
DM Bio Prepared meals, RTD (iced) tea, coffee, vegetable, salads Germany, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, Austria 67
M&S Spirit of Summer Sweet biscuits/cookies, seasonal chocolate, eggs and egg products, dressings and vinegar Ireland, Hong Kong, United Kingdom, France, Czech Republic 51
M&S Seasonal chocolate, cold cereals, popcorn, dairy based ice cream and frozen yogurt Ireland, Hong Kong, Czech Republic, Greece, South Africa 49
Aurovika Hot cereals, stuffing, polenta and other side dishes, noodles, seasonings, bean-based snacks India 47
Source: Mintel, 2018
Top five sub-categories of new product launches worldwide, displaying meat-free related claims in 2017
Sub-category Top 5 countries sold in Number of products
Sweet biscuits/cookies India, Bangladesh, Nigeria, United Kingdom, Taiwan 674
Seasonings India, Nigeria, Canada, South Africa,Taiwan 518
Vegetables India, United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Nigeria 493
Snack/cereal/energy bars Germany, United Kingdom, India, United States, Turkey 491
Baking ingredients and mixes India, United Kingdom, Germany, Sri Lanka, Australia 436
Source: Mintel, 2018

Product example

Sweetcorn & chickpea burgers

Sweetcorn & chickpea burgers Source: Mintel, 2018.

Company Marks & Spencer
Brand M&S Veggie
Sub-category Stuffing, polenta and other side dishes
Product description Comprised of two sweetcorn and chickpea seasoned vegetarian burgers with rice and seasoned with garlic, cumin and coriander. Source of protein.
Country Ireland, manufactured in United Kingdom
Related claims Vegetarian, vegan/no animal ingredients, weight and muscle gain, gluten-free, wholegrain and low/no/reduced allergen.
Launch type New product
Date published November 2017
Price in US dollars 6.04

Opportunities and trends

Conclusion

Over the years, the media and the Internet have played a vital role in spreading information, and raising consumer awareness of food intolerance issues. In some cases food intolerance is thought to have almost become a fad rather than a reality. In fact, food intolerance products are one of the key sectors that have been identified for growth, along with segments such as super-foods, certain ethnic foods, satiety foods and natural foods. Often, there is no actual legislation determining an internationally accepted threshold for manufacturers to declare products "free-from" for allergen foods as an ingredient or gluten-free food labels etc. However, various labeling and consumer protection acts have come into effect over the last fifteen years or so to regulate food labels. None-the-less, voluntary measures are used often by companies now to push the various "free-from" markets. Also, instrumental in pushing these markets has been the ongoing research and technical developments made, which has led to thousands of new products being developed each year offering more taste and variety to those intolerance sufferers.

Most "free from" products are available in the dairy category accounting for 46.0% of retail value sales and can be generally found in supermarkets and online. It is difficult to find "free from" products in channels like independent stores and mixed retailers, with older consumers having little awareness of such alternatives. Understanding of the "free from" category varies between cultures. Additional marketing within several poorer countries is needed to communicate the benefits of "free from" products and to have domestic manufacturers recognize the importance of wanting to develop and launch new "free from" products, which is still relatively rare within these poorer countries or within areas where a commodity is densely popular as an ingredient in meal preparation. Some countries are more skeptical in accepting that certain food sensitivity symptoms exist, and there are competitive landscape differences in demand which creates variations in the willingness to accept such food sensitivities. For example, wheat products such as rice, noodles and bread are staple foods within Asian countries and its hard for their cultures to accept such food insensitivities within such important food categories. Building more consumer confidence in international food sensitivity brands is important, along with gaining a wider consumer audience by having strategic labelling to raise awareness of the benefits of food intolerance related products. These above factors serve to constrain growth in these "free from" categories. Understanding the food intolerance categories, the various allergies associated with certain food products and pursuing ongoing research and technical developments, along with knowledge on societal differences within various regions, is key towards the success of growing sales within "free from" food products.

Definitions

Better-for-youFootnote *
This category includes packaged food and beverages products where the amount of a substance considered to be less healthy (fat, sugar, salt, carbohydrates) has been actively reduced during production. To qualify for inclusion in this category, the "less healthy" element of the food stuff needs to have been actively removed or substituted during the processing. This should form part of the positioning/marketing of the product. Products which are naturally fat/sugar/carbohydrate -free are not included.
Dairy-free (Mintel)
This claim is used when on-pack terms highlight that the product is dairy free. Products that state to be free from milk or non-dairy may contain milk proteins or other milk derived ingredients. The dairy-free claim would only be captured for 'free from milk' and 'non-dairy' products when they are actually free from dairy and dairy derivatives. The claim is not captured for products that claim to be free from milk fat, milk powder, cow's milk, lactic protein or milk enzymes.
Diabetic foodFootnote *
With Type 1 diabetes (once known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM]) the body destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetics produce little or no insulin themselves and are dependent upon insulin medication. With type 2 (most common) diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but not enough to meet the body's needs. In some cases, enough insulin is made, but the body is unable to use it. Type 2 diabetes is often affected by obesity and can sometimes be controlled by maintaining a proper body weight, eating right, and exercising. It has been referred to as non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Some type 2 diabetics will need medications or insulin injections to help control their diabetes. Although diabetics can control symptoms through diet alone, there tends to be a range of 'diabetic' products available. Only products positioned as 'diabetic' are included. Standard sugar-free or reduced-sugar products are excluded.
Euromonitor International Global Consumer Trends surveyFootnote *
This survey contains tracked consumer survey data for 5 years in 2011, 2013, 2015, 2016 and 2017. The survey covers over 1,400 unique questions with over 300 survey topics. This report focuses on the global results reported within 21 countries for the Dietary Preferences/Dietary Restrictions Lifestyle trend portion of the surveys. The countries for analysis include Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Columbia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Middle East, Poland, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom and the United States. Euromonitor's analysts review the information for integrity results from an average of 1,000 up to 1,854 respondents from each country on 14 questions within the Dietary trend portion.
Food intoleranceFootnote *
This category includes gluten-free, lactose-free and diabetic food. Typically these foods can be characterized as products made to look and taste like a food that normally contains a product that can cause a food intolerance or allergy. Examples include gluten-free bread, or lactose-free milk. This excludes foods that are certified 'free' of a specific product when this is based on use of sterilized equipment. Distinction should be made between the terms food allergy and food intolerance. Food intolerance is an adverse food-induced reaction that does not involve the immune system. Lactose intolerance is one example of food intolerance. A food allergy occurs when the immune system reacts to a certain food. Avoidance is the only way to prevent an allergic reaction.
Fortified / Functional (FF)Footnote *
This category includes fortified / functional food and beverages. When identifying FF products, we focus on products to which health ingredients or/and nutrients have been added. To be included here the enhancement has to be highlighted in the label or hold a health claim / nutritional claim. FF food and beverages provide health benefits beyond their nutritional value and/or the level of added ingredients wouldn't normally be found in that product. To merit inclusion in this category, the defining criterion here is that the product must have been actively fortified / enhanced during production. As such, inherently healthy products such as 100% fruit / vegetable juices are only included under "fortified / functional" if additional health ingredients (for example, calcium, omega-3) have been added. To be included, the health benefit needs to form part of positioning/marketing of the product.
"Free from"Footnote *
This category includes free from gluten, free from lactose, free from allergens, free from dairy and free from meat products. This excludes foods which are certified 'free' of a specific product when this is based on use of sterilised equipment.
"Free from" baby foodFootnote *
This category includes free from gluten, free from lactose, free from allergens, free from dairy and free from meat products. This excludes foods which are certified 'free' of a specific product when this is based on use of sterilised equipment.
"Free from" baked goodsFootnote *
This category includes free from gluten, free from lactose, free from allergens, free from dairy and free from meat products. This excludes foods which are certified 'free' of a specific product when this is based on use of sterilised equipment.
"Free from" dairy / other or milk alternatives / soy chilled and shelf stable desserts / soy yoghurtFootnote *
This category includes plant based alternatives. These products need to be positioned/marketed as 'dairy-free'.
"Free from" gluten bread / breakfast cereals / dried or prepared or other baby food / gluten cakes / pasta / ready meals / sweet biscuitsFootnote *
This category includes products to which gluten has been actively removed or include grains that are naturally free from gluten. To be included, these products need to be very explicitly positioned / marketed as 'gluten-free'. Specially manufactured gluten free foods which are labelled as such are often available in categories such as bread, biscuits, breakfast cereals and pasta. Please note that product categories which are naturally free from gluten are excluded even if this aspect is highlighted on packaging (eg. gluten free yoghurt).
"Free from" lactose milk or other dairy / lactose cheese / powder or special baby milk formulaFootnote *
This category includes dairy based products to which lactose has been actively removed. These products need to be positioned/marketed as 'lactose free'. Food products that may contain lactose include: milk, ice cream, baked goods, cereals, soups, margarine, salad dressings and products labelled 'non-dairy' such as coffee creamer.
"Free from" meat substitutes / chilled or frozen or other meat substitutes / soy-based or other ready mealsFootnote *
This category includes plant based products that are positioned as a replacement of meat based variants. It includes products where meat has been substituted by soy, quorn (mycoprotein), non-soy beans (ie, black bean burgers), wheat gluten, etc.
"Free from" packaged foodFootnote *
This category includes free from gluten, free from lactose, free from allergens, free from dairy and free from meat products. This excludes foods which are certified 'free' of a specific product when this is based on use of sterilised equipment.
"Free from" ready mealsFootnote *
This category includes free from gluten, free from lactose, free from allergens, free from dairy and free from meat products. This excludes foods which are certified 'free' of a specific product when this is based on use of sterilised equipment.
Gluten-free foodFootnote *
These products are designed for people with intolerance to wheat, and specifically for people with Celiac disease who suffer from a lifelong inflammatory condition of the intestinal tract caused by gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, oats and barley. Damage from gluten reduces the body's ability to absorb nutrients from food. The only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. Specially manufactured gluten-free foods that are labelled as such are often available to replace flour, bread, biscuits and pasta. Products that are naturally free from gluten are excluded.
HA liquid or powder milk formulaFootnote *
This category includes all infant nutritional products that are partially hydrolyzed. These products are better tolerated and help to reduce the onset of some allergic symptoms. Recommended for high-risk infants before they show any sign of cow's milk allergy. Hypoallergenic milk formula usually has the label 'HA' on the pack.
Health and wellnessFootnote *
Health and wellness is the aggregation of organic food and beverages, fortified /functional food and beverages, naturally healthy food and beverages, better for you food and beverages and food intolerance products.
Lactose-free foodFootnote *
Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, the predominant sugar of milk. Common symptoms include nausea, cramps, bloating, gas, and diarrhea. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. Lactose-free milk and other products are available at many supermarkets. The milk contains all of the nutrients found in regular milk and remains fresh for about the same length of time or longer if it is super-pasteurised. Food products that may contain lactose include: baked goods, cereals, instant potatoes, soups, margarine, lunch meats, salad dressings and products labelled "non-dairy" such as coffee creamer. Products that are naturally free from lactose are excluded, with the exception of soy-based ice cream positioned as lactose free.
Mycoprotein (Wikipedia)
Is a form of single-cell protein, also known as fungal protein, is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as "Protein derived from fungi, especially as produced for human consumption".
No animal ingredients (Mintel)
Food and non-food. This claim is used where a product clearly states on pack that it does not contain any animal ingredients, or any animal-derived ingredients. We do not look at the ingredients list for verification for this claim. If a product indicates that it has not been tested on animals, then only the Ethical-Animal claim is used. For beauty products, this claim is also used for products suitable for vegetarians and/or vegans.
Vegan (Mintel)
Food and non-food. All products that make an on pack claim to be suitable for use or consumption by vegans.
Vegetarian (Mintel)
Food and non-food. This product is used to identify products that are suitable for vegetarian diets. This claim is used when a product is indicated for vegetarians, or stated to be made entirely from vegetarian ingredients. Not used if vegetarian is not listed on pack, or for products like meat substitutes, soya, or quorn unless it specifically states that it is suitable for vegetarians or made entirely of vegetarian ingredients. In some countries, such as India, the vegetarian claim is conveyed through a "green dot" logo, as appears in the example below.
Weight ManagementFootnote *
It is the aggregation of health and wellness food and beverages positioned as supporting weight management, weight loss, slim figure, slim waist, fat burning and satiety, be it in a passive way, by offering reduced content of fat, sugar and carbs or in an active way, fortified with functional ingredients that induce satiety, fat burning or other ways to help manage weight. Key functional ingredients include L'Carnitine, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), green tea extract, whey protein, soy protein, dietary fibre, guar gum, etc.

For more information

International Trade Commissioners can provide Canadian industry with on-the-ground expertise regarding market potential, current conditions and local business contacts, and are an excellent point of contact for export advice.

For additional intelligence on this and other markets, the complete library of Global Analysis reports can be found on the International agri-food market intelligence page, arranged by region.

Resources

Health and Wellness series – Pathfinder on global trends in food intolerance related products
Global Analysis Report

Prepared by: Erin-Ann Chauvin, International Market Analyst

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