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Shrinkage and porosity evolution during air-drying of non-cellular food systems: Experimental data versus mathematical modelling

Nguyen, T.K., Khalloufi, S., Mondor, M., Ratti, C. (2018). Shrinkage and porosity evolution during air-drying of non-cellular food systems: Experimental data versus mathematical modelling, 103 215-225. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2017.10.013

Abstract

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd In the present work, the impact of glass transition on shrinkage of non-cellular food systems (NCFS) during air-drying will be assessed from experimental data and the interpretation of a ‘shrinkage’ function involved in a mathematical model. Two NCFS made from a mixture of water/maltodextrin/agar (w/w/w: 1/0.15/0.015) were created out of maltodextrins with dextrose equivalent 19 (MD19) or 36 (MD36). The NCFS made with MD19 had 30 °C higher Tg than those with MD36. This information indicated that, during drying, the NCFS with MD19 would pass from rubbery to glassy state sooner than NCFS MD36, for which glass transition only happens close to the end of drying. For the two NCFS, porosity and volume reduction as a function of moisture content were captured with high accuracy when represented by the mathematical models previously developed. No significant differences in porosity and in maximum shrinkage between both samples during drying were observed. As well, no change in the slope of the shrinkage curve as a function of moisture content was perceived. These results indicate that glass transition alone is not a determinant factor in changes of porosity or volume during air-drying.

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