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A comparative study of the antioxidant potential and metabolic profiling of lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis idaea) from Northern Manitoba and Newfoundland

Bhusal, A., Isaak, C.K., Aliani, M., Siow, Y.L., and Brown, D.C.W. (2016) A comparative study of the antioxidant potential and metabolic profiling of lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis idaea) from Northern Manitoba and Newfoundland. Therapeutic Applications of Functional Food and Bioactives, April 21-23, 2016 Winnipeg, Canada

Abstract

Lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) are edible fruit that belong to the Ericaceae plant family. A growing body of evidence suggests that consumption of berries provide considerable health benefits due to their high polyphenols, antioxidants, vitamins and mineral content. Therefore, it is beneficial to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of these berries in order to select lines with higher antioxidant capacity. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant capacity, total phenolics, total anthocyanins, anti-apoptotic effect and the metabolomic profile of lingonberries from Northern Manitoba (wild) and Newfoundland (greenhouse-grown). A total of 159 lingonberry samples were collected from Northern Manitoba and Newfoundland. Samples were freeze dried, lyophilized, ground into powder and extracted with solvent methanol. Total anthocyanins was determined by the pH differential method, total phenolics by the Folin-Ciocalteau’s assay, the anti-apoptotic effect was determined fluorescently and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay was utilized to evaluate the antioxidant capacity. Our study shows that Northern Manitoba-grown lingonberries contain a higher (p<0.05) level of anthocyanins and phenolics compared to Newfoundland greenhouse-grown lingonberries. Results show that Northern Mantoba-grown lingonberries have higher (p<0.05) antioxidant capacity compared to ones grown in Newfoundland and demonstrated anti-apoptotic effect. Findings from this study suggests that berries grown in green house conditions and extreme climates have different antioxidant capacity, total phenolics and anthocyanins. Results from this study support the view that berries are sources of natural antioxidants and warrant further investigations into selecting lines to obtain a line or cultivar that produces berries with higher antioxidant capacity which in turn may translate to greater health benefits.

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