Language selection

Search

Pastinaca sativa - contribution to the CABI Invasive Species Compendium – a web-based database (http://www.cabi.org/isc/).

Darbyshire, S.J. and Simard, M.-J. (2014). "Pastinaca sativa - contribution to the CABI Invasive Species Compendium – a web-based database (http://www.cabi.org/isc/)."

Abstract

Summary of Invasiveness: Parsnip or wild parsnip, Pastinaca sativa, is native in Europe. It was developed as a vegetable root crop and subsequently introduced throughout much of the temperate world. Parsnip has escaped from cultivation and become a weed of disturbed habitats, perennial crops and reduced-tillage systems, especially in North America, but also South America, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and eastward in Asia. Contact or ingestion of wild plants is toxic to humans and livestock. It is avoided by grazing animals (populations tend to increase under grazing), and can become abundant in disturbed areas where activities bring it into contact with humans (e.g., transportation corridors, orchards, parks, etc.), or where disturbance occurs frequently such as in riparian habitats. Populations can displace other vegetation, and selective control may be difficult or prohibitive. It is considered a serious threat to human health in parts of its introduced range and is sometimes regulated as a noxious weed.

Report a problem on this page
Please select all that apply:

Date modified: