Language selection

Search

Quantitative real-time PCR-based assessment of tile drainage management influences on bacterial pathogens in tile drainage and groundwater

Liu, L., Cloutier, M., Craiovan, E., Edwards, M., Frey, S.K., Gottschall, N., Lapen, D.R., Sunohara, M., Topp, E., Khan, I.U.H. (2018). Quantitative real-time PCR-based assessment of tile drainage management influences on bacterial pathogens in tile drainage and groundwater, 624 1586-1597. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.10.200

Abstract

© 2017 This study compared the impact of controlled tile drainage (CD) and freely draining (FD) systems on the prevalence and quantitative real-time PCR-based enumeration of four major pathogens including Arcobacter butzleri, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, and Helicobacter pylori in tile- and groundwater following a fall liquid swine manure (LSM) application on clay loam field plots. Although the prevalence of all target pathogens were detected in CD and FD systems, the loads of A. butzleri, C. jejuni, and C. coli were significantly lower in CD tile-water (p < 0.05), in relation to FD tile-water. However, concentrations of A. butzleri were significantly greater in CD than FD tile-water (p < 0.05). In shallow groundwater (1.2 m depth), concentrations of A. butzleri, C. coli, and H. pylori showed no significant difference between CD and FD plots, while C. jejuni concentrations were significantly higher in FD plots (p < 0.05). No impact of CD on the H. pylori was observed since quantitative detection in tile- and groundwater was scarce. Although speculative, H. pylori occurrence may have been related to the application of municipal biosolids four years prior to the LSM experiment. Overall, CD can be used to help minimize off-field export of pathogens into surface waters following manure applications to land, thereby reducing waterborne pathogen exposure risks to humans.

Report a problem on this page
Please select all that apply:
Date modified: