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Mapping trends in novel and emerging food processing technologies around the world

Jermann, C., Koutchma, T., Margas, E., Leadley, C., Ros-Polski, V. (2015). Mapping trends in novel and emerging food processing technologies around the world, 31 14-27. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ifset.2015.06.007

Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This paper discusses novel technologies and their applications in the world. Two surveys were independently designed and conducted by a North American (Survey 1) and by a European group (Survey 2). The respondents were food professionals from industry, academia and government. The questions sought to identify novel technologies either applied now or with the potential to be commercialised in 5-10 years, commercialisation factors, associated regulations and limitations. In Survey 1, HPP (80%), microwave (88%) and UV (84%) were the main technologies applied now and anticipated in the next 5 years. PEF was third instead of UV in Survey 2. The main drivers were higher quality products (94%), product safety (92%) and shelf life (91%). HPP and microwaves were identified as main technologies now and in the next 10 years. There were geographical differences with North America finding UV and radiation, and Europe finding PEF of more importance now. Cold plasma and PEF were anticipated to be more important in Europe in 10 years' time while HPP, microwave and UV remained more important to North America. Industrial relevance The emerging technologies mentioned in the survey have been developing since the early 20th century or before. However, they are not adopted on any large scale such as canning or heat pasteurisation. This study was conducted on a worldwide scale to determine current uses for emerging technologies in different food sectors. Some technologies are deemed of more commercial importance in certain countries than others. HPP and microwave heating are the two main technologies currently on commercial applications. PEF is more popular in Europe, especially the Netherlands where a commercial scale unit exists. On the contrary, microwave technology seems to be popular in all countries but the Netherlands. UV and radiation are more important in North America than Europe. Pressure and CO<inf>2</inf> is only deemed to be of commercial importance in North America.

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