Language selection

Search

Improved milk production efficiency in early lactation dairy cattle with dietary addition of a developmental fibrolytic enzyme additive

Holtshausen, L., Chung, Y.H., Gerardo-Cuervo, H., Oba, M., Beauchemin, K.A. (2011). Improved milk production efficiency in early lactation dairy cattle with dietary addition of a developmental fibrolytic enzyme additive, 94(2), 899-907. http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2010-3573

Abstract

A 3-part study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a developmental fibrolytic enzyme additive on the digestibility of selected forages and the production performance of early-lactation dairy cows. In part 1, 4 replicate 24-h batch culture in vitro incubations were conducted with alfalfa hay, alfalfa silage, and barley silage as substrates and ruminal fluid as the inoculum. A developmental fibrolytic enzyme additive (AB Vista, Marlborough, UK) was added at 5 doses: 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 μL/g of forage dry matter (DM). After the 24-h incubation, DM, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) disappearance were determined. For alfalfa hay, DM, NDF, and ADF disappearance was greater at the highest dosage compared with no enzyme addition. Barley silage NDF and ADF and alfalfa silage NDF disappearance tended to be greater for the highest enzyme dosage compared with no enzyme addition. In part 2, 6 ruminally cannulated, lactating Holstein dairy cows were used to determine in situ degradation of alfalfa and barley silage, with (1.0 mL/kg of silage DM) and without added enzyme. Three cows received a control diet (no enzyme added) and the other 3 received an enzyme-supplemented (1.0 mL/kg of diet DM) diet. Enzyme addition after the 24. h in situ incubation did not affect the disappearance of barley silage or alfalfa silage. In part 3, 60 early-lactation Holstein dairy cows were fed 1 of 3 diets for a 10-wk period: (1) control (CTL; no enzyme), (2) low enzyme (CTL treated with 0.5. mL of enzyme/kg of diet DM), and (3) high enzyme (CTL treated with 1.0. mL of enzyme/kg of diet DM). Adding enzyme to the diet had no effect on milk yield, but dry matter intake was lower for the high enzyme treatment and tended to be lower for the low enzyme treatment compared with CTL. Consequently, milk production efficiency (kg of 3.5% fat-corrected milk/kg of DM intake) linearly increased with increasing enzyme addition. Cows fed the low and high enzyme diets were 5.3 (not statistically significant) and 11.3% more efficient, respectively, compared with CTL cows. This developmental fibrolytic enzyme additive has the potential to increase fiber digestibility of forages, which could lead to greater milk production efficiency for dairy cows in early lactation. © 2011 American Dairy Science Association.

Report a problem on this page
Please select all that apply:

Date modified: