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Long-term effects of semisolid beef manure application to forage grass on soil mineralizable nitrogen

Sharifi, M., Zebarth, B.J., Burton, D.L., Rodd, V., Grant, C.A. (2011). Long-term effects of semisolid beef manure application to forage grass on soil mineralizable nitrogen, 75(2), 649-658. http://dx.doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2010.0089

Abstract

Livestock manure is an important source of N for forage grass production. The long-term eff ects of semisolid beef manure application to forage grass on potentially mineralizable N (N 0), mineralizable N pools, and field estimates of soil N supply were evaluated in dike-land (heavy textured, poorly drained) and upland (medium-textured) soils in Nova Scotia, Canada. Treatments included an unfertilized control, annual spring application of 100 kg N ha -1 mineral fertilizer or annual applications of 75, 150, or 300 kg total Kjeldhal N ha -1 as manure (M75, M150, and M300, respectively) from 1995 to 2004. Soil samples collected in fall 2004 were used to estimate N 0 using a 44-wk aerobic incubation at 25°C. The N 0 values were 62 and 49% higher in the M300 treatment (324 and 480 kg N ha -l) than the other manure treatments (199 and 323 kg N ha -1) for the upland and dike-land soils, respectively. The mineralization rate coeffi cient ranged from 0.045 to 0.082 wk -1. Manure application increased the readily mineralizable N pool (Pool I); higher rates of application resulted in higher values in both soils. The intermediate and stable mineralizable N pools were increased only by the M300 treatment in the upland soil but not in the dike-land soil. Long-term manure application of the M300 treatment resulted in high N 0 with no yield benefi ts, which can increase the risk of N losses to the environment in both soils, whereas Pool I was responsive to all manure application rates. © Soil Science Society of America.

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