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Starch with high amylose and low in vitro digestibility increases short-chain fatty acid absorption, reduces peak insulin secretion, and modulates incretin secretion in pigs

Regmi, P.R., Van Kempen, T.A.T.G., Matte, J.J., Zijlstra, R.T. (2011). Starch with high amylose and low in vitro digestibility increases short-chain fatty acid absorption, reduces peak insulin secretion, and modulates incretin secretion in pigs, 141(3), 398-405. http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.110.132449

Abstract

Diets containing different starch types affect peripheral glucose and insulin responses. However, the role of starch chemistry in kinetics of nutrient absorption and insulin and incretin secretion is poorly understood. Four portal vein-catheterized pigs (35.0 ± 0.2 kg body weight) consumed 4 diets containing 70% purified starch [0-63.2% amylose content and 0.22 (slowly) to 1.06%/min (rapidly) maximum rate of in vitro digestion] for 7-d periods in a 4 x 4 Latin square. On d 7, blood was collected for 12 h postprandial with simultaneous blood flow measurement for determining the net portal appearance (NPA) of nutrients and hormones. The NPA of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) during 0-4 h postprandial were lower (P < 0.05) and those of butyrate and total SCFA were higher (P < 0.05) when pigs consumed the diet containing slowly digestible compared with rapidly digestible starch. The peak NPA of insulin occurred prior to that of glucose when pigs consumed diets containing rapidly digestible starch. The kinetics of insulin secretion had a linear positive relation with kinetics of NPA of glucose (R2 = 0.50; P < 0.01). In conclusion, starch with high amylose and low in vitro digestibility decreases the kinetics of glucose absorption and insulin and GIP secretion and increases SCFA absorption and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. In conclusion, starch with high amylose content and a lower rate and extent of in vitro digestion decreased glucose absorption and insulin secretion and increased SCFA absorption. © 2011 American Society for Nutrition.

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