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Inclusion of antibiotics in feed alters greenhouse gas emissions from feedlot manure during composting

Hao, X., Xu, S., Larney, F.J., Stanford, K., Cessna, A.J., McAllister, T.A. (2011). Inclusion of antibiotics in feed alters greenhouse gas emissions from feedlot manure during composting, 89(2), 257-267. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10705-010-9391-3

Abstract

In this study, the effects of dietary inclusion of antibiotics on emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG: CO2, CH4 and N2O) from cattle manure during composting were investigated. Manure was collected at the end of two feeding trials in 2005 and 2006 in which feedlot cattle were assigned to one of five dietary groups: (1) Control: no antibiotics added; (2) TYL11: tylosin at 11 mg kg-1 feed; (3) CTC11: chlortetracycline at 11 mg kg-1 feed; (4) CTC44: chlortetracycline at 44 mg kg-1 feed; and CTC44SMZ44: chlortetracycline and sulfamethazine, each at 44 mg kg-1 feed. Open windrows were constructed and the rate of GHG emission was measured periodically. In both years, CO2 surface emissions were higher (P < 0. 05) for treatments CTC11 and CTC44SMZ44 than for the Control. The CO2 emission rates in 2005 were lower (P < 0. 05) than in 2006, reflecting lower total carbon (TC) content in the manure in 2005 (138 ± 2 g kg-1) than in 2006 (245 ± 2 g kg-1). The rate of CH4 emission varied from 0. 006 to 0. 232 g C m-2 day-1. Average values from all four antibiotic treatments were similar (P > 0.05) to the Control in both years. The N2O emission rates were higher (P > 0.05) with CTC44SMZ44 (2005), TYL11 (2006) and CTC11 (2006) than with Control. While antibiotics do alter GHG emissions from composted feedlot manure, the mechanisms responsible are not clear and warrant further investigation. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

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