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Preliminary study of surface temperature distribution during microwave heating of cereals and oilseed.

Vadivambal, R., Jayas, D.S., Chelladurai, V., White, N.D.G. (2010). "Preliminary study of surface temperature distribution during microwave heating of cereals and oilseed.", Canadian Biosystems Engineering, 51, pp. 3.45-3.52.

Abstract

The major drawback associated with microwave heating is the non-uniform temperature distribution. Temperature distribution studies have shown that various materials behave differently during microwave heating. A pilot-scale industrial microwave dryer operating at 2450 MHz was used to heat grains and oilseed. An infra-red thermal camera was used in this study to determine the temperature distribution in bulk rye and oats at 14, 16, and 18% moisture content (wet basis) and sunflower seeds at 8, 10, and 12% moisture content after being heated in the microwave drier. Fifty grams of grain were placed in a sample holder and allowed to pass on a conveyor belt under the applicator at 0, 200, 300, 400, and 500 W for 28 or 56 s. There were hot and cool regions in the samples. The temperature difference between hot and cool regions in a given sample varied between 23 and 62°C for rye, 7 and 25°C for oats and 7 and 29°C for sunflower seeds. The preliminary results of this study suggest that while using microwave as a heat treatment, the maximum temperature that can affect seed viability (potential to germinate under favorable conditions) should be taken into consideration, when developing microwave processing systems for grains and oilseeds.

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