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In vitro effects of phlorotannins from Ascophyllum nodosum (brown seaweed) on rumen bacterial populations and fermentation

Wang, Y., Alexander, T.W., Mcallister, T.A. (2009). In vitro effects of phlorotannins from Ascophyllum nodosum (brown seaweed) on rumen bacterial populations and fermentation, 89(13), 2252-2260. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.3717

Abstract

Background: Use of brown algae (seaweed) in ruminant diets is increasing, but the effects of its phlorotannins (PT) on rumen microbial ecology have not been determined. Mixed forage (50: 25: 25 ground barley silage-alfalfa hay-grass hay) was used as substrate in a batch culture ruminal incubation that included PT extracted from Ascophyllum nodosum, with and without polyethylene glycol. Principal ruminal bacteria were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: At 500 μg mL-1, PT reduced growth of Fibrobacter succinogenes by 78%, 83% and 65% at 6, 12 and 24 h (P < 0.001), Ruminococcus albusat 24 h only(P < 0.01)and did not affect R.flavefaciens.Non-cellulolytic bacteria Selenomonas ruminantium, Ruminobacter amylophilus and Prevotella bryantii were increased(P < 0.001) by PTat 12and 24 h. Effects of PT on fermentation products (gas production, volatile fatty acid profiles and ammonia accumulation) were consistent with alterations in rumen microbial populations. Conclusion: The effects of PT on ruminal bacteria were species-dependent, which suggests that diet may mediate PT effects on animal performance. The variation in sensitivity of ruminal bacteria to PT reflects previously reported effects of condensed tannins from terrestrial plants on microbial populations. Copyright © 2009 Crown in the right of Canada.

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