Language selection

Search

Effectiveness of fungicide seed treatments for preventing seed-to-seedling transmission of Fusarium graminearum under controlled-environment conditions

Fernandez, M.R., Turkington, T.K., May, W.E. (2009). Effectiveness of fungicide seed treatments for preventing seed-to-seedling transmission of Fusarium graminearum under controlled-environment conditions, 89(4), 811-821. http://dx.doi.org/10.4141/CJPS08132

Abstract

Can. J. Plant Sci. 89:811 -821. Fusarium head blight (FHB) is well established in the eastern prairies, but for the most part it has been absent from western regions, especially under dryland conditions. This has been largely attributed to dry and hot conditions during some years, and the limited occurrence of F. graminearum in the western prairies. It is of importance to prevent the movement of F. graminearum, the most important FHB pathogen in North America, to areas where this pathogen is not commonly found. Three controlled-environment studies, using different Fusarium-infected common and durum wheat seed lots, were conducted to determine the effectiveness of currently registered fungicide seed treatments in improving seedling emergence and plant development, and preventing the growth of F. graminearum from infected seed to plant tissue. Fungicide treatments improved seedling emergence from the most infected seed over the untreated infected control, but most treatments did not improve emergence in the other experiments. Plant growth in the fungicide treatments was either similar to or slower than in the untreated controls. Fusarium graminearum was isolated from discoloured tissue in all treatments and was generally more common in crowns than in subcrown internodes. No fungicide treatment reduced discolouration of plant tissue or percentage isolation of F. graminearum or other Fusarium spp. consistently. We conclude that while currently registered seed treatments might be effective in improving seedling emergence in some infected wheat seed lots, they do not prevent the growth of F. graminearum from seeds to plant tissue. For the western prairies, the use of fungicide seed treatments as a strategy in the prevention of spread of FHB would require that they be effective primarily against F. graminearum. Performance of fungicide seed treatments against Fusarium-infected wheat seed should also be determined under typical growing conditions across the western prairies.

Report a problem on this page
Please select all that apply:
Date modified: