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Livestock waste treatment systems for reducing environmental exposure to hazardous enteric pathogens: Some considerations

Topp, E., Scott, A., Lapen, D.R., Lyautey, E., Duriez, P. (2009). Livestock waste treatment systems for reducing environmental exposure to hazardous enteric pathogens: Some considerations, 100(22), 5395-5398. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2008.11.001

Abstract

Intensive livestock production systems produce significant quantities of excreted material that must be managed to protect water, air, and crop quality. Many jurisdictions mandate how livestock wastes are managed to protect adjacent water quality from microbial and chemical contaminants that pose an environmental and human health challenge. Here, we consider innovative livestock waste treatment systems in the context of multi-barrier strategies for protecting water quality from agricultural contamination. Specifically, we consider some aspects of how enteric bacterial populations can evolve during manure storage, how their fate following land application of manure can vary according to manure composition, and finally the challenge of distinguishing enteric pathogens of agricultural provenance from those of other sources of fecal pollution at a policy-relevant watershed scale. The beneficial impacts of livestock waste treatment on risk to humans via exposure to manured land are illustrated using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) scenarios. Overall, innovative livestock treatment systems offer a crucially important strategy for making livestock wastes more benign before they are released into the broader environment. Crown Copyright © 2008.

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