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Fate of Fusarium graminearum and other Fusarium species during composting of beef cattle feedlot manure.

Larney, F.J. and Turkington, T.K. (2009). "Fate of Fusarium graminearum and other Fusarium species during composting of beef cattle feedlot manure.", Compost Science & Utilization, 17(4), pp. 247-256.

Abstract

Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a major concern for the cereal industry in Alberta, Canada. Infested feed grain in feedlot manure may act as a means of spreading the disease when manure is land applied. The ability of manure composting to eradicate the pathogen on infested grain (wheat, barley, corn) was evaluated. F. graminearum and other Fusarium spp. were rapidly eradicated from infested grains buried in compost windrows with no recovery after 2 d where windrow temperature attained 51°C. Under cooler windrow conditions (11.9 to 17.5°C), recovery of F. graminearum reached zero on Day 9 for corn (Zea mays L.), Day 14 for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and Day 22 for barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), showing that factors in addition to compost temperature may play a role in pathogen elimination. Composting represents an effective strategy in mitigating the dissemination of F. graminearum via manure should land application occur on fields that are subsequently used for grain production.

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