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2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities

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International Standard Serial Number: 1494-2070

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

The Honourable Gerry Ritz, P.C., M.P.,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Minister's Message

The Honourable Gerry Ritz

Canada's agriculture and food industry is an economic powerhouse that drives over $50 billion of our exports, one in eight jobs and almost 7% of our gross domestic product, while delivering wholesome, safe, innovative food to consumers here in Canada and around the world. As Minister, I'm proud to promote this dynamic sector.

With half of Canada's agricultural production exported, trade is critical to a strong farm gate and a strong economy. We'll continue to work with industry on our aggressive trade agenda, including free trade agreements with key markets like Europe and South Korea, while removing barriers to keep trade open and science-based.

Canada's grain industry accounts for about half of all our agriculture and food trade. We've embarked on an ambitious plan to help the industry prosper in the current business environment, beginning with marketing freedom for Western grain growers, and rail legislation to ensure our world-class grains reach our international customers in a predictable and timely way. We'll continue to support a competitive grain industry through the Modernization of Canada's Grain Industry Act, while fostering innovation by updating plant breeders' rights under the Agricultural Growth Act.

Here at home, our investments with the provinces and territories under the $3-billion Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework will continue to boost innovation, competitiveness and market development, while helping producers manage business risk.

We'll continue to invest in innovation to support new industry-led research clusters, while helping entrepreneurs get smart ideas off the drawing board and into the marketplace. To maximize resources and results, we will continue to promote collaborative research and development opportunities with the private sector and research institutions. Of course, innovation also includes ensuring that the right regulatory environment exists for easier adoption of new technologies to improve productivity and foster greater market access.

I'm optimistic about the future of Canada's agriculture and food industry. Global demand for food is expected to rise 60% over the coming three decades. More than ever, the world is turning to Canada for healthy, safe, innovative food produced under sustainable systems. Working with our portfolio partners, along with governments and industry, we'll continue to drive transformative change, so Canada's innovative farmers and food processors can maximize opportunities in the global marketplace, while generating jobs and growth for Canadians.

Honourable Gerry Ritz, P.C., M.P.,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Institutional Head: Andrea Lyon, Deputy Minister

Ministerial Portfolio: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Enabling Instrument: Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. A-9

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1994

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada was created in 1868 – one year after Confederation – because of the importance of agriculture to the economic, social and cultural development of Canada. Today, the Department helps create the conditions for the long-term profitability, sustainability and adaptability of the Canadian agricultural sector. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada supports the sector through initiatives that promote innovation and competitiveness, and that proactively manage risk. The Department's goal is to position agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product industries to realize their full potential by seizing new opportunities in the growing domestic and global marketplace.

Our Vision

To drive innovation and ingenuity to build a world leading agricultural and food economy for the benefit of all Canadians

Our Mission

To provide leadership in the growth and development of a competitive, innovative and sustainable Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector

Our Service Pledge

"We are an organization dedicated to serving the public. We are here to provide support to both our clients and colleagues."

Responsibilities

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides information, research and technology, and policies and programs to help Canada's agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector compete in markets at home and abroad, manage risk and embrace innovation. The activities of the Department extend from the farmer to the consumer, from the farm to global markets, through all phases of sustainably producing, processing and marketing of agriculture and agri-food products. In this regard, and in recognition that agriculture is a shared jurisdiction, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada works closely with provincial and territorial governments.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's mandate is based upon the Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Act. The Minister is also responsible for the administration of several other Acts, such as the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act.

The Department is responsible for ensuring collaboration among the organizations within the Agriculture and Agri-Food Portfolio; this means coherent policy and program development and effective cooperation in meeting challenges on cross-portfolio issues. The portfolio partners and agencies consist of: the Canadian Dairy Commission; the Canadian Grain Commission; Farm Credit Canada; the Canada Agricultural Review Tribunal; and the Farm Products Council of Canada. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada also includes the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency, a special operating agency that regulates and supervises pari-mutuel betting on horse racing at racetracks across Canada.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

  • 1. Strategic Outcome: A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk
    • 1.1 Program: Business Risk Management
      • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: AgriStability
      • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: AgriInvest
      • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: AgriRecovery
      • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: AgriInsurance
      • 1.1.5 Sub-Program: AgriRisk
      • 1.1.6 Sub-Program: Agricultural Marketing Programs Act
      • 1.1.7 Sub-Program: Canadian Agricultural Loans Act
    • 1.2 Program: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems
      • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Trade and Market Expansion
      • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Sector Engagement and Development
      • 1.2.3 Sub-Program: Market Development
      • 1.2.4 Sub-Program: Assurance Systems
      • 1.2.5 Sub-Program: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Market Development and Competitiveness
      • 1.2.6 Sub-Program: Pest Management: Pesticides Minor Use Program
      • 1.2.7 Sub-Program: Pest Management: Pesticides Risk Reduction Program
      • 1.2.8 Sub-Program: Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program
    • 1.3 Program: Farm Products Council of Canada
  • 2. Strategic Outcome: An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector
    • 2.1 Program: Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability
      • 2.1.1 Sub-Program: Science Supporting an Innovative and Sustainable Sector
      • 2.1.2 Sub-Program: Research Accelerating Innovation
      • 2.1.3 Sub-Program: Research, Development and Knowledge Transfer
      • 2.1.4 Sub-Program: Enabling Commercialization and Adoption
      • 2.1.5 Sub-Program: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Research, Adoption and Commercialization
      • 2.1.6 Sub-Program: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Environment
      • 2.1.7 Sub-Program: Agricultural Greenhouse Gases
    • 2.2 Program: Industry Capacity
      • 2.2.1 Sub-Program: Farm Debt Mediation Service
      • 2.2.2 Sub-Program: Fostering Business Development
      • 2.2.3 Sub-Program:Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Adaptability and Industry Capacity
      • 2.2.4 Sub-Program: Community Pastures
      • 2.2.5 Sub-Program: Water Infrastructure
      • 2.2.6 Sub-Program: Churchill Port Utilisation Program
      • 2.2.7 Sub-Program: Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program
    • 2.3 Program: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency
    • 3.1 Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Support and improve the competitiveness and adaptability of the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector Ongoing
(As defined by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report)
  • Strategic Outcome 1 – A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2 – An innovative sector

Description

Why is this a priority?

  • Increasing sector competitiveness, both internationally and domestically, improves the resiliency of the sector and its ability to adapt and respond to opportunities and challenges.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Advance and drive a science- and risk-based regulatory environment to support domestic and global competitiveness
  • Continue to reform and support the modernization of the grain sector and improve the performance of its supply chain
  • Assess mid-term progress towards identified Growing Forward 2 program outcomes to inform the development of the successor policy framework
Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Maintain and improve access to key international markets Ongoing
  • Strategic Outcome 1 – A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2 – An innovative sector

Description

Why is this a priority?

  • Increasing global demand for Canadian agricultural, agri-food and agri-based products generates positive returns to the Canadian economy in the form of increased profitability, investment and employment in the industry.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Advance the Government of Canada's agriculture trade and market access agenda
  • Enable the sector to take advantage of opportunities from recent trade agreements
  • Ensure a coherent and co-ordinated approach to the Department's international strategy including through the development and implementation of individual country strategies
Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Generate new knowledge, foster innovation and increase adoption and commercialization of agricultural, agri-food and agri-based products, processes or practices Ongoing
  • Strategic Outcome 1 – A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2 – An innovative sector

Description

Why is this a priority?

  • Innovation, enabled through knowledge creation and transfer, enhances economic growth and sustainability of the sector.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Implement the Science and Technology Strategic Direction to guide Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada investment in support of a resilient and innovative sector
  • Continue to work with regulatory partners to create and maintain a modern regulatory environment that encourages and supports innovation
Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Continue to improve program and service delivery Ongoing
  • Strategic Outcome 1 – A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2 – An innovative sector

Description

Why is this a priority?

  • Transformation supports improved and eased access to government services and programs.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Leverage information and technology capacity to improve business practices
Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Support and engage our workforce to meet current and future work objectives and opportunities in a manner that supports diversity and inclusiveness Ongoing
  • Strategic Outcome 1 – A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2 – An innovative sector

Description

Why is this a priority?

  • An adaptable, high-performing, engaged, and diverse workforce with the right skills supports the capacity to meet current and evolving business objectives of the Department.
  • Blueprint 2020 presents a vision of a high-performing Public Service that works collaboratively, makes use of new technologies, and seeks efficient and innovative approaches in its work.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • Ensure excellence through talent and performance management including support for learning and professional development opportunities
  • Advance the Blueprint 2020 commitment to strengthen leadership and promote a culture of open communication, collaboration and continuous improvement
  • Address Public Service Employee Survey results

Risk Analysis

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada continues to enhance its decision-making capacity by effectively embedding risk and opportunity management within its culture, processes and planning practices. Annually, the Department updates its Corporate Risk Profile to communicate the key risks and opportunities that have the potential to affect the achievement of Strategic Outcomes. For 2015–16, key departmental corporate risks and opportunities are presented below in alphabetical order.

Risk/Opportunity Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Catastrophic Crisis Risk:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's capacity to prepare for and respond to catastrophic crises affecting the industry, including those related to natural and accidental hazards (for example, animal health, weather, et cetera) may have consequences for the agriculture, agri-based and agri-food sector and/or for Canadians.
  • Continued engagement with partners (federal, provincial/territorial, industry, international) and development and enhancement of tools to support a comprehensive emergency management approach (This would include, for example, emergency management exercises, internal documents to guide emergency management responsibilities, infrastructure such as the National Emergency Operations Centre, federal, provincial and territorial governments and industry development of a Livestock Market Interruption Strategy, and development of a federal, provincial and territorial Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture.)
  • Strategic Outcome 1 - A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2 - An innovative sector
  • All Programs
Information Management and Technology Risk: The increasing complexity of the information management and technology environments may impact Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's ability to deliver on its mandate and maintain its security posture.
  • Departmental level governance processes for the prioritization, selection and approval of information management and technology investments to ensure that any necessary risk mitigation strategies are in place
  • Interdepartmental level governance processes for the management of horizontal initiatives to ensure that risks are closely monitored and mitigated
  • Continued implementation of controls with ongoing oversight to ensure achievement of desired results
  • Strategic Outcome 1- A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2 - An innovative sector
  • All Programs
Infrastructure Risk: Increasing maintenance and rehabilitation costs may affect the Department's ability to maintain its infrastructure and assets at an adequate level, and limit the capacity to invest in support of emerging priorities.
  • Continued oversight of the Department's infrastructure through its Investment Plan to support ongoing operations and priorities
  • Ongoing rejuvenation of a dam safety management system
  • Strategic Outcome 1 - A competitive sector
  • Strategic Outcome 2- An innovative sector
  • All Programs
Trade Opportunity: Strengthen and enhance trade relationships (that is, bilateral and multilateral) and work with partners to assist industry in capitalizing on trade opportunities.
  • Continued implementation and monitoring of trade negotiations and market access activities
  • Collaboration with provincial and territorial governments and with industry to share market intelligence and discuss trade-related issues to re-open, maintain and expand markets for Canadian agricultural products
  • Strategic Outcome 1 - A competitive sector
  • Program 1.1 Business Risk Management
  • Program 1.2 Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems

Emerging economies, changing consumer preferences, environmental pressures, new technologies, and population growth around the world will impact the future of Canada's agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector. Challenges and opportunities in the coming years will range in scope from the increasing demand for agri-food trade to how to address high variability in food commodity prices, farm input prices, exchange rates, and energy costs.

Global economic growth will be supported by emerging economies, such as China and India. The United States will remain a priority market for Canada; however, diversifying markets internationally will enable Canadian producers and processors to capitalize on new opportunities and meet the rising demands of global consumers for safe, high-quality, sustainably produced products. It will be important to engage with additional trading partners, both bilaterally and multilaterally. Since Canada exports a significant proportion of its agricultural production, barriers to trade are a potential risk for the agriculture sector. Continuing to improve market access so that more destinations are available for export can potentially reduce the impact of specific barriers to trade in foreign markets.

As a natural resource-based sector, agriculture is also subject to changing environmental risks (soil erosion, water quality, flood, drought, invasive species, changing climate, et cetera), as well as competition from other sectors for available natural resources. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides information and tools, and supports innovative approaches and solutions that producers can use to proactively anticipate, prepare for and respond to these changes to operating conditions by adapting, resisting damage and recovering quickly, thus reducing the frequency and severity of supply-chain disruptions and of associated costs to industry, governments and society.

By supporting research and development and innovation, the Department is helping Canadian farmers take advantage of existing and future opportunities and to address the challenges facing the sector. It is also striving to ensure that the right sector incentives and regulatory environment exist for easier adoption of new technologies to improve productivity and foster greater market access. Continued cooperation and collaboration among governments on key agricultural issues that support innovation and improve the overall competitiveness of the sector are also essential.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending1
2016–17
Planned Spending1
2017–18
Planned Spending1
2,257,088,060 2,257,088,060 2,231,481,999 2,226,428,999

1 Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. Planned spending has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2015. More information will be provided in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents)1
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
4,700 4,700 4,700

1 The Full-Time Equivalents do not include students or staff funded through respendable revenue sources. For example, in 2014–15, there were 20 Full-Time Equivalents employed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada funded by respendable revenue sources from collaborative research projects with industry, and other activities not funded through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada appropriations. Also, 455 Full-Time Equivalents were employed as students.

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk
Program 2012–13
Expenditures1
2013–14
Expenditures1
2014–15
Forecast Spending2
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending3
2016–17
Planned Spending3
2017–18
Planned Spending3
Program 1.1 Business Risk Management 1,420,001,333 1,280,762,636 1,298,253,755 1,301,429,496 1,301,429,496 1,305,829,496 1,306,579,496
Program 1.2 Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems * * 227,563,358 194,586,263 194,586,263 173,108,735 171,426,251
Program 1.3 Farm Products Council of Canada 2,998,099 2,869,840 3,023,237 3,028,779 3,028,779 3,028,779 3,028,779
Subtotal * * 1,528,840,350 1,499,044,538 1,499,044,538 1,481,967,010 1,481,034,526

* Due to significant changes in Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Program Alignment Architecture in 2014–15, expenditures for 2012–13 and 2013–14, have not been provided according to the new Program Alignment Architecture. Refer to the respective fiscal year's Departmental Performance Reports for spending based on the previous Program Alignment Architecture.

1 Expenditures represent the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.

2 Forecast spending reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year (not necessarily forecast expenditures).

3 Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. Planned spending has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2015. More information will be provided in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Strategic Outcome 2: An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector
Program 2012–13
Expenditures1
2013–14
Expenditures1
2014–15
Forecast Spending2
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending3
2016–17
Planned Spending3
2017–18
Planned Spending3
Program 2.1 Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability * * 573,783,997 537,550,506 537,550,506 530,833,077 531,076,601
Program 2.2 Industry Capacity * * 87,242,224 70,990,651 70,990,651 70,973,522 66,112,483
Program 2.3 Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (1,240,186) (2,158,401) 34,000 0 0 510,000 1,007,000
Subtotal * * 661,060,221 608,541,157 608,541,157 602,316,599 598,196,084

* Due to significant changes in Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Program Alignment Architecture in 2014–15, expenditures for 2012–13 and 2013–14, have not been provided according to the new Program Alignment Architecture. Refer to the respective fiscal year's Departmental Performance Reports for spending based on the previous Program Alignment Architecture.

1 Expenditures represent the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.

2 Forecast spending reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year (not necessarily forecast expenditures).

3 Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. Planned spending has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2015. More information will be provided in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Internal Services
Internal Services 2012–13
Expenditures1
2013–14
Expenditures1
2014–15
Forecast Spending2
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending3
2016–17
Planned Spending3
2017–18
Planned Spending3
Subtotal 327,379,980 232,577,216 167,059,704 149,502,365 149,502,365 147,198,390 147,198,389

1 Expenditures represent the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.

2 Forecast spending reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year (not necessarily forecast expenditures).

3 Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. Planned spending has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2015. More information will be provided in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 2012–13
Expenditures1
2013–14
Expenditures1
2014–15
Forecast Spending2
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending3
2016–17
Planned Spending3
2017–18
Planned Spending3
Subtotal 932,419,849 872,847,039 0 0 0 0 0

1 Expenditures represent the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.

2 Forecast spending reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year (not necessarily forecast expenditures).

3 Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. Planned spending has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2015. More information will be provided in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Total
2012–13
Expenditures1
2013–14
Expenditures1
2014–15
Forecast Spending2
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending3
2016–17
Planned Spending3
2017–18
Planned Spending3
Total 2,681,559,075 2,386,898,330 2,356,960,275 2,257,088,060 2,257,088,060 2,231,481,999 2,226,428,999

1 Expenditures represent the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.

2 Forecast spending reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year (not necessarily forecast expenditures).

3 Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. Planned spending has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2015. More information will be provided in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015–16 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015–16 Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome 1:
A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk
1.1 Business Risk Management Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 1,301,429,496
1.2 Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 194,586,263
1.3 Farm Products Council of Canada Economic Affairs A Fair and Secure Marketplace 3,028,779
Strategic Outcome 2: An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector 2.1 Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability Economic Affairs An Innovative and Knowledge-based Economy 537,550,506
2.2 Industry Capacity Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 70,990,651
2.3 Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency Economic Affairs A Fair and Secure Marketplace 0
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 2,107,585,695
Social Affairs 0
International Affairs 0
Government Affairs 0
Note: Total Planned Spending by Spending Area does not include Planned Spending for Internal Services.

Departmental Spending Trend

Spending Trend Graph - Description of the graph follows below.
Description of the Departmental Spending Trend Graph
Departmental Spending Trend Graph (in millions of dollars)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
Statutory 1,471 1,329 1,316 1,314 1,314 1,315
Voted 1,211 1,058 1,041 943 917 912

Notes:

  1. Spending for 2012–13 and 2013–14 represents the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.
  2. Spending for 2014–15 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year.
  3. Spending for 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. It has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2015. More information will be provided in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Over the period 2012–13 to 2017–18, spending varies from $2.7 billion spent in 2012–13 to $2.2 billion currently planned for 2017–18. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's programs and initiatives vary from year to year in response to changes affecting the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector as outlined below.

In 2012–13, transitional support was provided to the Canadian Wheat Board as it became a voluntary grain marketing organization, giving Western Canadian farmers freedom to market their wheat and barley on the open market. The decrease in spending in 2013–14 was largely attributable to planned spending reductions for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program, as well as a reduced requirement for statutory grants and contributions under Business Risk Management due to the industry generally experiencing positive returns in most sectors.

The decrease in forecast spending in 2014–15 reflects the recent restructuring undertaken by the Government, the sunsetting in 2013–14 of the Agriflexibilty program, and an updated forecast for the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act, as well as further reduced spending on the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program.

The decrease in planned spending in 2015–16, and beyond, is attributable to amounts carried forward into 2014–15 from the previous year, further planned spending reductions on the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program, as well as the sunsetting of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association Legacy Fund and Control of Diseases in the Hog Industry phase 2 at the end of 2014–15.

Estimates by Vote

For information on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's organizational appropriations, consult the 2015–16 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 1: A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Canada is a major producer and exporter of agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products, directly contributing to the economic stability and prosperity of Canadians. As such, the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector must be able to competitively produce, process and market its products, respond to challenges, and capture opportunities both domestically and internationally over the long-term. The Department supports the sector in proactively managing risks and in accessing and developing markets.

Program 1.1: Business Risk Management

Description: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has a comprehensive suite of Business Risk Management programs to better equip producers with the tools and capacity to manage business risks. This suite provides support for income losses, a disaster relief framework and insurance to protect farmers against production losses due to uncontrollable natural hazards as well as research, development, implementation and administration of new agricultural risk management tools. In addition to the Business Risk Management suite, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides producers with the ability to market their products when conditions and prices may be more favourable through loan guarantee programs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
1,301,429,496 1,301,429,496 1,305,829,496 1,306,579,496
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
381 381 382
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Producers' income losses are reduced The current year producers' net market income plus Business Risk Management program payments as a percent of the previous five-year average 85 March 31, 2016
Producers' income losses are reduced Percentage of producers considering the Business Risk Management suite of programs as an effective tool to manage risks 70 March 31, 2018
Producers' income losses are reduced Percentage of producers who are satisfied with the delivery of Business Risk Management programs 70 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

The Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework agreement came into effect for the 2013 program year and made available more than $3 billion over five years for strategic investments in innovation, competitiveness and market development, as well as a complete suite of Business Risk Management programs. Under Growing Forward 2, the focus of Business Risk Management programs is to provide assistance in response to severe market volatility and disaster situations through the AgriStability, the AgriInvest and the AgriInsurance programs, as well as the AgriRecovery Framework.

The performance indicators for the Business Risk Management programs reflect the new objectives under Growing Forward 2. The redesigned Business Risk Management programs came into effect for the 2013 program year and most of the processing of applications occurred in 2014–15. Starting in 2015–16, federal, provincial, and territorial governments will be compiling these applications and assessing the results against the new performance indicators.

In 2015–16, Growing Forward 2 will continue to support the research, development and implementation of private sector or industry-led, insurance-based products and other agricultural risk management tools through the AgriRisk Initiatives Program.

In addition to these core programs, the federal government will continue to provide producers with complementary loan-guarantee programs:

  • the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act program that provides a guarantee on asset-based loans to establish, improve and develop farms or to process, distribute and market products by farming cooperatives;
  • the Advance Payments Program, governed by the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act, that provides producers with a cash advance on the value of their agricultural products during a specified period; and
  • the Price Pooling Program, also governed by the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act, that facilitates the marketing of agricultural products under cooperative plans by guaranteeing a minimum average price of products sold by marketing agencies.
Sub-Program 1.1.1: AgriStability

Description: AgriStability provides support when producers experience large margin declines. A producer may be able to receive an AgriStability payment when their current year program margin falls below a percentage of their historical reference margin. AgriStability is cost-shared 60:40 by federal, and provincial or territorial governments.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): (Statutory) Grant payments for the AgriStability program and (Statutory) Contribution payments for the AgriStability program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
277,931,550 277,549,818 277,549,818
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
165 165 165
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Short-term impacts of large income losses are mitigated Program participants' farm market revenues as a percentage of total farm market revenues for the 2013 program year 65 March 31, 2016
Short-term impacts of large income losses are mitigated Percentage of producers with gross farm revenue >$10,000 participating in AgriStability for the 2013 program year 50 March 31, 2016
Short-term impacts of large income losses are mitigated Percentage of producers triggering payments where production margins plus AgriStability payments are ≥55% of the reference margin 75 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Under the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework agreement, federal, provincial and territorial governments continue to provide assistance under AgriStability. Starting with the 2013 program year, adjustments were introduced to AgriStability, consistent with the direction of Growing Forward 2, where the program is focused on assisting with disasters and severe market volatility.

Starting in 2015–16, federal, provincial and territorial governments expect to begin collecting performance measurement data on the AgriStability program for the 2013 program year. As part of the performance measurement approach, producer participation in AgriStability and the program's response to disaster events will be monitored to help ensure objectives are being met in an efficient and effective manner.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: AgriInvest

Description: AgriInvest helps producers manage income declines, and provides support for investments to mitigate risks or improve market income. Producers' AgriInvest accounts build as they make annual deposits based on a percentage of their Allowable Net Sales and receive matching contributions from federal, and provincial or territorial governments. AgriInvest is cost-shared 60:40 by federal, and provincial or territorial governments.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): (Statutory) Grant payments for the AgriInvest program and (Statutory) Contribution payments for the AgriInvest program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
156,211,043 155,992,775 155,992,775
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
150 150 151
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Producers have the flexibility in managing financial risks Percentage of producers with gross farm revenue >$10,000 participating in AgriInvest for the 2013 Program Year 75 March 31, 2016
Producers have the flexibility in managing financial risks Percentage of AgriInvest producers triggering AgriStability payments and making withdrawals from their AgriInvest saving accounts for the 2013 Program Year 60 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Under the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework agreement, federal, provincial and territorial governments continue to provide assistance under AgriInvest. Starting with the 2013 program year, adjustments to AgriInvest were introduced, consistent with the direction of Growing Forward 2, where producers assume more responsibility for smaller losses while government assistance is focused on disasters.

Starting in 2015–16, federal, provincial and territorial governments expect to begin collecting performance measurement data on the AgriInvest program for the 2013 program year. As part of the performance measurement approach, analysis on trends in account balances and withdrawals will be conducted to ensure that AgriInvest continues to be an effective mechanism to help manage risk.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: AgriRecovery

Description: AgriRecovery is a disaster-relief framework that allows federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together on a case-by-case basis to assess natural disasters (for example, extreme weather, disease, pests, et cetera) affecting Canadian farmers and respond with targeted, disaster-specific programming when assistance is needed beyond existing programming (AgriStability, AgriInvest, AgriInsurance, Canadian Food Inspection Agency compensation, et cetera). The aim of AgriRecovery is to provide affected producers with assistance to help them take action to mitigate the impacts of the disaster and/or resume business operations as quickly as possible following a disaster event.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): (Statutory) Contribution payments for the Agricultural Disaster Relief program/AgriRecovery.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
122,752,755 122,752,755 122,752,755
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Disaster-affected producers mitigate the impacts of the disaster and/or resume business operations as quickly as possible Percentage of AgriRecovery initiatives where at least 70% of targeted producers, and/or units of production in the targeted regions, participated in the AgriRecovery initiative 70 March 31, 2016
Disaster-affected producers mitigate the impacts of the disaster and/or resume business operations as quickly as possible Percentage of AgriRecovery recipients where AgriRecovery payments played an important role in their recovery from a disaster 75 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Under the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework agreement, federal, provincial and territorial governments continue the use of the AgriRecovery Framework as one of the tools used in disaster situations.

In 2015–16, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will further work already begun with provincial and territorial partners to implement the recommendations from the 2013 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada in an effort to speed up the AgriRecovery process and improve the timeliness of disaster payments. As part of this process, federal, provincial and territorial officials will also be reviewing the performance indicators and targets.

In 2015–16, the Department will also complete an evaluation of the AgriRecovery Framework that will include the outcome of action plans in response to recommendations from past audits and evaluations.

Additionally, departmental officials will continue to work with the Province of Manitoba in 2015–16 on the delivery of the 2014 Canada-Manitoba Forage Shortfall and Transportation Assistance Initiative, as well as with other provinces where AgriRecovery initiatives are put in place to assist producers in recovering from disasters.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: AgriInsurance

Description: AgriInsurance helps producers minimize the economic impacts of production losses caused by adverse weather, diseases and other specified perils. AgriInsurance is an actuarially sound insurance program that uses premiums to fund liabilities. The premiums are cost shared between the federal government, provincial governments and producers. The commodities covered vary by province and continue to expand to cover additional commodities.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): (Statutory) Contribution payments for the AgriInsurance program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
645,338,776 645,338,776 645,338,776
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
19 19 19
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection Program Eligibility: Value of agricultural products for which insurance coverage is offered as a percentage of the value of all agricultural products (excluding livestock) 85 March 31, 2016
Production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection Program Participation: Value of insured production as a percentage of the total value of all agricultural products eligible for insurance (excluding forage, pasture and livestock production) 75 March 31, 2016
Production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection Program Effectiveness: Percentage of producers participating in the program who feel that AgriInsurance is effective in mitigating financial impacts of production losses 70 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

Federal, provincial and territorial governments recognized the importance of AgriInsurance as a risk-management tool and so the program was maintained under the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework agreement.

In 2015–16, governments will continue to look at ways to improve insurance products under the AgriInsurance program to help meet the sector's risk-management needs. For instance, the federal government will continue to work with the provinces to increase the uptake of forage insurance, as well as continue to explore options for livestock mortality insurance.

The Department will also continue to implement recommendations from an internal evaluation from 2012–13, aimed at enhancing insurance plans, improving uptake, and reviewing the policy objectives of the wildlife compensation program.

In addition, administrative processes will be further refined to ensure service standards are met for assessing new provincial plan submissions or enhancements, and for processing payments to provinces.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: AgriRisk

Description: The AgriRisk Initiatives program provides financial and technical assistance to private-sector or industry-led projects to research, develop, implement and deliver new risk management tools including insurance-based tools. The objective of the program is to increase producers' ability to address the risks they face by facilitating the development and adoption of agricultural risk management tools. The AgriRisk Initiatives program will be delivered through time-limited financial and technical assistance for projects undertaking the research and development of potential risk management tools, and support the administrative capacity-building projects for the delivery of these tools. Research and development projects are federal-only funding whereas implementation and delivery projects are cost shared with provinces or territories.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Grant payments for the AgriRisk Initiatives program and Contributions for the AgriRisk Initiatives program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
12,455,806 17,455,806 18,205,806
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
4 4 4
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Industry has increased awareness of current agricultural risk management tools and mitigation strategies and has access to new or expanded business risk management tools Percentage of eligible participants using new tools that have been funded by AgriRisk Initiatives 5 March 31, 2018
Industry has increased awareness of current agricultural risk management tools and mitigation strategies and has access to new or expanded business risk management tools Percentage of projects meeting ≥80% of their project objectives on time and on budget 90 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, through the AgriRisk Initiatives program, will continue to work with industry on research and development projects aimed at increasing the availability of risk-management tools in the sector. In 2015–16, the Department will continue to work with producers and commodity organizations, as well as private sector risk-management experts, to explore and develop new risk-management tools.

In 2015–16, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will work with the provinces to identify and implement cost-shared projects to help better administer new tools in the early years of their operation. The Department will also continue to work with provincial partners in the oversight of the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Agricultural Marketing Programs Act

Description: The Advance Payments Program and the Price Pooling Program are two active federal loan guarantee programs legislated under the authority of the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act. Under the Advance Payments Program, the government guarantees the repayment of the cash advances made to crop and livestock producers by third-party administrators for a specified period of time, based on the value of their agricultural product. These cash advances improve producers' cash flow throughout the year, enabling them to meet their financial obligations and benefit from the best market conditions. Eligible producers can receive an Advance Payments Program advance of up to $400,000 at a preferential interest rate, with the government paying the interest on the first $100,000. Producers repay their advance plus interest, as their product is sold. Target clients are producers of agricultural products as defined under the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act. The Price Pooling Program facilitates the marketing of agricultural products under cooperative plans by guaranteeing a minimum average price of products sold by marketing agencies. This enables marketing agencies to secure financing and to issue initial delivery payments to their members. The government guarantee protects agencies against unanticipated declines in the market price of their products that exceed 35%. Target clients are marketing agencies of agricultural products defined under the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Payments in connection with the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act (S.C., 1997, c. C-34).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
71,995,000 71,995,000 71,995,000
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
32 32 32
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Agricultural producers have improved cash-flow to enable them to make better marketing decisions about their products Number of producers receiving Advance Payments Program advances per production period 28,000 March 31, 2016
Agricultural producers have improved cash-flow to enable them to make better marketing decisions about their products Dollar value of Advance Payments Program advances issued per production period (billions) 2 March 31, 2016
Agricultural producers have improved cash-flow to enable them to make better marketing decisions about their products Advance Payments Program defaults as a percentage of total Advance Payments Program advances taken per production period 3 March 31, 2016
Marketing of agricultural products under cooperative plans is facilitated by guaranteeing minimum average prices of products sold by marketing agencies Guarantee price provided through the Price Pooling Program as a percentage of average market price 65 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Bill C-18, tabled in Parliament on December 9, 2013, included amendments to the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act to streamline administration, improve access and enhance flexibility of the Advance Payments Program. These amendments were the result of industry consultations aimed at improving the Program.

In 2015–16, upon Royal Assent, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will work to implement the amendments to the Act as quickly as possible, including making the necessary regulatory changes. Provisions that do not require regulatory amendment will be implemented soon after Royal Assent and the remaining provisions will be put in place once regulatory amendments are made. This will be done while also continuing to deliver the Advance Payments Program, ensuring producers can access advances throughout the implementation process.

In 2015–16, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will also complete an internal evaluation of the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act and an internal audit of the Advance Payments Program to ensure the Program continues to operate efficiently and effectively for Canadian producers. In addition, the Department will continue to support the marketing of agricultural products through the Price Pooling Program.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Canadian Agricultural Loans Act

Description: The Canadian Agricultural Loans Act is a legislated financial loan guarantee program that improves availability of credit to farmers and agricultural co-operatives. Under the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act program, the Government of Canada guarantees to financial institutions repayment of the loans that they make to farmers and agricultural co-operatives for eligible purposes. Farmers use these loans to establish, improve, and develop their farms, while agricultural co-operatives use loans to process, distribute, or market the products of farming.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Loan guarantees under the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. 25 (3rd Supp.)).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
14,744,566 14,744,566 14,744,566
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
4 4 4
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Agricultural farmers and co-operatives have access to affordable capital to make investments in their agricultural operations Dollar value of registered loans awarded by lending institutions during the fiscal year (millions) 137 March 31, 2016
Agricultural farmers and co-operatives have access to affordable capital to make investments in their agricultural operations Number of loans made to beginning farmers 217 March 31, 2016
Agricultural farmers and co-operatives have access to affordable capital to make investments in their agricultural operations Defaulted loans as a percentage of the value of total loans at the end of the year Less than 1 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

In April 2014, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada completed an internal evaluation and legislative review of the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act. The recommendations of the evaluation pointed to the need for increased promotion and awareness efforts for the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act program to improve uptake by producers and financial institutions alike. The review's recommendations were fully addressed in a management response and action plan, including a communications strategy targeting awareness, strengthened lender guidelines and a new online system for lenders to register loans.

Program 1.2: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems

Description: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada supports and equips industry for commercial success in order to maximize the sector's long-term profitability and competitiveness. In pursuing this objective and in close collaboration with the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada ensures access to markets, facilitates industry-led activities aimed at developing international markets and assurance systems, and provides information to help position industry to capitalize on market opportunities both at home and abroad. Assurance systems include systems, standards and tools for food safety, biosecurity, traceability, surveillance, animal welfare, and other market attributes.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
194,586,263 194,586,263 173,108,735 171,426,251
Differences in planned spending are primarily due to the planned spending reductions for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program.
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
386 386 385
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector is responsive to market opportunities and risks Growth in total exports of agriculture and agri-food, including seafood (billions of dollars) 50.3 December 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Recognizing the importance of global markets to the profitability and prosperity of Canada's agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector, the Department will continue to: advocate for the removal of trade barriers and improved market access through bilateral, regional and multilateral negotiations; undertake key sectoral development activities; and support the creation of assurance systems. In partnership with provinces and territories, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will help the sector compete by providing market information, research, analysis, and policy advice. On issues such as pest management, it will help develop technologies and techniques aimed at reducing risks to the environment and human health, while collaborating with industry and regulatory agencies to improve the regulatory processes. Improvements in competitiveness will lead to increased exports, greater profitability and more jobs for Canadians.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Trade and Market Expansion

Description: The Trade and Market Expansion program, funded by existing departmental resources and Growing Forward 2, enhances Canada's market presence by promoting science-based trade rules, re-opening, maintaining and expanding markets, and pursuing Free Trade Agreements with key trading partners, recognizing the importance of global markets to the profitability of Canada's agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector. To fully capture the benefits of Free Trade Agreements and increased access, the Trade and Market Expansion program also provides resources and tools, such as market intelligence, a trade commissioner service and Canada Brand tools and coordination that enable industry to seize new market opportunities and build commercial success.

The program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Grants to foreign recipients for participation in international organizations supporting agriculture.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
31,935,228 32,027,824 32,126,608
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
125 125 125
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian agriculture and agri-food and agri-based product exporters are successful in seizing new market opportunities and in achieving commercial success Value of Canadian agriculture and agri-food exports to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries (billions of dollars) 36.1 December 31, 2017
Canadian agriculture and agri-food and agri-based product exporters are successful in seizing new market opportunities and in achieving commercial success Value of Canadian agriculture and agri-food export to non-Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries (billions of dollars) 14.2 December 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

In collaboration with federal partners, provinces and industry, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada helps to resolve or advance Canadian trade issues and to open, maintain and expand markets for Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products, thus creating new opportunities for the sector. The Department will focus market access efforts on markets and cross-sector issues that hold the most potential for the Canadian industry.

In support of the federal government's ambitious trade negotiations agenda, the Department will lead the agricultural components of bilateral, regional and multilateral free trade negotiations, including those at the World Trade Organization. It will seek the elimination of tariff and non-tariff barriers affecting agriculture products.

Technological advancements and the rise in non-tariff barriers to trade have resulted in an increasingly complex and challenging international marketplace. The Department will continue to advocate for science-based and transparent rules and regulations at the World Trade Organization, at international standards-setting bodies, and at multilateral and bilateral meetings. Science-based approaches are key if trade liberalization is to fully contribute to economic growth and opportunity, while helping to ensure food security.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to support industry in capturing the benefits of free trade agreements and increased access to markets. This support will be provided through market information and intelligence reports, logistical and operational support for industry participation in eight major international trade shows, leadership in multidisciplinary international market engagement teams, and front-line assistance through specialized knowledge and an in-depth understanding of local conditions via the Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioner Service.

In view of the transformative vision for agriculture set out in Growing Forward 2, the Canada Brand Program has shifted direction to promote greater industry leadership and action in fostering commercial success. In this regard, the Department's Canada Brand function will be limited to maintaining Brand membership, managing logos and graphics, and making available key messaging on sector advantages that differentiate Canadian food from competing products.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Sector Engagement and Development

Description: The Sector Engagement and Development program, funded by existing departmental resources and Growing Forward 2, seeks to improve the sector's competitiveness and market success. Regional and sector specialists work to maintain and expand working relationships through collaboration with provinces and territories, national and regional agricultural and food associations, individual companies and value chain members, in order to develop knowledge and address issues of importance facing the sector, including market and regulatory issues.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
21,990,865 22,079,613 22,188,844
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
161 161 161
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Agriculture, agri-food and agri-based value chains are able to adapt to industry challenges and opportunities Value of food and beverage shipments (billions of dollars) 105.37 December 31, 2017
Agriculture, agri-food and agri-based value chains are able to adapt to industry challenges and opportunities Value of farm market receipts (billions of dollars) 52.6 December 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will seek to enhance the competitiveness and commercial success of the sector by supporting adaptation and responsiveness to changing and emerging international and domestic opportunities and issues. This will be achieved by collecting and analyzing market data and information, cultivating strong industry relations, and undertaking sectoral development activities.

By providing market information, regional intelligence and sectoral expertise, the Department will continue to support decision making by Canadian producers, food processors, industry organizations, and governments through reports on market data, analysis and forecasts, and sector performance.

Moreover, building relationships with industry organizations and firms, and providing analysis, policy and technical advice on regulatory, market, and science and innovation issues are crucial to building industry capacity to address priority issues. Through industry-led Value Chain Round Tables, and through regional interaction with industry, industry-government collaboration will be enhanced, helping improve industry's capacity and adaptability.

Finally, sector development activities to be undertaken include working with industry to assist in the resolution of industry-wide strategic and transactional issues, resolving technical and trade issues, and overseeing federal, provincial and territorial agreements to ensure that federal policies and initiatives reflect and support industry and provincial and territorial priorities.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Market Development

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program supports the agricultural sector by providing resources through matching contribution agreements to ensure that industry has the capacity to take advantage of gains made in market access, as well as to seize new opportunities presented by consumer preferences and emerging food trends, in order to be competitive in domestic and export markets. For example, Market Development supports Canada's agriculture and agri-food industry to build and deliver on long-term international strategies, to gain and expand international recognition in key markets and enhance market opportunities for Canadian agriculture and agri-food products. This ensures that Canada is well positioned to succeed in key markets and respond to consumer demands and global competition.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contribution payments for the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
22,948,606 22,948,606 22,948,606
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
16 16 16
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The agriculture sector is supported to maintain the visibility of Canadian sectors/products as well as to maintain its capacity to identify and seize market development opportunities that contribute to its trade competitiveness Cumulative number of market development and promotional products/events undertaken under the program aimed at new markets 350 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

Under the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada continues to support market development activities as part of the Market Development stream of the AgriMarketing Program. This Program supports activities in both existing and new markets to maintain and enhance industry's competitiveness by connecting Canadian agri-businesses to key international markets. In this respect, funds are made available to national producer, processor and exporter associations, along with small- and medium-sized enterprises, to implement long-term, international market-development strategies. This support will enhance the competitiveness of the industry in building, promoting and expanding domestic and export markets by contributing to industry-led promotional and market development activities. These promotional activities are aimed at maintaining the visibility of Canadian sectors, the advantages of Canadian products, as well as to differentiate Canadian producers from competitors from other major agricultural exporting countries. The Department will continue to improve its capacity to assess the program to help ensure maximum returns to Canadian agri-businesses.

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Assurance Systems

Description: The Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector is supported in its endeavours to prevent and control risks to the animal/plant resource base, provide safe food and meet new market demands for assurance. Federal programming under Growing Forward 2 supports national organizations in developing national assurance systems, standards and tools, which include food safety systems, biosecurity standards, traceability systems, animal and plant health surveillance systems, and market attribute standards.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contribution payments for the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
19,236,820 20,236,820 20,236,820
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
20 20 20
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The Canadian agriculture and agri-food industry has the tools available to implement assurance systems that respond to consumer, buyer and market demands; to gain and maintain market access; and to protect against threats to plant and animal health Cumulative number of assurance systems and standard tools completed 43 March 31, 2018
Implementation of assurance systems and standards by producers and agri-businesses Cumulative number of assurance systems/standards activities undertaken by producers and agri-businesses under Growing Forward 2 Federal/Provincial/Territorial Cost-shared Programming 13,200 March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Food safety and plant and animal health remain key factors in ensuring industry competitiveness and domestic and international market access. Under Growing Forward 2, AgriMarketing Program's Assurance Systems Stream continues to focus on these factors while also seeking to support broader, market-driven assurance systems to help the sector secure markets and meet new and emerging buyer demands. In this regard, the Program supports national organizations to develop assurance systems, standards and tools in response to consumer and market demands for food safety and other attributes.

Under Growing Forward 2, provinces and territories are responsible for funding to implement assurance systems as set out in the federal, provincial and territorial bilateral agreements described in Sub-Program 1.2.5 Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cost-shared Market Development and Competitiveness. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada delivers the Assurance System Stream that complements provincial and territorial cost-shared programs, where the benefits can be attributed to all provinces.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to help industry develop farm-level and service-sector national biosecurity standards, on-farm and post-farm food-safety systems, and traceability systems through the AgriMarketing Program's Assurance Systems Stream. Of special note, the Department is working with provincial and territorial governments and industry to develop the Canadian Agri-Traceability Services, a single, national livestock traceability data service. In addition, it will help establish new surveillance systems for plant and animal diseases and standards systems for assuring quality attributes important to key markets. Also, the Department will assist industry efforts in other market-related areas, such as the integration of assurance systems. This work will be undertaken in collaboration with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, which will focus on areas such as food-safety recognition, biosecurity standards and regulations for traceability.

Sub-Program 1.2.5: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Market Development and Competitiveness

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program provides support for provincial and territorial activities aimed at assisting the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector in maintaining and creating market-based opportunities for individual farms and firms and providing industry with the knowledge and tools to compete at home and abroad. Specific provincial or territorial programs support the sector in identifying new domestic and global opportunities and markets that enhance competitiveness and prosperity as well as support the sector in its endeavors to prevent and control risks to the animal or plant resource base, provide safe food and meet new market demands for assurance.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Competitiveness and Market Development under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
61,201,028 61,201,028 61,201,028
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The sector is increasing its use of market-based knowledge and tools to increase market access Cumulative number of assurance systems/standards activities undertaken by agri-businesses under Growing Forward 2 Federal/Provincial/Territorial Cost-shared Programming 15,000 March 31, 2019
The sector is increasing its use of market-based knowledge and tools to increase market access Percentage of clients who indicate that their participation in Growing Forward 2 Cost-shared Programs allowed them to capture new markets 55 March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada funds provincial and territorial initiatives through the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework agreement. Each province and territory has the flexibility to design and implement programming that is tailored to meet diverse regional needs. Anticipated cost-shared activities include: developing and sharing market intelligence; providing advisory and consulting services on export development activities; supporting training and awareness activities for specific assurance systems; and helping industry to implement and adopt tools and best management practices related to assurance systems and standards.

This program includes environmental activities related to the prevention and control of risks to the animal or plant resource base, the provision of safe food, and meeting new market demands for assurance. As it requires assurance systems and standards, the performance indicator is the same as that for Sub-Program 1.2.4.

Sub-Program 1.2.6: Pest Management: Pesticides Minor Use Program

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program improves grower access to new minor uses of pesticides. Pesticide residue, efficacy and crop tolerance studies are conducted to generate and to inform regulatory data packages, which are submitted to Health Canada for new minor uses of pesticide products. In addition, collaborative work with our colleagues in the United States results in joint pesticide submissions to the regulatory agencies of both countries and the simultaneous availability of new pesticide minor uses in both countries. The increased availability of new minor use pesticides prevents trade barriers with countries where these products are already available.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
10,281,045 10,281,045 10,281,045
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
49 49 49
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Regulatory submissions sent to Pest Management Regulatory Agency, Health Canada for new minor uses of pesticides Number of submissions of packaged, research project information and data in support of regulated, minor use pesticides 40 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Jointly delivered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Health Canada, the Pesticides Minor Use Program will continue to work with growers and their organizations, pesticide companies, provincial officials, and counterparts in the United States to prioritize pest problems, identify potential pesticide control solutions, and to generate required data to support the registration of the new minor uses of pesticides in Canada. The Department will also continue to work with its United States counterparts to further harmonize data generation procedures, and draft regulatory reports to facilitate evaluation by regulatory agencies of both countries. New minor uses of pesticides made available to Canadian growers will: reduce yield losses due to pests, thus protecting grower investments; help prevent trade barriers with countries where targeted pesticides are already registered by establishing maximum-residue limits associated with the new pesticide uses; and improve growers' competitive parity with those in the United States.

Sub-Program 1.2.7: Pest Management: Pesticides Risk Reduction Program

Description: Under the Pesticide Risk Reduction Program, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada develops technologies, tools (including biopesticides), and techniques aimed at reducing the risk to the environment and human health posed by pesticide use. The increased availability of biopesticides and reduced risk technologies, products and techniques, contribute to sustainable agriculture. Collaboration with counterparts at Health Canada assists with targeting reduced risk alternatives to pesticides whose registration is being phased out due to toxicity.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2,443,300 2,443,300 2,443,300
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Increased awareness of, and access to, safer pest management products and practices Number of reduced risk pest management products and practices developed and communicated to growers 5 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to work with stakeholders to identify and support pesticide risk-reduction solutions for priority issues. The Department will develop risk-reduction action plans and support research leading to reduced-risk pest-management tools and approaches to address potential risks posed by pesticides. It will support a grower-led national biopesticides priority-setting exercise and will prepare regulatory submissions to register selected biopesticides products. It will also collaborate with Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency to support alternatives to pesticides that are being phased out. In addition, the Department will support research to fill key knowledge and technology gaps in pest management and will use communication tools and demonstration projects to inform growers of program results.

Sub-Program 1.2.8: Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program

Description: The Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program reimburses specific costs incurred by the Canadian Wheat Board associated with its transition to a voluntary grain marketing organization, which it became on August 1, 2012. The Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program will provide up to $349 million of grant and contribution payments to the Canadian Wheat Board in order to cover cost items related to the removal of its single desk selling authority for Western Canadian wheat and barley. They include costs of right-sizing of the Canadian Wheat Board, such as settling the Canadian Wheat Board's monopoly-era pension and benefits plans and some severance costs; legacy debts; the cost of mitigating or terminating long-term logistical contracts entered into during the Canadian Wheat Board's monopoly; and other transition costs.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Grant payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program and Contribution payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
24,549,371 1,890,499 0
Planned Spending for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program decreases each fiscal year as the majority of the support was provided to the Canadian Wheat Board in 2012–13 as it became a voluntary grain marketing organization, giving Western Canadian farmers freedom to market their wheat and barley on the open market.
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
1 1 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The Canadian Wheat Board is in a financial position to successfully privatize Number of completed program elements for which the Canadian Wheat Board has received transition funding
Note: A program element describes the different categories of eligible costs. The eligible costs have finite terms and parameters that define what is eligible within the funding agreements
9 March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

In 2012, the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program was announced in response to the Marketing Freedom for Grain Farmers Act that received Royal Assent on December 15, 2011. The Act removed the Canadian Wheat Board's marketing monopoly for Western wheat and barley as of August 1, 2012. The Canadian Wheat Board, which continues under the Act as a voluntary marketing entity for up to five years, is tasked with developing a commercialization plan for privatization. The objective of the Program is to assist the Canadian Wheat Board with costs related to its transition to a voluntary marketing entity.

The Marketing Freedom for Grain Farmers Act requires the Canadian Wheat Board to present an application for continuance no later than July 31, 2016. Under the authority of the Act, the Board may be commercialized or, if a viable plan to commercialize is not presented, it may be wound-up.

The Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs Program aligns with the Government of Canada's commitment to providing farmers with the freedom to choose either the Canadian Wheat Board as a voluntary pooling entity or another grain company to sell their grain. Budget 2012 reaffirmed the Government's commitment to "a smooth transition for farmers, which includes a viable, voluntary Canadian Wheat Board as part of an open and competitive Canadian grain market."

Program 1.3: Farm Products Council of Canada

Description: Established under the Farm Products Agencies Act, the Farm Products Council of Canada is an oversight body that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (the Minister). The Farm Products Agencies Act provides for the creation of national marketing agencies, which are not subject to the Competition Act, as well as promotion and research agencies. The Farm Products Council of Canada supervises these agencies, and works with them to ensure that the supply management system for poultry and eggs and promotion-research activities for beef cattle work in the balanced interest of all stakeholders, from producers to consumers, and can evolve to respond to current and future challenges. The Farm Products Council of Canada also provides advice and recommendations to the Minister, collaborates with provincial supervisory boards and actively works with the Department and Agriculture and Agri-Food Portfolio organizations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
3,028,779 3,028,779 3,028,779 3,028,779
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
24 24 24
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The domestic market shares of Canadian producers of chicken, eggs, hatching eggs and turkey are stable or increasing The percentage of the domestic chicken market supplied by Canadian producers of chicken 80 March 31, 2016
The domestic market shares of Canadian producers of chicken, eggs, hatching eggs and turkey are stable or increasing The percentage of the domestic egg market supplied by Canadian producers of eggs 80 March 31, 2016
The domestic market shares of Canadian producers of chicken, eggs, hatching eggs and turkey are stable or increasing The percentage of the domestic hatching eggs market supplied by Canadian producers of hatching eggs 80 March 31, 2016
The domestic market shares of Canadian producers of chicken, eggs, hatching eggs and turkey are stable or increasing The percentage of the domestic turkey market supplied by Canadian producers of turkey 80 March 31, 2016
Consumer price variations for chicken, eggs and turkey are more stable than those of other competing meats The year-over-year consumer price variation for chicken is within plus or minus 5 percentage points of the year-over-year consumer price variation for other fresh or frozen meats 5 March 31, 2016
Consumer price variations for chicken, eggs and turkey are more stable than those of other competing meats The year-over-year consumer price variation for eggs is within plus or minus 5 percentage points of the year-over-year consumer price variation for other fresh or frozen meats 5 March 31, 2016
Consumer price variations for chicken, eggs and turkey are more stable than those of other competing meats The year-over-year consumer price variation for turkey is within plus or minus 5 percentage points of the year-over-year consumer price variation for other fresh or frozen meats 5 March 31, 2016
Consumer price variations for chicken, eggs and turkey are consistent with those of food in general The year-over-year consumer price variation for chicken is within plus or minus 10 percentage points of the year-over-year consumer price variation for food in general 10 March 31, 2016
Consumer price variations for chicken, eggs and turkey are consistent with those of food in general The year-over-year consumer price variation for eggs is within plus or minus 10 percentage points of the year-over-year consumer price variation for food in general 10 March 31, 2016
Consumer price variations for chicken, eggs and turkey are consistent with those of food in general The year-over-year consumer price variation for turkey is within plus or minus 10 percentage points of the year-over-year consumer price variation for food in general 10 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

The Farm Products Council of Canada will continue to work with and supervise the agencies established under the Farm Products Agencies Act: Canada Beef, Canadian Hatching Egg Producers, Chicken Farmers of Canada, Egg Farmers of Canada, and Turkey Farmers of Canada. The Council will also continue to inquire into the merits of requests by industry groups to establish promotion and research agencies.

Introducing its new Strategic Plan 2015-2018, the Farm Products Council of Canada will focus its effort on ensuring that marketing, promotion and research systems are transparent, have the flexibility needed to respond to current and future challenges, and are managed in a manner that can withstand public scrutiny. To do so, the Council will continue to foster a better understanding of partners' roles and responsibilities within the systems. It will also provide information on promotion and research agencies as a tool for commodity groups to take ownership of their research priorities and to promote their products. The Council will also strive to engage provincial supervisory boards in maintaining and promoting an efficient and competitive system. It will also work to improve communications and develop its internal expertise.

The Farm Products Council of Canada will assess the performance of the marketing systems by measuring the health of the domestic industry for supply-managed products, in terms of domestic market shares. The systems' impact on Canadian consumers will also be assessed to ensure that price variations for supply-managed commodities are coherent with those of food products that are not subject to supply management.

Strategic Outcome 2: An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Sector innovation and sustainability include the development and commercialization of value-added agricultural-based products, knowledge-based production systems, processes and technologies, and equipping the sector with improved business and management skills and strategies to capture opportunities and to manage change. Such innovation and adaptability are vital for ongoing growth and improvement in the productivity, profitability and sustainability of Canada's agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.

Program 2.1: Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability

Description: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada contributes to innovation and sustainability of the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector through science and associated activities designed to improve profitability in new and existing products, services, processes and markets. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides research, development and knowledge transfer that enhances the sector's resiliency, fosters new areas of opportunity for the sector and supports sector competitiveness as well as coordinated and informed decision making. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada promotes integrated planning, engaging industry, government and academia, and collaborative action to accelerate the flow of science and technology along the innovation continuum in support of industry defined strategies for future success. Farmers, agri-entrepreneurs and agri-based enterprises are supported in their efforts to adopt new technologies and commercialize new products and services. Pathfinding and transformational research help to define future sustainable opportunities and prepare the sector for emerging opportunities and challenges.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
537,550,506 537,550,506 530,833,077 531,076,601
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
2,294 2,345 2,376
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Agriculture and agri-food sector that utilizes science to improve agriculture's efficiency, increase availability of new products and contribute to the Canadian economy Agriculture Net value-added (billions of dollars)
The agriculture value-added account is designed to provide an annual measure of the value of income generated from the production of agricultural goods and services. The numbers are used to assess the state of the agricultural industry and to form the basis of various policy options
12.3 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to generate new knowledge and to help the sector adopt and commercialize innovative agricultural, agri-food and agri-based products, processes and practices that enhance economic growth and sustainability. The Department will continue to target research, development and knowledge transfer activities aligned with its sector science strategies. The emphasis will be on four common, cross-cutting strategic objectives: increasing agricultural productivity; improving environmental sustainability; enhancing attributes for food and non-food uses; and addressing threats to the agriculture and agri-food value chain.

In 2015–16, the Department will continue to support industry-led applied research specific to the needs of the agricultural sector. Growing Forward 2 Agri-Science Projects and Agri-Science Clusters are ongoing initiatives that include work by departmental researchers, as well as government contribution funding to industry. Also, contribution funding to industry continues in 2015–16 to support Beneficial Management Practices to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions under the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will also continue to provide repayable contributions to private industry to help demonstrate, commercialize and adopt innovative agri-based products, technologies, processes, and services under the AgriInnovation Program's Enabling Commercialization and Adoption Stream. This Stream moves innovation to the market.

These combined efforts will lead to products, processes and practices that enhance economic benefits for all stakeholders, and also support a more sustainable agriculture and agri-food sector, by advancing the understanding of Canadian bioresources, and protecting and conserving genetic diversity.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will fund provincial and territorial initiatives via the Growing Forward 2 policy framework. These initiatives include supporting research projects, providing assistance to the sector to act on commercialization and demonstration opportunities, and supporting environmental risk-mitigation activities. When projects are completed, recipients are expected to have developed a variety of innovative products, technologies, processes, or services that can be introduced to market.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Science Supporting an Innovative and Sustainable Sector

Description: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada conducts longer term core research and development work to advance the understanding of: the resource base upon which agriculture depends, threats to Canadian agriculture production, mechanisms to protect and conserve Canadian bioresources and genetic diversity, and future new opportunities for the sector. This program also maintains a strong network of world-class research centres and offices across the country with scientific expertise to meet the research needs of existing and emerging agricultural commodity groups, and to participate in collaborative partnerships with industry, academia, non-governmental organizations and others that undertake research aimed at yield enhancement, input reductions, prevention of diseases or pests, market access and risk mitigation, and development of new areas of opportunity for the sector.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Grants to foreign recipients for participation in international organizations supporting agriculture.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
207,145,079 211,484,881 211,439,364
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
1,575 1,588 1,595
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Knowledge and understanding of: the agricultural resource, threats to Canadian agriculture production, mechanisms to protect and conserve Canadian bioresources and genetic diversity, and efficient integrated production systems for the scientific community and ultimately the sector Number of peer-reviewed publications and technical project reports produced for research projects conducted under this activity 300 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

As discussed in the Planning Highlights for Program 2.1, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will focus its research and development efforts in areas that contribute to the achievement of sector science strategies with four common, cross-cutting strategic objectives. The Department will continue to direct these efforts to meet the needs of Canadian producers and manufacturers with a focus on building domestic competitive advantages, while also pursuing international relationships and partnerships.

Through the federal Genomics Research and Development Initiative, the Department will continue to advance knowledge and technology to support a sustainable and safe food and feed supply. It will also continue to introduce crop platforms for the next generation of bio-products. Projects will focus on identifying and extracting genes for desirable traits to create value-added opportunities for Canadian crops, to enhance their resiliency in the face of potentially catastrophic abiotic and biotic stresses, and to maximize sector profitability. Bioinformatics and other tools will be developed to maximize opportunities presented by genomics-based research. For example, plant breeding will be enhanced through improved access to biological materials and datasets, leading to accelerated commercialization by industry of new crop varieties for Canadian farmers. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will also continue to participate in two interdepartmental shared priority projects under the Genomics Research and Development Initiative on food and water safety, and quarantine and invasive species.

The Department will continue to protect national collections of biological materials, including the taxonomical collections of living organisms of all kingdoms, the plant and farm animal genebanks, the digitization of specimens and related data and information, and the imaging of certain primary type specimens. Scientific research results from digitized specimens support activities of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the National Identification Service. These continued efforts will also provide fundamental knowledge and materials to support research, agricultural production and trade.

Plant Gene Resources of Canada, the country's national gene seed bank managed by the Department, will put major emphasis on improving the state of crops' wild relatives and wheat germplasm collections. The World Base Collection of Oat will be a priority for regeneration efforts (growing of new seed as old seed dies over time).

At Canadian Animal Genetic Resources, the database will be made accessible to the public. There will be an enhanced focus on sharing biodiversity data through the government's Open Data and Open Science initiatives, as well as biodiversity-related portals such as the Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility, the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Federal Geospatial Platform.

Planning will begin for a general assessment of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's collections, including policies, procedures and facilities, to help protect these resources for the future.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Research Accelerating Innovation

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program is designed to address emerging science-based requirements of the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector by generating and providing access to scientific knowledge that helps the industry to: identify and mitigate risks to agriculture and agri-food production; enhance the safety of the food system; sustainably increase its productivity to improve its bottom line through more efficient use of inputs; enhance the resilience of the sector to a changing climate; and to capture market opportunities. Objectives of this program include: conduct innovative research to understand key challenges and opportunities facing the sector; transform scientific knowledge into agricultural products, processes and practices that improve competitiveness; promote research to understand the key environmental sustainability challenges facing Canadian farmers; encourage the transformation of scientific knowledge into agricultural practices that improve the environmental sustainability and profitability of farming operations; support scientific measurement and analysis of the environmental sustainability performance of the sector that will facilitate competitiveness; and work with industry to target Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada efforts towards key business risks and opportunities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
95,695,154 95,946,502 96,185,661
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
494 515 527
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
New products, processes and technologies are available for transfer to the sector that are relevant to: environmental sustainability of the sector, the minimization of catastrophic threats to crops, the optimization of livestock efficiencies, and the health and safety of food Number of new products, processes and technologies available for transfer to stakeholders 51 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to conduct scientific research and development projects aligned to the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework to further the understanding of key challenges and opportunities facing the agriculture and agri-food sector. The Department will also help transform scientific knowledge into products, processes and practices to improve the sector's competitiveness, profitability and sustainability. Additionally, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will commence, in 2015–16, a series of new research projects aligned to Growing Forward 2 and selected during 2014–15 for the soundness and quality of their science through a proposal review process. These projects will provide the sector with access to scientific knowledge that will help industry identify and mitigate production risks, while supporting sustainability considerations in pursuing improved productivity and new market opportunities.

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Research, Development and Knowledge Transfer

Description: The objective of industry-led Research, Development and Knowledge Transfer under Growing Forward 2 is to accelerate the pace of innovation in the sector by supporting industry-led research, development and knowledge creation and transfer activities of innovative agricultural products, technologies, practices, processes and services in the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector to increase market opportunities, foster innovation, industry investment and leadership. This program provides non-repayable contributions to recipients and research support for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada pay and non-pay operating funds to conduct approved applied science activities in support of a project.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contribution payments for the AgriInnovation program under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
101,601,733 95,968,594 96,018,476
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
199 220 232
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The sector develops or advances knowledge and technologies for industry uptake for commercialization or adoption Number of peer-reviewed scientific publications produced in the sector from 2013 to 2018 under the Industry-led Research and Development and Knowledge Transfer stream of the AgriInnovation Program 1,000 March 31, 2018
Sector has additional capacity to develop knowledge and technologies Number of newly trained, highly qualified personnel in the sector from 2013 to 2018 under the Industry-led Research and Development and Knowledge Transfer stream of the AgriInnovation Program 260 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

Research activities are expected to result in innovations and new knowledge presented in peer-reviewed scientific publications. Additional capacity in the sector will also be developed in the form of university students gaining skills while working on projects and obtaining graduate degrees.

The knowledge transfer component of this program may include written and electronic products (for example, technical manuals and online decision support tools) and outreach, such as demonstration sites, field days, organized tours, and participation in industry events.

New technologies, along with knowledge transfer activities, are expected to result in innovations being adopted in the agricultural sector.

An evaluation of research, development and knowledge transfer science programming under Growing Forward was completed in June 2011. The evaluation concluded that there is an ongoing need for the federal government to support research and innovation in the pre-commercialization phase. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has implemented an action plan to address recommendations and will continue in 2015–16 to review its processes to gain efficiencies where possible.

Sub-Program 2.1.4: Enabling Commercialization and Adoption

Description:The objective of Enabling Commercialization and Adoption under Growing Forward 2 is to accelerate the demonstration, commercialization and/or adoption of innovative agri-based products, technologies, processes or services to increase sector competitiveness across the value chain. This program provides repayable contributions for industry-led agri-based commercialization and adoption projects as well as demonstration projects aimed at facilitating the commercialization or adoption of agri-innovations. Funding is provided for activities including construction; purchase and installation of equipment; training; and marketing, where it forms a minor component of a project. Eligible recipients are for-profit organizations.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contribution payments for the AgriInnovation program under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
26,708,867 26,708,867 26,708,867
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
12 12 12
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The sector has access to government and private investment capital to support demonstration, commercialization and adoption of innovative technologies, processes, products, and services Dollar value of private sector investments under the Enabling Commercialization and Adoption stream of the AgriInnovation Program from 2013 to 2018 (millions of dollars) 118.5 March 31, 2018
The sector develops the capacity to commercialize products, technologies, processes or services Number of innovative products, technologies, processes or services supported by the program that enter the market under the Enabling Commercialization and Adoption stream of the AgriInnovation Program from 2013 to 2018 54 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

Government funding alleviates some of the risk associated with commercialization projects, which helps recipients secure additional financing for their projects. When projects are completed, recipients will have developed a variety of innovative products, technologies, processes, or services that will enter the market. In 2015–16, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue its due diligence with regard to proposals submitted by the industry. Agreements will be developed with successful applicants for demonstration and commercialization projects.

Sub-Program 2.1.5: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Research, Adoption and Commercialization

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program provides funding for provincial and territorial activities aimed at accelerating the pace of innovation in the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector. The programming supports research and development activities and facilitates demonstration and commercialization in order to enhance the productivity, competitiveness, economic growth and adaptability of the sector, and assists in capturing opportunities for the sector in domestic and global markets.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Innovation under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
63,718,708 63,718,708 63,718,708
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The sector has access to new agri-related products, practices and technology Cumulative number of new products/technologies/practices/ processes evaluated, assessed, and/or demonstrated under Growing Forward 2 Federal/Provincial/ Territorial Cost-shared programming 1,300 March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada funds provincial and territorial initiatives through the Growing Forward 2 agricultural policy framework agreement. With regard to this program, each province and territory has the flexibility to design and implement programming that is tailored to meet diverse regional needs. Anticipated cost-shared activities include supporting research projects and providing assistance to the sector to act on commercialization opportunities.

Sub-Program 2.1.6: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Environment

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program provides support for provincial and territorial activities aimed at supporting the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based sector and its businesses to assess and respond to priority environmental risks and manage the natural resource base sustainably. The programming is mainly designed to minimize and mitigate impacts and risks to the environment by maintaining or improving the quality of soil, water, air, and biodiversity; ensuring the long-term health and sustainability of natural resources used for agricultural production; and supporting the long-term economic and environmental viability of the agriculture industry.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Innovation under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
37,005,525 37,005,525 37,005,525
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
3 3 3
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The sector is taking actions to minimize environmental risks and is using inputs efficiently Cumulative number of Beneficial Management Practices implemented under Growing Forward 2 Federal/Provincial/Territorial Cost-shared programming 17,600 March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Each province and territory has the flexibility under this Growing Forward 2 program to design and implement initiatives tailored to meet diverse regional needs. Anticipated cost-shared activities include support for environmental farm plans to identify environmental risks and risk mitigation activities; and the implementation of proven environmental Beneficial Management Practices, such as farmyard runoff controls and erosion control structures.

Sub-Program 2.1.7: Agricultural Greenhouse Gases

Description: The Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program provides contribution funding to the agriculture industry, provincial and territorial governments and academia for projects to undertake research on greenhouse gas mitigation and make new mitigation technologies and Beneficial Management Practices available to farmers. The Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program represents Canada's contribution to the Global Research Alliance on agricultural greenhouse gases, an international alliance aimed at increasing collaboration in agricultural research on greenhouse gas mitigation and Beneficial Management Practices.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contributions in support of the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
5,675,440 0 0
The Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program sunsets at the end of 2015–16.
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
4 0 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Greenhouse gas mitigation information and technologies are made available to farmers Number of new Beneficial Management Practices demonstrated through field days and workshops under the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program from 2011 to 2016 12 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

The Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program is now a mature program with funded projects that will help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to work with funding recipients to ensure that projects progress on schedule. It will monitor recipient reports to ensure that Beneficial Management Practices are demonstrated and that information on greenhouse gases mitigation is broadly shared.

A recently completed evaluation of the Program confirmed the ongoing need for agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation research. In 2015–16, the Department will complete its action plan that addresses the evaluation's recommendations, including the review of program processes.

Program 2.2: Industry Capacity

Description: This program builds capacity of the sector and businesses to sustainably succeed in a market-driven and competitive world. The program encourages the use of sound business management practices, while also enabling businesses in the sector to understand their financial situation, be profitable and invest where needed. It provides for enhanced participation by young or new entrants, First Nations clients, and clients in specific sub-sectors in transition. The program also supports the sector and its businesses to improve access to key infrastructure.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
70,990,651 70,990,651 70,973,522 66,112,483
Differences in planned spending are primarily due to the sunsetting of the Churchill Port Utilisation Program at the end of 2016–17.
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
210 167 139
There is a decrease in the Full-Time Equivalents each fiscal year as the Community Pastures Program is scheduled to sunset at the end of 2017–18.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The sector is increasing its ability to be resilient and self-sustaining Maintain and/or increase the percentage of farms with high free cash flow 55 March 31, 2028
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to help businesses succeed sustainably in a market-driven and competitive world by encouraging the use of sound business management practices. It will also enable businesses to understand their financial situations, be profitable and invest where needed. For example, through Fostering Business Development and Farm Debt Mediation Service, the Industry Capacity program will help enhance participants' financial management. In addition, the Department will help the agricultural sector create approximately 45 career-related work internships, for up to 12 months, for post-secondary graduates in the areas of agriculture, agri-food, agri-food science, and veterinary medicine through the Career Focus Program, which is part of Sub-Program 2.2.2 Fostering Business Development.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Farm Debt Mediation Service

Description: Pursuant to the Farm Debt Mediation Act, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada delivers the Farm Debt Mediation Service which provides financial counselling and mediation services to farmers who are having difficulty meeting their financial obligations. A financial consultant conducts a financial review of the operation and prepares a recovery plan. Professional mediators help the farmer and his or her creditors to reach a mutually satisfactory financial arrangement. A stay of proceedings may be put in place to protect the farmer against recovery or seizure of assets. To be eligible, clients must be insolvent individuals, corporations, partnerships, co-operatives or other associations of persons engaged in farming for commercial purposes. This program receives funding as per the Farm Debt Mediation Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
1,847,638 1,825,137 1,805,506
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
12 12 12
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Increased agreement between insolvent farmers and their creditors on financial recovery measures Percentage of completed applications that resulted in signed arrangements between farmers and creditors 80 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

In accordance with the Farm Debt Mediation Act, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to provide its Farm Debt Mediation Service to farmers experiencing financial difficulties, and their creditors, to help arrive at mutually satisfactory arrangements. A review of the operation of the Farm Debt Mediation Service has been initiated, based on Section 28 of the Act, and the resulting report will be tabled in Parliament once it is completed. The review aims to determine if the Service is designed appropriately to maximize benefits and effectiveness of the program, identify long-term impacts of participation, and determine what, if any, changes should be made to the legislation or the Service.

As part of Bill C-18, the Agricultural Growth Act, amendments to the Farm Debt Mediation Act are proposed to allow the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to participate in mediation as a guarantor of the Advance Payments Program for better service delivery. This means, more effective negotiations for repayment arrangements, helping farmers and creditors work towards mutually satisfactory financial arrangements.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Fostering Business Development

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program builds awareness of the benefits and encourages the use of sound business management practices, while also enabling businesses in the sector to be profitable and invest where needed. It funds activities related to business management practices and skills that strengthen the capacity of businesses in the sector to: assess the financial implications of business improvements; respond to change and adapt; help agri-business owners understand their financial situation; and provide for enhanced participation by young or new entrants.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contribution payments for the AgriCompetitiveness program under Growing Forward 2, and Contributions under the Career Focus program – Youth Employment Strategy.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
4,957,882 4,957,881 4,957,882
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
13 13 13
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Individual producers and agri-business clients implement changes to their business Percentage of farmers planning to expand or diversify in the next 5 years 60 March 31, 2018
Increased supply of highly qualified people in the agriculture labour market Percentage of interns in the Career Focus Program who secure a permanent position in agriculture 75 March 31, 2018
Planning Highlights

Under Growing Forward 2, Fostering Business Development will continue to support projects that encourage the use of sound business-management practices, while also enabling businesses to be profitable and invest where needed. It funds activities related to business management and farm-safety practices, and leadership skills that strengthen the capacity of individuals and businesses to: assess the financial implications of business improvements; respond to change and adapt; help agri-business owners understand their financial situations; and provide for enhanced participation by young or new entrants. For example, Fostering Business Development has provided support to groups such as 4-H Canada and Farm Management Canada to provide farmers with educational material and opportunities to help them succeed in an increasingly competitive market.

Fostering Business Development has developed a new performance measurement strategy that encompasses a more recipient-oriented approach, as compared to the large expansive surveys that were conducted in the past. This new approach will better demonstrate the results of the activities that it supports. Contribution agreements with recipients require them to implement data collection activities and report on key performance measures. The recipients conducted initial surveys in 2014 to establish baselines for these performance measures and will conduct another survey prior to the end of their agreements to measure results.

Under the Career Focus Program, which represents a portion of the Fostering Business Development Sub-Program, agriculture-related internships will help young people gain valuable work experience. Career Focus is an Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada program stream of the Youth Employment Strategy horizontal initiative led by Employment and Social Development Canada. Eleven other federal departments also participate in the Youth Employment Strategy that includes the Skills Link and Summer Experience program streams.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Adaptability and Industry Capacity

Description: This Growing Forward 2 program provides support for provincial and territorial activities aimed at building capacity within the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector and its businesses to sustainably succeed in a market-driven and competitive world. These activities mainly focus on encouraging the use of sound business management practices and tools, while providing for enhanced participation by young or new entrants and clients in specific sub-sectors in transition; supporting the sector and its businesses to improve access to key infrastructure; and building leadership within the sector.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Adaptability and Industry Capacity under Growing Forward 2.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
45,074,739 45,074,739 45,074,739
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
4 4 4
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The sector is increasing its adoption of business management and strategic risk management practices and tools Percentage of farmers optimistic that their net farm income will remain stable or increase in the next 5 years 70 March 31, 2019
The sector is increasing production capacity Cumulative number of acres supported by infrastructure programming under Growing Forward 2 Federal/Provincial/Territorial Cost-shared programming 62,000 March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Under this Growing Forward 2 program, each province and territory has the flexibility to design and implement initiatives tailored to meet diverse regional needs. Anticipated cost-shared activities include providing advisory and assessment services on business management practices, and increasing irrigation and water infrastructure.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: Community Pastures

Description: Community Pastures enhances the sustainability of prairie rangeland for agriculture through livestock production. This work includes managing prairie rangeland to serve livestock producers and provide grazing for livestock.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
Gross Planned Spending 19,000,000 15,000,000 12,000,000
Less Respendable Revenue (19,000,000) (15,000,000) (12,000,000)
Net Planned Spending 0 0 0
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
133 90 62
There is a decrease in the Full-Time Equivalents each fiscal year as the Community Pastures Program is scheduled to sunset at the end of 2017–18.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Environmentally responsible land use and practices for the management of a multi-use, productive and bio-diverse rangeland Range health rated as "good" or "excellent" for at least 85% of Community Pastures Program lands 85 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Created in the 1930s, the Community Pastures Program is being concluded, having met its objectives to rehabilitate agricultural landscapes and help diversify rural economies in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. By the end of 2014–15, transfer of 35 of 85 pastures is expected to be completed. The transfer of the remaining pastures is on schedule. In this regard, in 2015–16, federal management of nine pastures in Manitoba and 10 pastures in Saskatchewan will revert to provincial operations. Further pasture divestitures will be made in Saskatchewan each year until 2017–18, which will be the last year in which grazing and land management services will be offered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Water Infrastructure

Description: Water Infrastructure is the management and operation of federally owned water structures in southern Saskatchewan. This program was established to ensure sound asset management of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada dams and irrigation projects while ensuring that the responsibility for public safety and water delivery obligations to irrigators, local and/or regional communities, and international obligations were met. Dams and water conveyance structures serve the agriculture and rural communities by providing irrigation, recreation, community supplies and livestock watering.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
3,216,947 3,222,321 3,230,808
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
35 35 35
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Water storage infrastructure is operationally safe and downstream risks are kept as low as reasonably practical Number of dam safety Emergency Preparedness Plans for high or very high consequence dams, which are conducted in compliance with the Canadian Dam Association's Dam Safety Guidelines, within agreed timelines 1 March 31, 2016
Water storage infrastructure is operationally safe and downstream risks are kept as low as reasonably practical Number of dam safety Emergency Response Plans for high or very high consequence dams, which are conducted in compliance with the Canadian Dam Association's Dam Safety Guidelines, within agreed timelines 1 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will prepare a dam safety Emergency Preparedness Plan and Emergency Response Plan for its Duncairn Dam in southwest Saskatchewan. These Plans will comply with Canadian Dam Association Guidelines.

The Department will also continue to ensure the safe operation, maintenance and surveillance of all its water infrastructure, while pursuing options to divest and dispose of these assets that no longer support departmental programming.

Sub-Program 2.2.6: Churchill Port Utilisation Program

Description: The Churchill Port Utilisation Program provides grant payments to legal entities, including the new voluntary Canadian Wheat Board, that arrange for the shipment of grain, outward, by ocean-going vessel, from the Port of Churchill. As the Canadian Wheat Board used the Churchill port regularly, this Program will facilitate the transition to a new marketing model as it provides the time needed to establish increased diversification in the Port of Churchill. Assistance under this federally delivered program is up to $4.6 million per year for up to 500,000 tonnes of grain. Total assistance is up to $23 million. This five-year Program ends on March 31, 2017.

This Program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Grant payments for the Churchill Port Utilisation Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
4,849,897 4,849,897 0
The Churchill Port Utilisation Program will sunset at the end of 2016–17.
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
1 1 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Grain shipments through the Port are maintained Number of tonnes of grains shipped per year from 2012 to 2017 under the Churchill Port Utilization Program 500,000 March 31, 2017
Port remains in operation Percentage of program participants intending to use the Port after the program ends 66 March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue annual client consultations to identify potential improvements to the Program aimed at helping maintain grain shipments. A total of six new shippers have used the Port since the launch of the Program.

In 2015–16, the Department will continue to apply any lessons learned from previous shipping seasons. A queue system will be applied once the Program is fully subscribed; Program administrators will monitor the system closely. Any financial assistance that becomes available as a result of a cancelled shipment will be offered to Program clients in the queue to maximize annual grain shipments through the Port.

Sub-Program 2.2.7: Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program

Description: The Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program (2014–2019) helps the agriculture, agri-food, and agri-based products sector seize opportunities, respond to new and/or emerging issues, and pathfind and/or pilot solutions to new and ongoing issues so it can adapt and remain competitive.

The Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program is a five-year program providing non-repayable contributions for industry-led projects that address national or sector-wide matters. Funding is delivered directly from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to successful applicants.

This Program uses funding from the following transfer payment(s): Contributions to support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
11,043,548 11,043,547 11,043,548
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
12 12 13
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Sector develops tools and strategies to adapt to changing circumstances and/or respond to urgent and/or critical issues Number of tools and strategies developed by the sector to adapt to changing circumstances and/or respond to urgent and/or critical issues from 2014 to 2019 40 March 31, 2019
Sector implements tools and strategies to adapt to changing circumstances and/or respond to urgent and/or critical issues Number of tools and strategies to adapt to changing circumstances and/or respond to urgent and/or critical issues implemented by the sector from 2014 to 2019 20 March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

In 2015–16, the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program will continue to support the Department's ongoing efforts to help the sector to adapt and remain competitive. Funding will be provided for national or sector-wide projects that will lead to industry-led strategies and tools to address issues and changing circumstances. Eligible applicants are not-for-profit organizations and associations, including cooperatives, marketing boards and Aboriginals.

Program 2.3: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency

Description: Section 204 of the Criminal Code of Canada designates the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food as the individual responsible for making the regulations that direct the lawful conduct of pari-mutuel betting in Canada on horse racing. The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency is a special operating agency within Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada that approves and supervises pari-mutuel betting conducted at racetracks and betting theatres across Canada, with the objective of ensuring that betting is conducted in a way that is fair to the betting public. Costs associated with the activities of the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency are recovered through a levy on every dollar bet in Canada on horse races. The levy is currently set at eight-tenths of a cent of every dollar bet. Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's strategic plans are focused on regulating and supervising pari-mutuel betting on horse races in the most modern, effective and transparent manner.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
Gross Planned Spending 9,380,000 9,380,000 9,515,000 9,652,000
Less Respendable Revenue (9,380,000) (9,380,000) (9,005,000) (8,645,000)
Net Planned Spending 0 0 510,000 1,007,000
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
35 35 35
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Pari-mutuel betting is conducted in a way that is fair to the Canadian betting public Percentage of compliance with the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations of Canadian racetracks and betting theatres inspected by Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency officers 100 March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

To help assure the Canadian betting public that pari-mutuel betting is conducted fairly, the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency will approve and inspect pari-mutuel betting activities conducted at racetracks and betting theatres across Canada. This will ensure continued compliance with the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations and policies.

In 2015–16, the Agency will continue to refine the new approach to supervising approved pari-mutuel betting. This new model will promote more efficient use of its limited resources, while enabling the Agency to deliver on its mandate to ensure the integrity of the horse racing betting system.

The Agency will maintain the uninterrupted delivery of its national equine drug control program as it begins operating under a new analytical contract, and works toward replacing the sample collection agreement which expires in the following year. This program is delivered at Canadian racetracks to help ensure the outcomes of horse races are not influenced by the inappropriate administration of drugs or medications to race horses.

The federal levy on pari-mutuel betting is expected to support a Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency operating budget of approximately $9.38 million dollars for 2015–16.

Program 3.1: Internal Services

Description: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
149,502,365 149,502,365 147,198,390 147,198,389
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
1,370 1,362 1,359
Planning Highlights
Leverage information and technology capacity to improve business practices

The Department will continue to adopt and enhance information management and information technology solutions to advance the discovery, collaboration and safeguarding of business information and knowledge within the Department and with its partners. It will also continue to support the Government of Canada's consolidation and standardization agenda with its work on web renewal, migration to a common email platform, application readiness for data-centre migration, and planning for the human- and financial-resource systems managed by the federal government.

Under the five-year Service Modernization Strategy, in 2015–16, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to streamline service delivery, expand access to online tools and further automate internal processes. The Department will also build on its current suite of Service Excellence training for its employees.

Aligning to government-wide human resources modernization priorities, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is implementing measures to improve the way it defines and delivers human resources services to clients, with emphasis on increased self-service functionality, business-process improvements, and leveraging systems and technology.

Ensure excellence through talent and performance management

Building on the implementation of the Directive on Performance Management, the Department will promote a meaningful and interactive process that supports employee development to achieve departmental organizational priorities.

Advance the Blueprint 2020 commitment

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has an ongoing commitment to the Blueprint 2020 vision of establishing new and innovative ways to improve business practices and to support a workforce with the right tools and processes to meet current and future demands. The Department's Blueprint 2020 activities will engage employees and help develop solutions in a manner that is evergreen and acknowledges the need for flexibility and adaptation. Departmental working groups have been established to help advance efforts in three core theme areas: results-oriented leadership; strong collaboration and partnerships; and open communication and better information flow.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides a general overview of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented condensed statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31
(dollars)
Financial Information 2014–15
Estimated Results
2015–16
Planned Results
Difference
Total expenses 2,135,068,000 2,389,481,000 254,413,000
Total revenues 63,979,000 62,584,000 (1,395,000)
Net cost of operations 2,071,089,000 2,326,897,000 255,808,000

The net cost of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's operations is projected to be $2.3 billion in 2015–16, an expected increase of $255.8 million compared to 2014–15 estimated results. This increase is mainly due to estimated unused authorities and other adjustments in 2014–15 for Business Risk Management programs, such as Agricultural Disaster Relief Program, AgriStability and the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act.

Total expenses are projected to be $2.4 billion in 2015–16. The majority of these expenses is in the form of transfer payments under Business Risk Management (54.8% or $1.3 billion) and is related to departmental programs discussed in Section II of this report. Other expenses include $531 million (22.2% of total expenses) in Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability and $188 million (7.9%) in Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems.

Total revenues are projected to be $119.1 million for 2015–16. The majority of these revenues is in sale of goods and services (63.4% or $75.5 million). Other revenues include $19.5 million in interest (16.4%) and $15.7 million for crop re-insurance premiums (13.2%). These revenues are presented net of revenues earned on behalf of government ($56.5 million) in the departmental consolidated future-oriented statement of operations.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Department's website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Public Information Requests Services
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5

Telephone: 613-773-1000
Toll-free: 1-855-773-0241
Fax: 613-773-2772
Telecommunications Device for the Deaf/Teletype: 613-773-2600
Email: aafc.info.aac@canada.ca
Website: www.agr.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation:
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures:
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report:
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent:
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes:
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure:
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures:
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance:
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator:
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting:
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending:
For Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports.
plans:
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities:
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program:
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture:
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities:
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
results:
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
Strategic Outcome:
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program:
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target:
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
whole-of-government framework:
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

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