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C. A Fascinating Fauna (Continued)

Cicada species occurring in more than one region of the world are marked with an asterisk (*).

10H-4. Whip cicadas with short front wings

There are two groups of species in the broad-winged members of Okanagana:

  1. the common species have the pointed meron as long as the operculum and the lobes of the theca are very broad;
  2. other, rarer species have the pointed meron shorter than the operculum and the lobes of the theca are small and rounded.

Okanagana occidentalis (Walker), * Rocky Mountain Cicada

Okanagana occidentalis

Adults: Head 6-7 mm wide; overall length (wings folded) 2.9-3.4 cm. Markings on upper side and wings yellow to pale orange; underside and legs usually redbrown; meron as long as the operculum, theca ending in broad, large lobes projecting past vesica.

Song: A number of clicks close together, continuing for a long while.

Range: Mountains of Oregon and Utah north to Canada; common in coastal areas and valleys of southern British Columbia; also found at low elevations in the Caribou and Peace River districts, and east from the Alberta foothills to southern Saskatchewan. One record of this species from Manitoba has not been confirmed. Records of this species from the Sierra Nevadas of California refer to a species much more hairy than usual, possibly a local variant Footnote 1 of "O. rimrosa" from the same area (which is not Say's O. rimosa). Okanagana bella, O. annulata, O. fratercula and O. luteobasalis (below) may be geographic variants of this common and widespread species.

Okanagana bella Davis

Okanagana bella

Adults: Similar to O. occidentalis, but have brighter, redder markings strongly contrasting with the black body; it may be a climate-induced variety ("ecophenotype").

Song: Similar to that of O. occidentalis.

Range: Common and widespread in California and Arizona, north in semiarid areas to southern British Columbia (vicinities of Kamloops and Victoria) and southern Alberta (foothills of the Rockies). A record of this species from North Dakota probably refers to the similarly-colored O. canadensis, which differs from this species in its narrower wings.

Host: Associated with douglas-fir.

Okanagana annulata Davis

Adults: Similar to O. bella, but have prominent angles on the thorax just behind the eyes, and the abdomen is hump-backed, both as in O. lurida. It may prove to be a hybrid between these two species.

Song: Unknown.

Range: California north to Idaho.

Host: Unknown.

Okanagana fratercula Davis

Adults: Similar to O. occidentalis, but it is smaller, the head 5.5 mm wide, overall length (wings folded) 2.6-2.8 cm long, and the underside and legs are almost entirely black.

Range: Nevada north to Idaho, east to Wyoming; found in Canada only in southern Alberta.

Host: Associated with sagebrush.

Okanagana luteobasalis Davis

Okanagana luteobasalis

Adults: Probably of hybrid origin, representing canadensis × occidentalis, with the body and legs black with contrasting yellow edges and spots between wing bases, meron as long as the operculum, theca ending in broad, large lobes projecting past vesica but combined with shortened wings, as in the latter.

Range: Semiarid areas of Oregon and Utah north to Idaho and southern Alberta. A record of this species from North Dakota probably refers to the similarly-colored O. canadensis, which differs from this species in its narrower wings.

Host: Associated with sagebrush.

Okanagana utahensis Davis, Sagebrush Cicada

Okanagana utahensis

Adults: Head 7.5-8 mm wide; overall length (wings folded) 3-3.5 cm. Colour pattern as in O. occidentalis, but with pale stripe on midline behind head; underside with black bars across basal segments of abdomen; meron shorter than operculum and lobes of theca small and rounded.

Song: Unknown.

 Range: Arid regions of California and Arizona north to the Columbia basin of Washington state, and likely to occur in dry intermontane valleys of southern British Columbia.

Host: Associated with sagebrush.

Okanagana vanduzeei Distant, (=O. californica Distant)

Okanagana vanduzeei

Adults: Head 6.5-7 mm wide; overall length (wings folded) 2.8-3 cm. Conspicuously hairy, especially on head and underside, tending to make it look greyish; meron shorter than opercula, pointed; theca ends in pointed processes.

Song: A record of "Okanagana occidentalis" making long (duration Footnote 2 ), sustained shrills in western Colorado appears to refer to O. vanduzeei.

Range: Common throughout California, north to Washington and Idaho; rare and local in the southern part of British Columbia, mostly in the southern Okanagan and Kootenay Valleys, but a single female was taken at Salmon Arm in 1927.

Okanagana striatipes Haldeman

Okanagana striatipes

Adults: Head 6-7 mm wide; overall length (wings folded) 2.5-3 cm, smaller than O. lurida. Colour as in O. utahensis, but underside entirely yellow-grey, or with black bars across each segment along the midline; meron shorter than operculum and lobes of theca small and rounded.

Song: Of medium pitch and average duration Footnote 3.

Range: Coast of southern California, and arid areas of Arizona north to southeastern Washington state.

Host: Associated with sagebrush.

Okanagana noveboracensis Emmons

Okanagana noveboracensis

Adults: Head 6 mm wide; overall length (wings folded) 2.8 cm; vesica only a third as long as theca, as in O. synodica. Mostly black, with narrow tan lines bordering most segments, and legs stripes with pale orange; meron shorter than operculum and lobes of theca small and rounded.

Song: Unknown.

Range: This species was described in 1854 from New York state. It is known also from a single male taken at Queenston, Ontario in 1942, but has not been seen since then. Other records from Indiana, Maine, Pennsylvania and Manitoba probably refer to its longer-winged relative, O. canadensis, as O. noveboracensis seems to be limited to the area near Niagara Falls Footnote 4. Western records (Nebraska, California) refer to various other broad-winged species.

See The North America Genera and Picture Guide

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