2017 Annual Report of Agroclimate Conditions Across Canada

Alternative formats

National overview

This report provides a brief overview of agroclimate conditions across Canada during the 2017 agricultural growing season. Globally, 2017 was another hot year, the second or third hottest on record based on independent analysis by two science agenciesFootnote 1 Footnote 2. In Canada, the 2017 growing season was warm and dry in the west and cool and wet in the east (Figure 1). Agricultural regions experienced a wide range of climate and weather-related impacts including drought, wildfires, flooding, and severe storm damage.

Figure 1 - Precipitation Percentiles (April 1, 2017 to August 31, 2017)

Description of this image follows
Description of figure 1

Description: Map of Canada showing percentile rankings of precipitation from April 1, 2017 to August 31, 2017 compared to historical distribution. The categories, in order of driest to wettest, are as follows: Record Dry, Extremely Low (0-10), Very Low (10-20), Low (20-40), Mid-Range (40-60), High (60-80), Very High (80-90), Extremely High (90-100), Record Wet. The numbers are percentile categories.

Data is only displayed within Canada's agricultural extent.

Precipitation was distributed as follows:

  • Record Dry in:
    • a few tiny pockets in central British Columbia;
    • several pockets in southern Saskatchewan;
    • a few small pockets in southern Manitoba; and
    • a tiny pocket in Eastern Québec.
  • Extremely Low (<0 to 10) in:
    • a pocket in central British Columbia;
    • a few pockets in southern Alberta;
    • a large pocket covering southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba; and
    • a few small pockets in eastern Québec and Newfoundland.
  • Very Low (10 to 20) in:
    • a pocket in central British Columbia;
    • a pocket in southern Alberta;
    • a thin pocket spanning across southern Saskatchewan;
    • several small pockets in southern Manitoba; and
    • a small pocket in eastern Québec.
  • Low (20 to 40) in:
    • a few pockets across south and central British Columbia;
    • a large pocket across the southern half of Alberta;
    • a thin pocket across southern Saskatchewan;
    • a few small pockets in southern Manitoba;
    • a few small pockets in northern Ontario;
    • a large pocket in eastern Québec;
    • a large pocket covering southern New Brunswick into northern Nova Scotia;
    • a pocket over most of Prince Edward Island; and
    • a few small pockets in Newfoundland.
  • Mid-Range (40 to 60) in:
    • a few pockets over British Columbia in the north, south and on Vancouver Island;
    • a large pocket in northern Alberta and a pocket around Edmonton;
    • pockets in the Rocky Mountains in Alberta;
    • a thin pocket in central Saskatchewan;
    • a small pocket in the north and south of Ontario;
    • a pocket in central Québec;
    • a pocket covering western New Brunswick;
    • a pocket in central Nova Scotia;
    • a small pocket on Prince Edward Island; and
    • a few pockets on Newfoundland.
  • High (60 to 80) in:
    • a couple pockets in northern British Columbia and Vancouver Island;
    • a few thin pockets in northern Alberta;
    • pockets in the Rocky Mountains in Alberta;
    • a few small pockets along the central Saskatchewan-Manitoba border;
    • a few small pockets in northern and southern Ontario;
    • a pocket along the Ontario- Québec border and in central Québec; and
    • a pocket in western Nova Scotia.
  • Very High (80 to 90) in:
    • a small pocket in northern British Columbia and Vancouver Island;
    • a pocket in northern Alberta spanning into Saskatchewan;
    • a small pocket south of Medicine Hat in Alberta;
    • a pocket in southern Ontario;
    • a pocket along the Ontario- Québec border; and
    • a pocket in western Québec.
  • Extremely High (90 to 100) in:
    • a few small pockets in northern British Columbia and Vancouver Island;
    • several pockets in central northern Alberta in towards Saskatchewan;
    • a pocket covering east southern Ontario;
    • a pocket in central Québec surrounding Montreal; and
    • a pocket north of Québec City.
  • Record Wet (>100) in:
    • a few small pockets in north central Saskatchewan;
    • a pocket in southern Ontario around Georgian Bay; and
    • a large pocket in eastern Ontario towards Québec.

Produced using near real-time data that has undergone initial quality control. The map may not be accurate for all regions due to data availability and data errors.

In Western Canada, a large portion of the southern region, from the British Columbia Interior to the southeastern Prairies, experienced the driest summer in 70 yearsFootnote 3. Many areas recorded less than half of normal rainfall during the growing seasonFootnote 3. These extremely dry conditions resulted in British Columbia experiencing the worst wildfire season in provincial history with widespread damage to fencing, forage crops, and rangeland. Drought conditions, record high temperatures, and frequent strong winds across British Columbia, and most of Alberta and Saskatchewan resulted in heat stress, accelerated crop maturation, and poor grain fill, as well as reduced livestock feed and water availability. A small portion of the northern agricultural region in Alberta and Saskatchewan experienced persistent excessive moisture conditions that caused significant delays in spring seeding, crop development, and harvesting operations.

Eastern Ontario and southeastern Québec were dominated by wet conditions and cool temperatures which resulted in delayed crop development. Late in the growing season, dry conditions emerged in parts of eastern Québec and Atlantic Canada, which impacted crop yield and quality.

Going into winter, soil moisture reserves improved in British Columbia, but remained low across the southern Prairies and parts of Atlantic Canada. Soil moisture was reported as adequate to surplus across much of southern Ontario and Québec. Overall, agricultural production fared better than initially expected given the extent and severity of drought across Western Canada and persistent excess moisture concerns across Eastern Canada. Production for all principal field crops increased by more than 7,600 kilotons compared to last yearFootnote 4. Antecedent moisture conditions, just enough rain and sun at the right times, and local variability helped realize production despite the adverse conditions.

Pacific Region (British Columbia)

Figure 2 - Canadian Drought Monitor (Conditions as of September 30, 2017)

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Description of figure 2

Description: Map of Western Canada showing drought conditions at the end of September, 2017. Drought levels, in increasing order of severity, are as follows: Abnormally Dry, Moderate Drought, Severe Drought, Extreme Drought, and Exceptional Drought. The more severe types of drought are always surrounded by less severe types of drought (for example, wherever there is Moderate Drought, it is surrounded by Abnormally Dry conditions).

  • British Columbia:
    • Abnormally Dry conditions in:
      • a thin pocket extending from the Pacific ocean to Williston Lake encompassing Hyland Post and Ingenika Mine;
      • a pocket north and east of Fort Nelson, along the northeast border of Alberta and south border of North West Territories;
      • A small pocket surrounding Fort St. John along the central border with Alberta;
      • a thin pocket stretching from Bella Bella to Prince George; and
      • an area covering north of Vancouver Island.
    • Moderate Drought in:
      • a large pocket in the southern half of the province stretching from the Pacific Coast to the Alberta border encompassing Kelowna, Vancouver, Bella Coola, and Valemount; and
      • an area covering south of Vancouver Island.
    • Severe Drought in:
      • a pocket encompassing Quesnel, Little Fort and Princeton; and
      • a pocket in the southeast extending from the United States border to the Alberta border, including Grand Folks and Revelstoke.
    • Extreme Drought in:
      • a pocket encompassing Kamloops, Merritt, Ashcroft and Gang Ranch; and
      • a small pocket surrounding Salmon Arm.
  • Alberta:
    • Abnormally Dry conditions in:
      • a thin pocket running from the south central British Columbia border to the south central Saskatchewan border encompassing Jasper, Edmonton and Provost;
      • a large area encompassing Grande Prairie, Peerless Lake and Rainbow Lake, excluding a pocket surrounding Bison Lake; and
      • a tiny pocket northeast of Hay Camp.
    • Moderate Drought in:
      • A thin pocket stretching from Saskatchewan River Crossing to Sounding Lake, including a pocket encompassing Innisfail and Drumheller;
      • An area spanning Manning to Fort Vermilion; and
      • a small pocket surrounding Medicine Hat.
    • Severe Drought in:
      • a large pocket running from the southwestern British Columbia border to the southeastern Saskatchewan border; and
      • a small pocket between Bison Lake and Wadlin Lake.
    • Extreme Drought in:
      • a small pocket surrounding Bragg Creek;
      • a small pocket south of Bearberry; and
      • a pocket extending from southwestern Saskatchewan to surround Lethbridge.
  • Saskatchewan:
    • Abnormally Dry conditions in:
      • a tiny pocket north of Lake Athabasca;
      • a pocket north and west of Reindeer Lake, including Wollaston Lake; and
      • a large pocket encompassing the southern half of the province extending as far north as Flin Flon and Prince Albert.
    • Moderate Drought in:
      • a thin pocket in the south encompassing Kindersley, Humboldt and Yorkton, extending as far south as the United States border; and
      • a small pocket along the southwestern Alberta Border near Golden Prairie.
    • Severe Drought in:
      • a thin pocket in the south encompassing Leader, Watrous, and Estevan.
    • Extreme Drought in:
      • a large pocket encompassing Swift Current, Regina, and Assiniboia.
    • Exceptional Drought in:
      • a small area along the Unites States border including Coronach.
  • Manitoba:
    • Abnormally Dry conditions in:
      • a large pocket in the southern half of the province;
      • a pocket north and east of Reindeer Lake, encompassing Lac Brochet; and
      • a pocket in the east encompassing Shamattawa, Oxford House, and Garden Hill.
    • Moderate Drought in:
      • a small pocket along the southeastern Saskatchewan border, including Swan River and Melita;
      • a small pocket extending from the United States Border surrounding Carman, Altona, and Emerson; and
      • a small pocket in the east along the Ontario border, surrounding Red Sucker Lake.

Above average spring precipitation and good winter snow pack in British Columbia resulted in excess moisture conditions for much of the province. Wet conditions delayed seeding, and put many of the crops two weeks behind schedule. In the Peace region, approximately 20 per cent of the annual crop acreage was left unseeded this year due to excess moisture. In south and central parts of the province, the wet spring was followed by one of the driest summers on record, with little or no precipitation from June through to September, and significant drought conditions developed (Figure 2). The central Okanagan experienced its warmest and driest July since 1969Footnote 5. The first cut of dryland forage crops was good; however, the second cut did not occur in the southern interior due to drought. Strong spring growth and hot dry conditions, coupled with high winds contributed to persistent wildfires across the province resulting in the worst year on record for wildfiresFootnote 3. More than 1,300 wildfires burned approximately 1.2 million hectares of land across south and central regions between April and November. Damage in the province was estimated to be more than $127 millionFootnote 6. Agricultural impacts included the loss of rangeland, forage, fencing and livestock infrastructure, as well as cattle mortalities.

The provincial government is providing $2.2 million over three years to help producers replace damaged fencing on crown landFootnote 7. The British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture reported that approximately 2,800 head of cattle were relocated with government assistance, and an unknown number of cattle were moved by private and non-government organizations. The 2017 Canada-British Columbia Wildfires Recovery Initiative, valued at up to $20 million, to assist producers with the costs incurred by the wildfire damage was announced September 5, 2017Footnote 8. This provided feed to roughly 18,000 head of cattle. Concerns over long term forage supplies exist, as the health and productivity of fire impacted rangeland is expected to be reduced next year. Much of southern British Columbia, including Vancouver Island, suffered from reduced feed supplies due to drought and pest issues. Increased precipitation levels in early August provided some relief to drought affected areas, although soil moisture deficits persisted in central British Columbia. Overall, provincial crop yields were below average due to late seeding and drought conditions throughout the summer.

Prairie Region (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba)

Figure 3 - Precipitation Percentiles - Prairie Region (April 1, 2017 to October 31, 2017)

Description of this image follows
Description of figure 3

Description: Map of the Prairie Region of Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) showing percentile rankings of precipitation from April 1, 2017 to October 31, 2017 compared to historical distribution. The categories, in order of driest to wettest, are as follows: Record Dry, Extremely Low (0-10), Very Low (10-20), Low (20-40), Mid-Range (40-60), High (60-80), Very High (80-90), Extremely High (90-100), Record Wet. The numbers are percentile categories.

Data is only displayed within Canada's agricultural extent.

Precipitation was distributed as follows:

  • Record Dry in:
    • a few tiny pockets in southern Alberta;
    • several pockets in southern Saskatchewan; and
    • a pocket surrounding Swan River in Manitoba.
  • Extremely Low (<0 to 10) in:
    • a few large pockets in southern Alberta;
    • a large pocket encompassing the southern half of Saskatchewan, including Regina; and
    • several small pockets in southern Manitoba, including south Winnipeg.
  • Very Low (10 to 20) in:
    • a few small pockets in northern Alberta around High Level;
    • a large pocket in southern Alberta;
    • a large pocket spanning across southern Saskatchewan; and
    • a large pocket covering southern Manitoba.
  • Low (20 to 40) in:
    • a few small pockets in northern Alberta near High Level;
    • a thin pocket surrounding southern Alberta;
    • a thin pocket across central south Saskatchewan including Saskatoon; and
    • several small pockets across southern Manitoba.
  • Mid-Range (40 to 60) in:
    • a few pockets in northern Alberta nearby Grimshaw;
    • a thin pocket spanning central Alberta south of Edmonton;
    • a pocket surrounding the Rocky Mountains and pocket below Medicine Hat in Alberta;
    • a thin pocket spanning central Saskatchewan north of Prince Albert; and
    • a small pocket in southeastern Manitoba.
  • High (60 to 80) in:
    • a pocket above Grande Prairie in northern Alberta;
    • a thin pocket in Alberta surrounding Edmonton towards the Saskatchewan border;
    • several pockets along the Rocky Mountains and south of Medicine Hat in Alberta;
    • a thin pocket in central Saskatchewan;
    • a pocket along the central Saskatchewan-Manitoba border; and
    • a small pocket in southeastern Manitoba.
  • Very High (80 to 90) in:
    • a thing pocket encompassing Edmonton towards Grande Prairie in Alberta;
    • a few tiny pockets along the Rocky Mountains in Alberta and south of Medicine Hat in Alberta;
    • a large pocket along the central Alberta-Saskatchewan border; and
    • a couple small pockets along the central Saskatchewan-Manitoba border.
  • Extremely High (90 to 100) in:
    • a large pocket northwest of Edmonton towards Grande Prairie in Alberta;
    • a few tiny pockets along the Rocky Mountains in Alberta;
    • a pocket in central west Saskatchewan surrounding Meadow Lake; and
    • a few tiny pockets along the central Saskatchewan-Manitoba border.
  • Record Wet in:
    • several pockets north of Edmonton in Alberta;
    • a small pocket in in central west Saskatchewan near Meadow Lake; and
    • a tiny pocket in along the central Saskatchewan-Manitoba border at Flin Flon.

Produced using near real-time data that has undergone initial quality control. The map may not be accurate for all regions due to data availability and data errors.

The growing season started with well below normal precipitation for much of the southern Prairies. In northern agricultural regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan, wet spring conditions resulted in further delays to harvesting the 2016 crops. This situation, coupled with two large snowfalls in April, caused significant delays in spring seeding and crop development in these regions. Northern Manitoba also experienced excessive moisture and spring flooding, although the impacts to agriculture and seeding operations were less severe than in northern Alberta and Saskatchewan. In southern parts of the Prairies, spring seeding was completed ahead of the five-year average due to the early arrival of spring that brought warm and dry conditions. These conditions were so intense that in some areas, uneven germination occurred despite good soil moisture reserves.

Drought dominated the southern Prairies throughout the summer. Beginning in June, drought conditions developed rapidly as a result of strong winds, hot temperatures and little to no rain in many areas (Figure 3). Many locations in southern Saskatchewan reported the driest, or second driest, year on record. Prairie livestock production was negatively impacted by water scarcity and salinization, feed shortages and heat stress. Drought impacts on crop production included heat stress, shorter crop canopy height and poor grain fill. Canola crops suffered reduced yields from excessive heat, and first-cut forage yields were reduced. Drought impacts were moderated by soil moisture reserves from previous years. Across the southern Prairies, the harvest was completed well ahead of the five-year average.

Northern Alberta and Saskatchewan experienced excess moisture conditions, which delayed harvest operations and left roughly two per cent of field crops unharvested over the winter around Edmonton, Alberta. For the second consecutive year, excess moisture conditions resulted in crops remaining unharvested in this region. In southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, drought resulted in below average yields. Quality remained high, however, because of limited disease incidence. Manitoba agricultural production reported average to above average yields, despite drought concerns.

Dry conditions continued into the fall season and high winds fanned local wildfires across southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. In southern Saskatchewan, wildfires burned more than 36,000 hectaresFootnote 9 and caused agricultural infrastructure, crop and livestock losses valued at approximately $1 millionFootnote 10. Fall precipitation events improved surface soil moisture conditions across the southern Prairies, but were not sufficient to recharge subsurface soil moisture prior to the winter freeze. There are ongoing concerns with livestock feed supplies and soil moisture levels, both excess and deficit. Fall soil moisture deficits reduced seeded acreage for winter cereal crops.

Central Region (Ontario, Quebec)

Figure 4 - Precipitation Percentiles - Central Region (April 1, 2017 to October 31, 2017)

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Description of figure 4

Description: Map of the Central Region of Canada (Ontario, Québec) showing percentile rankings of precipitation from April 1, 2017 to October 31, 2017 compared to historical distribution. The categories, in order of driest to wettest, are as follows: Record Dry, Extremely Low (0-10), Very Low (10-20), Low (20-40), Mid-Range (40-60), High (60-80), Very High (80-90), Extremely High (90-100), Record Wet. The numbers are percentile categories.

Data is only displayed within Canada's agricultural extent.

Precipitation was distributed as follows:

  • Extremely Low (<0 to 10) in:
    • a few pockets in eastern Québec.
  • Very Low (10 to 20) in:
    • a small pocket in northern Québec; and
    • a few pockets in eastern Québec.
  • Low (20 to 40) in:
    • a few small pockets in southwestern Ontario and a pocket nearby Elliot Lake;
    • a pocket in northern Québec; and
    • several pockets in eastern Québec along the St. Lawrence.
  • Mid-Range (40 to 60) in:
    • A pocket covering southwestern Ontario and a pocket surrounding Elliot Lake;
    • a pocket along the central Ontario-Québec border;
    • a pocket east of Montreal, Québec; and
    • a several small pockets in eastern Québec along the St. Lawrence.
  • High (60 to 80) in:
    • Several pockets in southern Ontario;
    • a few pockets along the central Ontario-Québec border; and
    • a large pocket spanning Montreal to Québec City in Québec.
  • Very High (80 to 90) in:
    • a large pocket in southern Ontario, surrounding the Greater Toronto Area stretching up to Barrie, North Bay and Sault Ste. Marie;
    • a pocket along the central northern Ontario-Québec border; and
    • a pocket northeast of Montreal in Québec and a pocket north of Québec City.
  • Extremely High (90 to 100) in:
    • A few pockets in Ontario along Georgian Bay;
    • A pocket south of Hamilton in southern Ontario;
    • A pocket between Peterborough and Mattawa in Ontario;
    • A few pockets surround Montreal in Québec; and
    • A few tiny pockets around Québec City and a pocket encompassing Lac Saint-Jean.
  • Record Wet in:
    • A pocket south of Collingwood in southern Ontario;
    • A small pocket northwest of Georgian Bay;
    • A large pocket spanning from Peterborough to Ottawa in Ontario, towards the Outatouis region in Québec; and
    • A few tiny pockets surrounding Montreal.

Produced using near real-time data that has undergone initial quality control. The map may not be accurate for all regions due to data availability and data errors.

Above normal spring precipitation across Ontario and Québec resulted in a large number of significant flood events and excess soil moisture conditions. Cool temperatures and above normal precipitation (Figure 4) contributed to the delay of seeding and persistent delays in crop development across Central Canada, particularly in eastern Ontario and western Québec, where 10 to 15 per cent of fields were flooded during seeding. Summer storms brought intense precipitation and hail damaged 8,000 hectares of cropland in eastern Québec and areas north of TorontoFootnote 11. The 2017 Canada-Quebec Hail Assistance Initiative, valued at up to $13 million, provided assistance to farmers who incurred extraordinary expenses as a result of hail damageFootnote 11. Warm and dry fall weather arrived in time for harvesting in Ontario and eastern Québec. Drought conditions emerged in late summer in eastern Québec, which delayed crop development and ultimately resulted in reduced yields and livestock feed shortages. Overall, yields were near average in Ontario and Québec as favorable conditions in parts of the region resulted in higher than normal yields, compensating for yield shortfalls caused by excess moisture and drought in other areas.

Atlantic Region (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador)

Figure 5 - Precipitation Percentiles - Atlantic Region (April 1, 2017 to October 31, 2017)

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Description of figure 5

Description: Map of the Atlantic Region of Canada (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador) showing percentile rankings of precipitation from April 1, 2017 to October 31, 2017 compared to historical distribution. The categories, in order of driest to wettest, are as follows: Record Dry, Extremely Low (0-10), Very Low (10-20), Low (20-40), Mid-Range (40-60), High (60-80), Very High (80-90), Extremely High (90-100), Record Wet. The numbers are percentile categories.

Data is only displayed within Canada's agricultural extent.

Precipitation was distributed as follows:

  • Record Dry in:
    • tiny pockets around Six Mile Road and Chéticamp in Nova Scotia; and
    • small pocket in Cape Ray and north of Marystown in Newfoundland.
  • Extremely Low (<0 to 10) in:
    • a pocket on northern Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia;
    • a couple small pockets along the Northumberland Strait in Nova Scotia;
    • a couple pockets on Prince Edward Island; and
    • a few pockets in south Newfoundland.
  • Very Low (10 to 20) in:
    • a pocket in northern New Brunswick surrounding Campbellton;
    • a pocket in southern New Brunswick surrounding Sussex;
    • a few pockets along the Northumberland Strait in Nova Scotia;
    • a small pocket on northern Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia;
    • a pocket spanning Prince Edward Island; and
    • a few pockets across Newfoundland, particularly in the east.
  • Low (20 to 40) in:
    • a few pockets along the coast in northern New Brunswick;
    • a large pocket covering southern New Brunswick including Moncton;
    • a large pocket spanning the Northumberland strait into the Annapolis Valley in Nova Scotia, spanning eastward towards Cape Breton Island;
    • two pockets in northern Prince Edward Island and surrounding Charlottetown; and
    • several pockets across Newfoundland, including around St. John’s.
  • Mid-Range (40 to 60) in:
    • a large pocket in western New Brunswick;
    • a few small pockets in eastern New Brunswick;
    • a large pocket in southeast Nova Scotia;
    • a small pocket on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia; and
    • a few pockets scattered across Newfoundland.
  • High (60 to 80) in:
    • a few pockets in western New Brunswick;
    • a pocket east of Halifax in Nova Scotia; and
    • a small pocket on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia.
  • Very High (80 to 90) in:
    • two tiny pockets in western New Brunswick; and
    • a tiny pocket east of Halifax in Nova Scotia.

Extremely High (90 to 100) and Record Wet did not occur in any areas of the Atlantic Region during this time period. Produced using near real-time data that has undergone initial quality control. The map may not be accurate for all regions due to data availability and data errors.

Atlantic Canada began the growing season with above normal precipitation. This more than replenished the moisture deficits from last season, and contributed to spring flooding and excess moisture conditions. May 2017 was the wettest May in five years, and seeding was delayed by an average of two weeks across the region. Dry conditions set in over the summer in parts of Atlantic Canada, with the driest areas in New Brunswick (Figure 5). The impacts of the dry conditions were minimized due to reserve soil moisture levels from the wet spring. Impacts to yields were variable throughout the Atlantic Provinces. Persistent abnormally dry conditions in New Brunswick resulted in stunted growth and reduced yields for corn, soybean, potatoes and other crops. Low water table levels remain a concern across parts of Atlantic Canada going into winter.

Winter Outlook (as Decembre 31, 2017)

Through the first half of the 2017-18 winter season temperatures were above normal for Western Canada and below normal in Eastern Canada. Since November 1, 2017, precipitation was variable across British Columbia, with above normal precipitation in the south and below normal levels in the central region. The Prairie region continued to receive well below normal precipitation. Eastern Canada generally received near normal precipitation, but dry pockets still persist. La Niña conditions emerged at the beginning of the winter season; conditions are expected to weaken and return to neutral conditions by the start of spring. For more information on the El Niño phenomenon, see Environment and Climate Change Canada’s webpage.

January temperatures are expected to remain above normal for much of Western Canada and near to below normal for Eastern Canada. Seasonal forecasts for January to March show near normal temperatures for coastal British Columbia, and below normal temperatures for southeastern British Columbia, southern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan. Above normal temperatures are expected in the Great Lakes region and in Atlantic Canada. The seasonal precipitation forecasts suggest above normal precipitation will be received in southeastern British Columbia, southern Alberta, southern Ontario and Atlantic Canada. For more information on the forecasts and confidence levels, see Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Seasonal Forecast webpage.

2017 National Dashboard of Agroclimate Risks

Description of this image follows

The colours represent a scale from 'no significant risk' to 'large or urgent risk' with green being the least risk followed by yellow, then orange, and with red being the largest or most urgent risk.

Description of the dashboard
Summary of 2017 agroclimate conditions
Date British Columbia Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Ontario Quebec Atlantic
April 11 1
abnormally cold, excess moisture
2
untimely precipitation
2
excess moisture, flooding
2
excess moisture, flooding
1
cool temperatures
No report 1
April 25 1
abnormally cold, excess moisture
4
abnormally cold, untimely precipitation, excess moisture
2
abnormally cold, excess moisture
2
excess moisture, flooding
2
excess moisture
2
flooding, excess moisture
1
May 9 1
excess moisture, flooding
4
abnormally cold, excess moisture
2
abnormally cold
2
excess moisture
2
abnormally cold, excess moisture, flooding
3
excess moisture, abnormally cold, flooding
2
excess moisture, flooding
May 24 2
excess moisture, flooding
3
excess moisture
2
excess moisture, abnormally cold
1 3
excess moisture, abnormally cold
2
excess moisture, damaging winds, flooding
2
excess moisture
June 6 3
excess moisture, untimely precipitation
2
excess moisture
2
too much / little precipitation, thunderstorms
1
not enough precipitation
2
excess moisture, abnormally cold, high humidity
2
excess moisture
2
excess moisture
June 20 3
excess moisture
2
excess moisture
2
too much / little precipitation
1 2
excess moisture
1 1
July 5 2
Too much / little precipitation
2
excess moisture
3
drought
1
not enough precipitation
2
excess moisture, abnormally cold
1
hail
1
July 18 4
wildfire, abnormally warm and dry
2
too much / little precipitation
3
drought, heat stress
1
dry, heat stress
3
excess moisture, abnormally cold
1 1
dry
August 1 4
wildfire, abnormally warm and dry
2
too much / little precipitation, abnormally warm
3
drought, heat stress
2
dry
2
excess moisture, abnormally cold
2
too much / little precipitation, abnormally cold
2
dry
August 15 4
wildfire, drought
2
too much / little precipitation, abnormally warm
3
drought, flooding
2
dry
2
excess moisture
2
too much / little preciptiation
2
dry
August 29 4
wildfire, drought
2
drought, thunderstorm
3
drought, excess moisture
2
dry
2
abnormally cold, thunderstorms
2
too much / little preciptiation
1
September 12 4
wildfire, drought
2
too much / little precipitation, drought
3
drought
2
dry
2
excess moisture, abnormally cold
2
excess moisture, abnormally cold
1
September 26 3
wildfire, drought
3
too much / little precipitation, drought
3
drought
1 2
excess moisture
2
abnormally warm, drought
1
October 11 2
drought
3
too much / little precipitation, drought
3
drought
1 2
excess moisture
2
excess moisture, drought
1
dry
November 7 2
drought
3
drought, wildfire damaging winds, excess moisture
3
drought, damaging winds, wildfire
1 2 2 1
dry

The numbers in each cell (1, 2, 3, 4) are a scale with (1) representing ‘no significant risk’ to (4) representing a ‘large or urgent risk.

On a regular basis throughout the growing season, AAFC monitors and reports on a suite of agroclimate risks to agricultural production. This dashboard is a high-level summary of risks by region across the country, by reporting period. The colours represent the level of overall risk, and the key words highlight the most-significant risks.


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