A Snapshot of the Canadian Apple Industry, 2010

Alternative Formats

Prepared by:
Market Analysis and Information Section
Horticulture and Special Crops Division
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada


Introduction

Canada has a long and proud history of growing apples. First brought over by European settlers in the 17th century, apples were a pillar of the developing national economy and can be credited with sparking early investment in the young nation. In 2010, the farm gate valueFootnote [1] of the Canadian apple crop was estimated at $148.5 million, while total acreage used for apple production represented about 16%Footnote [2] of all acreage planted with fruits in Canada. Canadian apple production has been decreasing since 1999. This brochure will highlight the current state of the apple industry in Canada.

Planted Acreage and Number of Farms

According to Statistics Canada data, the total planted acreageFootnote [3] for apples has been steadily decreasing over the last decade, as illustrated in Table 1, and was estimated at 18,110 hectares in 2010. This downward trend is due primarily to a switch to other tree fruits as well as to the adoption of high density apple plantings requiring less acreage, as old apple varieties are replaced with newer varieties that are more in demand by consumers.

Table 1 - Planted Acreage for Apples by Province (Hectares)
2001200220032004200520062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (22-003-X - Fruit and Vegetable Production)
Nova Scotia 2,630 2,550 2,550 2,469 2,388 2,428 2,469 2,428 2,226 1,851
New Brunswick 416 413 445 405 364 324 304 283 255 227
Quebec 6,843 6,677 6,677 6,637 6,515 6,475 6,414 6,280 6,024 5,989
Ontario 9,814 8,903 8,903 7,608 7,568 8,094 7,689 7,284 7,541 6,394
British Columbia 5,982 5,868 5,868 5,666 4,654 4,371 4,654 3,845 3,794 3,550
Canada 25,799 24,522 24,552 22,889 21,586 21,813 21,645 20,205 19,929 18,110

Over the last ten years, the total planted acreage for apples in Canada has decreased by 7,689 hectares, or 30%. Ontario and British Columbia, which have lost 3,420 and 2,432 hectares respectively since 2001, accounted for the majority of this reduction.

There are five provinces that account for the bulk of apple production in Canada. Due to having unique microclimates, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia all have suitable environments for growing apples.

In 2010, Ontario had the largest land area set aside for growing apples, making up 36% of the national total, followed by Quebec with 33% and British Columbia with 20% of the area used for growing apples (Figure 1).

Description of this image follows.
Provincial Shares of Total Planted Acreage for Apples, 2010 - Figure 1

Figure 1 shows a pie chart displaying a percentage for each province from Table 1. The largest segment is Ontario with 36%, followed by Quebec at 33%, British Columbia with 20%, Nova Scotia with 10%, and lastly New Brunswick with 1%.


Table 2 – Number of Apple FarmsFootnote [4] in Canada
20012006% Change
Note: The 2011 Census of Agriculture data were not available at the time of the publication of this report. Source: Statistics Canada (95-629-XWE, Census of Agriculture, 2006)
Nova Scotia 272 228 (16)
New Brunswick 72 61 (15)
Quebec 803 741 (8)
Ontario 1,419 1,223 (14)
British Columbia 1,986 1,771 (11)
Other Provinces 138 166 20
Canada 4,690 4,190 (11)

New Brunswick, as one of the first settled regions in Canada, has a rich history of growing apples. The varieties grown include the iconic Canadian McIntosh, which the Apple Growers of New Brunswick (Producteurs de pommes du Nouveau-Brunswick) record as being grown there since the 1930s. The popular Honeycrisp apple is a relatively new variety for the province.

Nova Scotia shares a common history of production with its neighbor New Brunswick, and the organization Nova Scotia Apples, a division within the Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association, claims over 40 ;varieties of apples are grown in the province. The main varieties are the common McIntosh, Red Delicious, Idared, Spartan and Cortland. Nova Scotia now also grows Gala, Jonagold and Honeycrisp, relatively new varieties for the region.

Quebec also has a long history of growing apples which can be traced back to the colonization period. Its producers' association, the Fédération des producteurs de pommes du Québec, names the McIntosh, first grown in the province in 1836, its most popular variety. The other major varieties grown in Quebec are Cortland, Spartan and Empire.

The Ontario Apple Growers lists 16 varieties grown on a commercial scale in the province, including McIntosh, Empire, Spy, Red Delicious, Idared and Spartan. It also grows the relatively new Fuji, Honeycrisp and Ambrosia varieties.

British Columbia, with its warmer winters and moderate summers, is an ideal province for growing apples. The province dedicates about 61% of its orchard land to apples. Newer varieties like Fuji, Ambrosia and Gala are increasingly popular, grown alongside traditional varieties like Red Delicious, Spartan, McIntosh and Golden Delicious. British Columbia is home to 43% of all farms growing apples in Canada, as shown in Figure 2.

Description of this image follows.
Number of Apple Farms by Province – Percent Share, 2006 - Figure 2

Figure 2 shows a pie chart displaying the percentage for each province of Apple farms from Table 2. The largest segment is British Columbia with 43%, followed by Ontario with 29%, Quebec at 18%, Nova Scotia with 5%, other provinces with 4%, and lastly, New Brunswick with 1%.

Production

In 2010, the total marketed productionFootnote [5] of apples in Canada was 336,834 metric tonnes (mt), the lowest in a 10-year period. Table 3 displays the total marketed apple production data since 2001. The volume of the 2010 apple crop was 23% lower than 2009.

Table 3 – Marketed Production of Apples by Province in Metric Tonnes ('000)
2001200220032004200520062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (22-003-X - Fruit and Vegetable Production)
Nova Scotia 35.4 40.8 36.3 31.0 39.4 39.0 41.1 38.8 40.4 33.7
New Brunswick 3.8 4.7 4.6 5.0 4.6 4.1 3.6 3.9 4.0 3.7
Quebec 71.5 87.2 66.8 78.9 78.2 87.7 140.6 108.0 119.5 90.2
Ontario 241.5 115.7 145.2 142.4 168.7 154.7 183.7 169.4 178.0 126.6
British Columbia 114.0 133.1 126.1 122.8 117.4 90.7 77.1 106.4 93.3 82.3
Canada 466.6 381.9 379.2 380.6 408.6 376.5 446.4 426.9 435.5 336.8

Ontario is the largest apple producing province in the country, with a total marketed production of 126,623 mt of apples in 2010, followed by Quebec and British Columbia in order of importance. Ontario has seen its share of the total Canadian marketed production decrease from about 52% in 2001 to 38% in 2010, while Quebec has seen its share jump from 15% to 27% in the same period and British Columbia’s share has remained almost unchanged at 24% of the total marketed production. In the last ten years, marketed production has declined in both Ontario and British Columbia, while it has significantly increased in Quebec, making it the second largest apple producing province behind Ontario. Production in the Maritimes has remained relatively stable.

Figure 3 illustrates the provincial shares of total Canadian marketed production for the five main producing provinces: Ontario (38%), Quebec (27%), British Columbia (24%), Nova Scotia (10%) and New Brunswick (1%).

Description of this image follows.
Marketed Production of Apples by Province – Volume Percent Share, 2010 - Figure 3

Figure 3 shows a pie chart displaying a percentage for provincial shares of total Canadian marketed production from Table 3. The largest segment is Ontario with 38%, followed by Quebec at 27%, British Columbia with 24%, Nova Scotia with 10%, and New Brunswick with 10%.

Coinciding with the drop in production was a decrease in total Farm Gate Value (FGV). In 2010, the total FGV for Canadian apples was estimated at $148.5 million, 18% lower than the previous year. Table 4 shows the provincial and national data for FGV over the past ten years, and Figure 4 illustrates the provincial shares of the total FGV for apples in 2010.

Table 4 – Farm Gate Value ($ Million) of Apples by Province
2001200220032004200520062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (22-003-X - Fruit and Vegetable Production)
Nova Scotia 8.0 12.0 9.0 8.8 9.9 10.5 11.8 12.3 14.5 12.2
New Brunswick 2.2 3.1 1.8 2.5 5.5 1.5 1.7 2.0 2.0 1.6
Quebec 23.4 36.0 25.9 28.2 29.2 34.7 46.8 46.5 43.0 35.7
Ontario 97.4 56.2 55.0 48.9 60.5 62.2 75.0 75.4 85.6 61.0
British Columbia 34.9 49.4 61.0 34.6 36.7 38.5 44.8 35.2 36.5 37.7
Canada 166.3 157.1 153.0 123.2 138.7 147.6 180.4 171.7 181.9 148.5

Description of this image follows.
Farm Gate Value of Apples by Province – Percent Share, 2010 - Figure 4

Figure 4 shows a pie chart displaying the percentage for farm gate value of apples for each province from Table 4. The largest segment is Ontario with 41%, followed by British Columbia with 26%, Quebec with 24%, Nova Scotia at 8%, and New Brunswick with 1%.

Canadian Imports and Exports

Imports

Canada runs a trade deficit when it comes to apples. In 2010, Canada imported a total of 191,714 mt of fresh apples (Table 5). This represents a 22% increase over the last five years and a 5% increase from the previous year. The United States was Canada's biggest supplier of fresh apples, with a total of 150,618 mt (79% of all our fresh apple imports), worth an estimated $138 million. Chile has made steady gains over the years to become Canada's second largest supplier of fresh apples, with a total of 24,868 mt representing 13% of Canada's total fresh apple imports. New Zealand is Canada's third largest supplier of fresh apples, exporting 7,759 mt to Canada in 2010, followed by China and South Africa.

Table 5a – Canada's Top 5 Fresh Apple Import Sources in Metric Tonnes
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
United States 124,829 139,808 131,199 148,111 150,618
Chile 16,951 23,321 18,361 20,257 24,868
New Zealand 7,187 8,273 6,953 7,685 7,759
China 4,731 4,942 6,148 3,551 3,768
South Africa 2,639 2,995 2,816 1,919 2,334
Total - Canada 156,694 180,528 166,251 182,143 191,714
Table 5b – Canada's Top 5 Fresh Apple Import Sources by Value ($000)
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
United States 126,336 140,064 154,086 136,579 138,046
Chile 21,779 28,114 22,203 26,474 29,185
New Zealand 10,490 11,563 10,186 11,376 11,699
China 5,505 5,580 7,229 4,538 4,801
South Africa 3,409 4,216 3,701 2,797 3,638
Total - Canada 167,900 191,238 198,613 182,595 189,645

In 2010, the biggest importing province was Ontario, accounting for 39% of all imported fresh apples, followed closely by British Columbia with 38% (Table 6).

Table 6a – Fresh Apple Imports by Province in Metric Tonnes
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
Nova Scotia 44 212 469 214 64
New Brunswick 258 1,552 1,872 1,728 1,812
Quebec 22,907 27,825 26,724 34,127 41,118
Ontario 75,862 88,863 81,948 79,277 74,497
Manitoba 251 527 447 312 494
Saskatchewan 103 167 55 125 58
Alberta 1,311 1,872 2,408 2,941 1,280
British Columbia 55,958 59,511 52,328 63,418 72,392
Total - Canada 156,694 180,528 166,251 182,143 191,714
Table 6b – Value of Fresh Apple Imports by Province ($000)
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
Nova Scotia 43 331 757 365 106
New Brunswick 395 2,143 2,833 2,279 2,489
Quebec 17,424 21,275 20,184 23,395 23,614
Ontario 93,355 104,851 108,143 92,279 93,690
Manitoba 338 758 731 418 513
Saskatchewan 261 283 88 145 80
Alberta 2,378 2,956 4,421 4,155 1,791
British Columbia 53,706 58,640 61,456 59,558 67,362
Total - Canada 167,900 191,238 198,613 182,595 189,645

Table 7 highlights the varieties of fresh apples imported and the markets (fresh or processing) for which they are destined. Of the 191,714 mt of fresh apples imported in 2010, a total of 143,730 mt were imported for fresh consumption, which represents 75% of imports. The other 24% were used in some form of processing. Of the apples destined for fresh consumption, Gala is the most imported variety, followed by Red Delicious and Granny Smith.

Table 7a - Fresh Apple Imports by Type and Variety (Metric Tonnes)
Variety20062007200820092010

*Includes both certified and non-certified organic.

Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)

Fresh, For Processing*
McIntosh 2,264 4,157 5,526 7,108 6,037
Idared 4,681 3,102 2,522 2,899 5,610
Golden Delcious 1,251 734 895 668 3,295
Granny Smith 1,573 746 660 746 1,683
Gala 696 884 598 137 278
Red Delicious 4,719 3,788 69 101 80
Empire 36 581 109 301 20
Not Otherwise Specified 2,337 16,430 14,809 22,478 30,678
Total 17,557 30,423 25,188 34,438 47,682
Fresh, Other Than For Processing
Gala 41,671 47,702 47,046 50,460 57,337
Granny Smith 34,287 37,071 29,856 30,786 25,611
Red Delicious 20,550 21,416 19,774 19,349 18,707
Golden Delcious 17,921 12,608 14,322 14,316 11,216
Empire 512 1,081 245 874 745
McIntosh 310 542 371 371 444
Idared 62 121 82 261 97
Not Otherwise Specified 23,819 29,451 29,005 30,970 29,573
Total 139,132 149,992 140,701 147,385 143,730
Not Defined 4 112 362 319 303
Total - Canada 156,694 180,528 166,251 182,143 191,714

Table 7b - Fresh Apple Imports by Type and Variety (Value $000)
Variety20062007200820092010

*Includes both certified and non-certified organic.

Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)

Fresh, For Processing*
Idared 1,038 667 784 774 1,369
McIntosh 311 685 1,245 1,791 905
Golden Delcious 78 113 233 168 848
Granny Smith 95 107 186 206 266
Gala 44 84 126 24 46
Red Delicious 259 358 24 45 19
Empire 8 148 25 80 7
Not Otherwise Specified 218 2,742 3,643 2,876 3,959
Total 2,052 4,903 6,267 5,963 7,420
Fresh, Other Than For Processing
Gala 54,798 64,335 64,697 69,152 73,374
Granny Smith 38,796 41,020 40,242 33,150 33,066
Red Delicious 22,851 22,789 27,319 20,508 20,093
Golden Delcious 20,218 19,058 19,949 15,236 14,439
McIntosh 282 624 399 462 472
Empire 301 678 197 462 399
Idared 31 64 39 110 51
Not Otherwise Specified 28,565 37,598 38,923 37,068 39,910
Total 165,841 186,166 191,766 176,149 181,805
Not Defined 8 169 580 483 421
Total - Canada 167,900 191,238 198,613 182,595 189,645

Exports

Almost one-tenth of Canada's apple production was exported in 2010, with around 80% sent to the United States, followed by 8% to the United Kingdom and 6% to Mexico. Exports to Taiwan and Costa Rica seem to be recovering after a slump in 2009. The total value of Canada's apple exports was $24.6 million in 2010 (Table 8).

Table 8a – Canada's Top 5 Fresh Apple Export Destinations in Metric Tonnes
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
United States 34,855 31,081 36,036 21,098 20,923
United Kingdom 4,387 2,502 2,706 983 1,766
Mexico 5,521 2,685 2,182 1,446 1,497
Taiwan 567 688 221 137 1,288
Costa Rica 554 557 462 35 192
Total - Canada 47,836 38,811 42,484 25,509 25,969
Table 8b – Canada's Top 5 Fresh Apple Export Destinations in Value ($000)
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
United States 31,022 28,031 29,882 19,835 20,455
United Kingdom 4,394 2,801 2,893 1,640 1,750
Mexico 4,530 2,419 1,997 1,171 1,529
Taiwan 636 830 242 151 363
Costa Rica 521 536 475 33 181
Total - Canada 43,227 35,842 36,564 24,045 24,614

British Columbia is the largest exporting province in Canada, accounting for more than half of all Canadian fresh apple exports. Nova Scotia saw a significant increase in apple exports in 2010, representing an increase of 64% over 2009 (Table 9).

Table 9a – Fresh Apple Exports by Province in Metric Tonnes
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
Nova Scotia 2,121 1,585 1,759 1,593 2,619
New Brunswick 0 0 84 20 1
Quebec 5,577 3,674 4,182 1,495 1,038
Ontario 14,139 11,692 14,367 6,353 8,326
British Columbia 26,000 21,859 22,091 16,049 13,985
Total - Canada 47,836 38,811 42,484 25,509 25,969
Table 9b – Fresh Apple Exports by Province in Value ($000)
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
Nova Scotia 2,542 2,467 2,381 2,895 3,735
New Brunswick 0 0 21 5 0
Quebec 4,891 3,613 5,082 2,421 1,678
Ontario 8,220 5,486 8,242 3,396 6,389
British Columbia 27,574 24,276 20,837 15,328 12,811
Total - Canada 43,227 35,842 36,564 24,045 24,614

About 80% of all Canadian fresh apples exports are destined for fresh consumption, and the remaining 20% are destined for processing (Table 10).

Table 10a – Fresh Apple Exports by Type in Metric Tonnes
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
Fresh, For Processing 4,191 8,593 10,089 4,345 4,684
Fresh, Other Than For Processing 43,645 30,217 32,395 21,163 21,286
Total - Canada 47,836 38,811 42,484 25,509 25,969
Table 10b – Fresh Apple Exports by Type in Value ($000)
20062007200820092010
Source: Statistics Canada (Catsnet - June 6, 2011)
Fresh, For Processing 626 1,261 1,950 744 913
Fresh, Other Than For Processing 42,601 34,582 34,614 23,301 23,701
Total - Canada 43,227 35,842 36,564 24,045 24,614

World Trade

As shown in Table 11, in 2009, the Russian Federation was the world's largest importer of apples, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The Russian Federation imported just over 1 million mt of apples, about ten times the amount Canada imported in the same year. Canada ranks eighth in the world for imports of apples. China is the world's largest producer of apples and also the largest apple exporting country, with 1.17 million mt exported in 2009, of which 21% went to its major importing neighbor, Russia. The United States is the second largest apple exporting country, with 816,167 mt exported in 2009, followed by Poland, Italy and Chile.

Table 11a – Top 5 Global Importing Countries in 2009
RankImporting NationsQuantity (metric tonnes)
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, accessed February 17, 2012.
1 Russian Federation 1,108,210
2 Germany 622,564
3 United Kingdom 455,671
4 Netherlands 360,250
5 Ukraine 251,394
Table 11b – Top 5 Global Exporting Countries in 2009
RankExporting NationsQuantity (metric tonnes)
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, accessed February 17, 2012.
1 China 1,171,822
2 United States of America 816,167
3 Poland 777,071
4 Italy 732,794
5 Chile 678,629

Consumer Trends

Over the past few years, as Canadians have become more educated on the benefits of eating fresh fruit as a part of a healthy diet, fresh apple consumption has increased slightly. According to Statistics Canada, in 2009, the quantity of fresh apples available for consumption in Canada reached 12.08 kilograms per person, representing a 10% increase over the past five years. Consumption of processed apple products such as applesauce, apple pie filling and canned apples has been relatively stable over the past five years, with 1.02 kilograms per person reported in 2009, while apple juice consumption, at 7.23 litres per person in 2009, has also remained relatively unchanged (Table 12).

Table 12 – Apple Quantities Available for ConsumptionFootnote [6], Footnote [7], Footnote [8]
Type20052006200720082009
Source: Statistics Canada (21-020-X – Food Statistics)
FreshKilograms per person
10.95 11.33 10.9 11.16 12.08
ProcessedKilograms per person
1.05 1.11 1.11 1.15 1.02
JuiceLitres per person
7.18 7.13 7.05 6.96 7.23

Canadian consumers are increasingly moving towards convenience products when buying fruit at the grocery store. Pre-washed, pre-sliced or bagged fruit are items that appeal to today's apple consumers. The United States Department of Agriculture has even highlighted a Canadian trend of an increase of purchases of bags of 12 to 15 apples.Footnote [9] Sliced apples packaged in individual portions are becoming more and more popular, and can be a good way for producers to add value to the fruit.

Consumers are also moving to new varieties of apples. Honeycrisp and Ambrosia are among the most popular new varieties in Canada and command a premium compared to other more traditional varieties. Varieties like Gala and Fuji are becoming increasingly popular with consumers, while older varieties like Red Delicious are losing market share. McIntosh is still popular with consumers, notably for its continued use in juices.

Industry Challenges and Opportunities

Canadian apple growers are facing some unique challenges and continue to operate in an increasingly competitive environment. Marketplace pressures include world oversupply, retailer consolidation, the rising value of the Canadian currency and greater foreign competition in both domestic and export markets. In addition, apple growers, like many other farmers, are at the mercy of Mother Nature and have to deal with weather phenomena like hail and drought, as well as pests and diseases.

Imports are a major challenge for locally grown Canadian apples. The rising Canadian dollar has made American apples cheaper for wholesalers to purchase, despite the greater shipment distances. Capitalizing on the growing consumer trend to "buy local" and promoting the Canada brand could potentially help Canadian apple growers regain some of their lost market share on the domestic market.

The shift to new varieties of apples opens up new opportunities. As seen in the example of Honeycrisp and Ambrosia, new varieties become popular with consumers who are keen to try them, and can be sold at a premium. Value-added products like apple slices, frozen apple products and apple snacks all represent opportunities that respond to consumer demand for quick and convenient healthy foods.

Research and development is also very important in the apple industry's efforts to innovate by developing new varieties that appeal more to consumers, bruise less, taste and look better and are disease resistant.

Maps

Description of this image follows.
Canada's Top 5 Apple Export Destinations in 2010 - Figure 5

Figure 5 shows a map which displays percentages of Apple exports for various global destinations from Table 8. The largest percentage is the U.S with 83%, followed by the U.K with 7%, Mexico at 6%, and lastly, Costa Rica with 1%, and Taiwan with 1%.


Description of this image follows.
Canada's Top 5 Apple Import Sources in 2010 - Figure 6

Figure 6 shows a map which displays percentages of Apple imports for various global destinations form Table 5. The largest percentage is the U.S with 73% of imports, followed by Chile at 15%, New Zealand at 6%. China with 3%, and lastly, South Africa with 2%.

Key Resources

Statistics Canada. Publication 22-003-X "Fruit and Vegetable Production".

Statistics Canada. 2006 Census of Agriculture, Farm data and farm operator data, Publication 95-629-XWE.

Statistics Canada. Publication 21-020-X "Food Statistics".

Statistics Canada CATS database. Canadian Export and Import Data.

FAO Stat (July 2011).

Import and export data is based on the following Harmonized System Codes (H.S. Codes):

Imports: 0808101000, 0808101010, 0808101011, 0808101012, 0808101013, 0808101014, 0808101015,0808101016, 0808101017, 0808101019, 0808101020, 0808101030, 0808101040, 0808101050, 0808101060, 0808101070, 0808101081, 0808101082, 0808101083, 0808101084, 0808101089, 0808101090, 0808101091, 0808101092, 0808101093, 0808101094,0808101095, 0808101096, 0808101097, 0808101099, 0808109000.

Exports: 08081000, 08081010, 08081090.


Footnotes

Footnote 1

Farm Gate Value represents production values expressed as remuneration obtained at the "Farm Gate" and is related to gross returns to growers. This does not include program payments or other support payments made to producers.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Statistics Canada (22-003-X - Fruit and Vegetable Production).

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Total planted acreage for apples includes bearing and non-bearing areas.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

The number of farms growing apples reported in the Census of Agriculture refers to farms that report growing apples but do not necessarily grow apples exclusively. Some farms may be producing other commodities. Caution must be exercised when using these numbers.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Total Marketed Production is defined as the total quantity sold to the fresh and processing markets.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

For fresh and processed - Does not adjust for losses, such as waste and/or spoilage, in stores, households, private institutions or restaurants or losses during preparation.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

For fresh and processed - In retail weight unless otherwise specified.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

For juice - Experimental, use with caution. The data have been adjusted for retail, household, cooking and plate loss.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Government of Alberta, Agriculture and Rural Development. Consumer Trends for Fruit and Vegetable Products. http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/sis8439, accessed June 6, 2011.

Return to footnote 9 referrer


Alternative Formats

Help with Alternative Formats

A Snapshot of the Canadian Apple Industry, 2010 (PDF Version, 1.1 MB)