Sector Trend Analysis - Fish and seafood trends in Spain and Portugal

June 2018

Executive summary

  • In 2017, Portugal and Spain respectively had the third and fifth highest per capita fish and seafood consumption in the world, at US$353 and US$271 respectively. It is by far the two highest in Europe, and comparable to that of the Japanese.
  • Spain is undoubtedly the largest market for fish and seafood within the EU, with US$8.1 billion in imports in 2017. Despite its smaller size, Portugal remains a key fish and seafood market, worth US$2.4 billion.
  • Although Canada is not a key player yet on the Spanish and Portuguese fish and seafood markets, there has been interesting growth in Canadian imports since 2014 at a compound annual growth rate of 25% for Spain and 28% for Portugal.
  • Overall retail sales in the fish and seafood category have been declining in Spain in recent years, while growth in Portugal has been moderate. New trends such as the rise of single households may help explaining this trend.
  • In total, 612 new products containing fish or seafood as an ingredient were launched in the Spanish (582) and Portuguese (30) markets between January 2017 and Feburary 2018. The most popular categories were processed fish products, meals and meal centers, pet food, snacks and savoury spreads.

Contents

Introduction

Fishing is a major economic activity in Spain and Portugal, two countries that make up the vast majority of the Iberian peninsula. Despite their historical rivalry as two important sea powers, they enjoy friendly neighbouring relationships and are amongst each other's major trading partners. Cultural differences aside, Spain and Portugal also share a number of traits, tastes, and eating and shopping habits, along with other Mediterranean nations.

Fish and seafood are a central component of the Mediterranean culture. For locals and tourists, artisanal fishing communities, fish markets, seafood restaurants and maritime heritage are central to the region's unique economic, social and cultural identity. Fishers from European Mediterranean nations have been historically present in almost every world ocean, with the exception of the Antarctic Atlantic (WWF 2017).

Among Mediterranean nations and among the European Union member states, Portuguese and Spanish people are the two largest per capita consumers of fish and seafood (and only behind Norway if the whole Europe is being considered). In 2017, the Portuguese consumed a total of 52 kg of fish and seafood per capita – that is, one a kilo of fish per person every week – while Spanish consumers were not far behind with over 46 kg per capita.

Top ten Member States of the European Union, 2017
Per capita consumption of fish and seafood (based on retail volume)
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Description of the above image
Fresh fish Fresh seafood Processed fish and seafood Total fish and seafood
Portugal 36.7 7.5 3.8 51.7
Spain 15.7 8.7 8.6 48.0
Sweden 15.2 5.3 7.7 33.0
Finland 19.3 1.8 4.4 28.2
Denmark 11.7 2.9 6.3 25.5
Belgium 12.3 4.5 3.6 20.9
Ireland 11.6 2.4 4.6 20.0
United Kingdom 9.8 1.3 7.3 18.6
Netherlands 13.8 1.6 1.6 18.4
Greece 10.5 3.6 2.3 17.0
Germany 7.2 1.1 7.6 16.4
Italy 6.3 2.2 5.0 15.9
France 2.7 2.1 4.3 13.5

Due to a much larger population, the total consumption of fish and seafood in Spain is much higher than in Portugal. Home to more than 46 million people, Spain is the fifth-most populous country in the European Union (E.U.), while Portugal ranks 12th with an estimated population of over 10 million (Euromonitor International, 2018). Moreover, Spain was the second-most visited country in the world in 2017, recording 82 million tourists, and overtaking the United States for the first timeFootnote 1. Tourism is also booming in Portugal with a record of 20 million visitors in 2017Footnote 2. According to the Trade Commissioners in Madrid and Lisbon, since gastronomy is part of the "travel experience" in those countries, the boom in tourism directly affects fish and seafood consumption as well as the types of products on the market.

According to WWF (2017), fish-loving European Mediterranean nations import almost twice as much seafood as they produce domestically. Spain is the largest importer of fish and seafood in the E.U., and the fourth-largest in the world with US$8.1 billion in 2017, while Portugal's fish and seafood imports were valued at US$2.4 billion in 2017, placing it in the 16th position worldwide.

Trade overview

Five percent of the fish and seafood consumed by the Portuguese consumers comes from aquaculture while that figure goes up to twenty-percent in Spain (WWF 2017); however, wild species are still the preferred option among consumers. Due to the depletion of fish stocks and accessibility to fishing waters, imports are significant in order to meet domestic demand.

With imports worth US$8.1 billion in 2017, Spain is the top-most fish and seafood importer among E.U. countries and the fourth-largest market in the world, after the United States (US$23.0 billion), Japan (US$15.4 billion) and China (US$11.1 billion). Portugal ranks 16th worldwide for imports of fish and seafood (US$2.4 billion in 2017). Both Spanish and Portuguese imports have been growing at rates over 5.5% from 2013 to 2017 in terms of value. In terms of volume, Spain and Portugal respectively rank fifth and nineteenth.

World's major fish and seafood importers in value (US$ millions)
Country 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-17
Share in 2017
World 132,213.8 138,062.3 124,878.7 131,737.6 143,385.4 2.0%
1. United States 19,173.6 21,555.6 20,062.3 20,783.3 22,971.3 4.6% 16.0%
2. Japan 15,657.3 15,205.7 13,799.2 14,282.8 15,428.1 −0.4% 10.8%
3. China 8,405.8 8,967.7 8,773.4 9,122.3 11,110.5 7.2% 7.7%
4. Spain 6,463.7 6,978.6 6,503.0 7,178.5 8,065.3 5.7% 5.6%
5. France 6,722.7 6,781.3 5,939.1 6,341.7 6,880.9 0.6% 4.8%
6. Italy 5,784.7 6,123.0 5,575.5 6,198.4 6,609.9 3.4% 4.6%
7. Germany 5,650.2 6,118.8 5,278.2 5,752.3 5,753.1 0.5% 4.0%
8. South Korea 3,729.1 4,373.0 4,451.5 4,728.2 5,210.7 8.7% 3.6%
9. Sweden 4,481.8 4,761.4 4,414.4 5,182.0 4,941.7 2.5% 3.4%
10. United Kingdom 4,541.2 4,753.2 4,326.2 4,391.9 4,357.8 −1.0% 3.0%
Portugal (16) 1,913.1 2,076.5 1,944.9 2,123.1 2,374.6 5.6% 1.7%

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018.

*CAGR - compound annual growth rate

World’s major fish and seafood importers in volume (‘000 tonnes)
Country 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-17
Share in 2017
World 33,151,557 33,882,734 33,446,987 34,636,250 35,492,447 1.7%
1. China 4,158,541 4,282,923 4,077,821 4,025,395 4,889,705 4.1% 13.8%
2. United States 2,525,988 2,607,778 2,658,671 2,739,876 2,821,905 2.8% 8.0%
3. Japan 2,487,089 2,542,250 2,487,370 2,378,970 2,476,720 −0.1% 7.0%
4. Thailand 1,667,384 1,624,095 1,621,544 1,861,590 1,902,159 3.3% 5.4%
5. Spain 1,513,230 1,617,705 1,673,054 1,722,259 1,771,852 4.0% 5.0%
6. South Korea 1,215,209 1,362,141 1,410,298 1,447,498 1,481,364 5.1% 4.2%
7. Denmark 1,248,084 1,399,834 1,389,889 1,506,784 1,374,867 2.4% 3.9%
8. France 1,132,496 1,136,526 1,149,011 1,166,312 1,192,775 1.3% 3.4%
9. Germany 1,212,335 1,320,884 1,228,974 1,270,225 1,169,435 −0.9% 3.3%
10. Italy 996,920 1,058,103 1,081,936 1,110,214 1,150,640 3.7% 3.2%
Portugal (19) 462,550 475,888 483,911 509,384 525,585 3.2% 1.5%

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018.

*CAGR - compound annual growth rate

Spain

Spain has a diverse supplier network of fish and seafood products, with imports coming primarily from Morocco, Ecuador, Argentina, China, Portugal and France. The remaining suppliers each provide less than 4.0% of the market.

Morocco is Spain's largest supplier of fish and seafood since 2013 and the value of its supplies has been growing at a good pace. Other fast-growing suppliers are Mauritania and India. Portugal has also registered an interesting level of growth at a compound annual growth rate of 7.9%, replacing France in 2017 as the fifth main supplier of fish and seafood to Spain. Canada's share of imports has grown steadily since 2013, but remains small at 0.5%.

The top commodities imported by Spain are frozen shrimps and prawns (US$1.2 billion), frozen cuttlefish and squid (US$1.1 billion), prepared/preserved tuna, skipjack and Atlantic bonito (US$618 million), frozen octopus (US$574 million), and frozen yellowfin tuna (US$266 million).

Top fish and seafood suppliers to Spain (US$ millions)
Country 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-17
Share in 2017
World 6,463.7 6,978.6 6,503.0 7,178.5 8,065.3 2.7%
Morocco 504.0 618.9 603.4 701.0 797.4 8.6% 9.9%
Ecuador 458.6 448.9 439.0 460.3 572.6 0.1% 7.1%
Argentina 481.4 466.5 436.3 461.2 496.6 −1.1% 6.2%
China 355.8 347.3 347.3 406.0 466.3 3.4% 5.8%
Portugal 296.0 349.6 340.2 400.7 456.5 7.9% 5.7%
France 429.0 429.9 396.1 432.1 445.9 0.2% 5.5%
Mauritania 113.7 154.6 195.8 206.4 300.4 16.1% 3.7%
United Kingdom 233.4 274.0 229.5 253.3 280.1 2.1% 3.5%
India 153.7 200.4 197.8 222.7 271.8 9.7% 3.4%
Netherlands 229.7 280.7 243.7 263.5 269.3 3.5% 3.3%
Canada (43) 18.6 22.4 26.5 33.8 37.3 16.1% 0.5%

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018.

*CAGR - compound annual growth rate

Top ten fish and seafood commodities imported by Spain from the world in 2017 (US$ millions)
HS Code Product 2017 Market share
in 2017
Total fish and seafood imports 8,065.3
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns 1,227.5 15.2%
030743 Frozen cuttlefish and squid 1,134.7 14.1%
160414 Prepared/preserved tuna/skipjack/Atlantic bonito 618.1 7.7%
030752 Frozen octopus 574.2 7.1%
030342 Frozen yellowfin tuna 265.7 3.3%
030214 Fresh/chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 263.5 3.3%
030474 Frozen fillets of hake 247.4 3.1%
030254 Fresh/chilled hake 200.5 2.5%
030289 Fresh/chilled fish N.E.S.* 157.9 2.0%
030471 Frozen fillets of cod Addus morhua, Addus OGAC, Addus Acrocephalus 147.7 1.8%

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S. = Not Elsewhere Specified

Top ten fish and seafood suppliers to Spain in 2017 and their top five sub-sectors – Harmonized System (HS) codes and value in US$ millions

1. Morocco
HS Code Product 2017
030752 Frozen octopus 297.5
030743 Frozen cuttlefish/squid 187.7
030617 Frozen shrimp and prawns 60.1
160416 Prepared/preserved anchovies 56.5
030289 Fresh/chilled fish, N.E.S.* 21.0

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

2. Ecuador
HS Code Product 2017
160414 Prepared/preserved tuna/skipjack /Atlantic bonito 287.3
030617 Frozen shrimp and prawns 251.1
030487 Frozen tuna/skipjack/stripe-bellied bonito fillets 12.3
160420 Prepared/preserved fish 10.4
030342 Frozen yellowfin tuna 3.7

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

3. Argentina
HS Code Product 2017
030617 Frozen shrimp and prawns 389.4
030743 Frozen cuttlefish/squid 51.5
030474 Frozen hake fillets 37.9
030563 Salted/brined anchovies 5.2
030366 Frozen hake 5.1

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

4. China
HS Code Product 2017
030743 Frozen cuttlefish/squid 164.2
030617 Frozen shrimp and prawns 82.2
160414 Prepared/preserved tuna, skipjack and Atlantic bonito 44.7
030471 Frozen cod fillets 42.1
030481 Frozen fillets of Pacific salmon /Atlantic salmon/Danube salmon 18.9

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

5. Portugal
HS Code Product 2017
030752 Frozen octopus 47.4
030617 Frozen shrimp and prawns 44.3
030357 Frozen swordfish 27.4
030743 Frozen cuttlefish/squid 24.8
030771 Live/fresh/chilled clams/cockles/arkshells 24.1

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

6. France
HS Code Product 2017
030254 Fresh/chilled hake 103.5
030289 Fresh/chilled fish N.E.S.* 48.9
030742 Live/fresh/chilled cuttlefish/squid 33.2
030229 Fresh/chilled flat fish (excluding halibut, plaice, sole and turbot) 23.4
030342 Frozen yellowfin tuna 19.2

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

7. Mauritania
HS Code Product 2017
030752 Frozen octopus 163.4
030743 Frozen cuttlefish/squid 46.0
030289 Fresh/chilled fish N.E.S.* 34.5
030285 Fresh/chilled sea bream 10.1
030389 Frozen fish N.E.S.* 7.8

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

8. United Kingdom
HS Code Product 2017
030254 Fresh/chilled hake 40.9
030615 Frozen Norway lobster, even smoked 23.8
030743 Frozen cuttlefish/squid 21.0
030229 Fresh/chilled flat fish (excluding halibut, plaice, sole and turbot) 18.2
030289 Fresh/chilled fish N.E.S.* 17.3

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

9. India
HS Code Product 2017
030743 Frozen cuttlefish/squid 221.2
030617 Frozen shrimp and prawns 32.8
160420 Prepared/preserved fish 5.2
030749 Smoked/dried/salted/brined cuttlefish/squid 2.3
030499 Frozen fish meat N.E.S.*, excluding fillets 2.0

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

10. Netherlands
HS Code Product 2017
030471 Frozen cod fillets 35.3
030223 Fresh or chilled sole 18.0
030617 Frozen shrimp and prawns 15.1
030532 Dried/salted/brined fish fillets of the families breg., eucl., gad., macr., melan., mor., merl., mur. 14.7
160556 Prepared/preserved clams/cockles/arkshells 13.4

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Spain in 2017

Portugal

In Portugal, total imports of fish and seafood have been growing at a 5.5% CAGR from 2013 to 2017, reaching US$2,369.4 million in value in 2017. Spain is by far Portugal’s main supplier with a 38.2% share in 2017. The quantity supplied Spain to Portugal is almost twice the quantity that is supplied by Portugal to Spain. Sweden is the second-largest supplier of fish and seafood to Portugal with a 10.3% share, followed by the Netherlands with 9.3%, China with 4.6%, and Denmark with 3.1%. Portuguese imports from Canada have undergone strong growth at 53.7% compound annual growth rate from 2013 to 2017, yet Canada’s share of the market remains small at less than 1%.

Portugal's main global fish and seafood imports in 2017 included frozen shrimp and prawns (US$217.5 million), dried cod (US$216.4 million), frozen cod (US$180.6 million), frozen cuttlefish and squid (US$156.2 million) and frozen octopus (US$141.0 million).

Top fish and seafood suppliers to Portugal (US$ millions)
Country 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-17
Share
in 2017
World 913.1 2,076.5 1,944.9 2,123.1 2,369.4 5.5%
Spain 801.2 850.2 762.9 819.1 904.7 3.1% 38.2%
Sweden 235.3 299.7 258.1 251.3 245.2 1.0% 10.3%
Netherlands 156.3 182.4 187.4 201.7 220.8 9.0% 9.3%
China 76.9 74.4 78.2 82.3 110.1 9.4% 4.6%
Denmark 60.1 40.9 53.7 66.9 73.6 5.2% 3.1%
India 38.2 56.9 46.1 51.3 62.6 13.1% 2.6%
Greece 39.0 37.4 40.1 46.8 55.2 9.1% 2.3%
Russia 25.9 23.0 26.9 37.3 50.2 18.0% 2.1%
Germany 28.4 34.0 28.7 36.0 49.1 14.7% 2.1%
Viet-Nam 43.8 44.7 43.5 45.9 43.1 −0.4% 1.8%
Canada (42) 0.7 1.8 2.5 4.2 4.1 53.7% 0.2%

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018.

*CAGR - compound annual growth rate

Top ten fish and seafood commodities imported by Portugal from the world in 2017 (US$ millions)
HS Code Product 2017 Market share
in 2017
Total fish and seafood imports 2,369.4  
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns 217.5 9.2%
030551 Dried cod Gadus morhua / Gadus ogac / Gadus macrocephalus, excluding fillets and offals 216.4 9.1%
030363 Frozen cod Addus morhua / Addus Ogac / Addus Acrocephalus 180.6 7.6%
030743 Frozen cuttlefish and squid 156.2 6.6%
030752 Frozen octopus 141.0 6.0%
030562 Salted/brineds cod Gadus morhua / Gadus ogac / Gadus macrocephalus, excluding fillets and offals 137.1 5.8%
160414 Prepared/preserved tunas/skipjack/Atlantic bonito 117.6 5.0%
030285 Fresh/chilled sea bream 80.2 3.4%
030366 Frozen hake 70.4 3.0%
030214 Fresh/chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 60.1 2.5%
Source:  Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Top ten fish and seafood suppliers to Portugal in 2017 and their top sub-sectors
Harmonized System (HS) codes and value in US$ millions

1. Spain
HS Code Product 2017
030752 Frozen octopus 79.1
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns 73.4
160414 Prepared/preserved tuna, skipjack and Atlantic bonito 69.7
030743 Frozen cuttlefish and squid 58.1
030366 Frozen hake 50.2

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

2. Sweden
HS Code Product 2017
030551 Dried cod 122.7
030562 Salted/brined cod 65.6
030214 Fresh/chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 25.4
030251 Fresh/chilled cod 9.5
030219 Fresh/chilled Salmonidae (excl. trout and Pacific/Atlantic/Danube salmon) 7.2

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

3. Netherlands
HS Code Product 2017
030363 Frozen cod 84.5
030562 Salted/brined cod 38.2
030551 Dried cod 35.6
030279 Fresh/chilled Nile perch and snakeheads 6.2
160521 Prepared/preserved shrimps and prawns, not in airtight containers 6.2

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

4. China
HS Code Product 2017
030743 Frozen cuttlefish and squid 39.2
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns 11.9
030562 Salted/brined cod 11.5
030559 Dried/salted (but not smoked) fish, N.E.S.* 9.7
030481 Frozen fillets of Pacific salmon/ Atlantic salmon/ Danube salmon 4.2

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

5. Denmark
HS Code Product 2017
030551 Dried cod 22.4
030214 Fresh/chilled Atlantic salmon and Danube salmon 18.8
030363 Frozen cod 8.9
030562 Salted/brined cod 6.5
030251 Fresh/chilled cod 3.5

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

6. India
HS Code Product 2017
030743 Frozen cuttlefish and squid 30.5
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns 25.5
030799 Smoked/dried/salted/brined molluscs and mollusc flours/meals /pellets fit for human consumption 1.6
030749 Smoked/dried/salted/brined cuttlefish and squid 1.4
030389 Frozen fish N.E.S.* 1.4

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

7. Greece
HS Code Product 2017
030285 Fresh/chilled sea bream 30.8
030284 Fresh/chilled seabass 21.6
030289 Fresh/chilled fish N.E.S.* 2.0
030259 Fresh/chilled fish of the families breg., eucl., gad., macr., melan., mor., merl., mur. 0.5
030389 Frozen fish N.E.S.* 0.05

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

8. Russia
HS Code Product 2017
030363 Frozen cod 44.2
030551 Dried cod 5.8
030562 Salted/brined cod 0.1
030559 Dried/salted (but not smoked) fish, N.E.S.* 0.02
No fifth sub-sector for Russia in 2017

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

*N.E.S.= not elsewhere specified

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

9. Germany
HS Code Product 2017
030551 Dried cod 17.5
030562 Salted/brined cod 8.1
030481 Frozen fillets of Pacific salmon/ Atlantic salmon/ Danube salmon 5.2
160419 Prepared/preserved fish 4.4
030363 Frozen cod 2.2

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

10. Viet-Nam
HS Code Product 2017
160556 Prepared/preserved clams/cockles/arkshells 18.8
030462 Frozen fillets of catfish 5.8
030357 Frozen swordfish 5.1
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns 4.1
030743 Frozen cuttlefish and squid 2.9

Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Note: figures are based on the value of imports reported by Portugal in 2017

Canada's performance

Among Canada's overall agri-food and seafood exports to Spain, fish and seafood represented 14% of total export value. In 2017, Canada's five main agri-food exports to Spain were soybeans, lentils, corn, lobsters and dog/cat food. In the case of Portugal, fish and seafood represented 1.1% of Canada's total agri-food and seafood exports to this country in 2017. Canada's five main agri-food exports to Portugal were soybeans, corn, rape/canola seeds, lentils and beans.

Both countries have undergone interesting growth as fish and seafood export markets for Canada, at a compound annual growth rate of 25% for Spain and 28% for Portugal from 2014 to 2017.

According to Global Trade Tracker, in 2017, Canada ranked 42nd as a supplier of fish and seafood products to Spain and 43rd as a supplier to Portugal, with US$ 37.3 million in worth of Spanish imports and US$4.1 million in Portuguese imports. Spain and Portugal’s top fish and seafood imports from Canada in 2017 are presented in the tables below.

Spanish imports from Canada increased by 10.5% in value terms from 2016 to 2017. Much of this growth can be attributed to gains in the supply of prepared/preserved lobster, excluding smoked (+1,431.6% over the previous year); extracts/juices of meat, fish or crustaceans/molluscs/other aquatic invertebrates +435.6% over the last year); and salted and brined cod (+263.5% over the previous year).

Top ten fish and seafood commodities supplied by Canada to Spain in 2017
HS Code Description US$ ‘000 tonnes
030612 Frozen lobster 17,153,592 1,036
030632 Live/fresh/chilled lobster 6,633,273 375
030562 Salted/brined cod Gadus morhua, Gadus ogac, Gadus macrocephalus, excluding fillets and offals 3,922,332 814
030254 Fresh or chilled hake 3,357,005 1,393
030722 Frozen scallops, incl. queen scallops of the genera Pecten, Chlamys or Placopecten 2,563,859 83
030312 Frozen Pacific salmon, excluding sockeye red salmon 2,021,834 500
160300 Extracts/juices of meat, fish or crustaceans/molluscs/other aquatic invertebrates 729,373 106
030616 Frozen cold-water shrimp and prawns 638,235 151
030791 Live/fresh/chilled molluscs and molluscs flours/meals/pellets fit for human consumption 72,613 8
030366 Frozen hake 67,145 44
Total crustaceans 24,464,339 1,581
Total fish: live, fresh, frozen, processed 10,213,824 2,912
Total molluscs 2,636,472 92
Total fish and seafood commodities supplied by Canada to Spain 37,334,266 4,586
Source:Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Portuguese imports from Canada declined by −0.8% in value terms from 2016 to 2017. Only salted/brined cod and live eels recorded growth (+130.6% and +3.9% respectively over the previous year). Major declines in the supply of top commodities such as frozen Pacific salmon (−10.7% over the previous year) frozen flat fish (−44.7%) and frozen cod (−57.6) can help explain this decline.

Top ten fish and seafood commodities supplied by Canada to Portugal in 2017
HS Code Description US$ ‘000 tonnes
030312 Frozen Pacific salmon, excluding sockeye red salmon 1,805,232 531
030562 Salted/brined cod Gadus morhua, Gadus ogac, Gadus macrocephalus, excluding fillets and offals 1,274,520 269
030339 Frozen flat fish (excluding halibut, plaice, sole and turbot) 541,112 271
030632 Live/fresh/chilled lobster 223,621 10
030366 Frozen hake 108,071 74
030192 Live eels 84,912 8
030363 Frozen cod Addus morhua, Addus OGAC, Addus Acrocephalus 58,174 21
030771 Live/fresh/chilled clams/cockles/arkshells 24,853 1
030617 Frozen shrimps and prawns 10,725 Less than 1 tonne
030495 Frozen meat of fish of the families breg., eucl., gad., macr., melan., mor., merl., mur. 6,867 3
Total fish: live, fresh, frozen, processed 3,883,063 1,178
Total crustaceans 223,621 11
Total molluscs 24,853 1
Total fish and seafood commodities supplied by Canada to Portugal 4,142,262 1,189
Source: Global Trade Tracker, 2018

Retail sales and trends

Overall consumer trends

European Mediterranean consumers like fresh fish, and species they see as "local". In general terms they prefer small pelagic fish (sardines, anchovies etc), as well as tuna, mussels, shrimps, cephalopods (octopus, squid etc), hake, sea bream and sea bass. Small pelagic fish make up 30 per cent of European Mediterranean landings, but many of the other most commonly seen species are heavily dependent on imports, especially now that populations of iconic Mediterranean species like swordfish have decreased (WWF 2017).

In Mediterranean countries, bulk purchases of whole and fresh fish are still common, whereas in northern European markets, fish is usually processed, portioned and packaged prior to reaching the end buyer. In the U.K., for example, 90% of all fish is packaged and branded, whereas in Spain and Portugal this proportion drops down to 35%. Frozen fish accounts for a large majority of this processed market (EUMOFA 2017).

Similar to other Western European countries where incomes are generally higher than in other parts of the world, the average consumer is increasingly looking for more variety in their diets requiring high standards on different fronts, such as food safety, freshness, diversity and convenience. Furthermore, although to a lesser extent than in other Western European countries, consumption is increasingly determined by quality assurances, such as traceability, packing requirements and processing controls (Euromonitor International, 2017). Consumers and major distributors are increasingly concerned about the sustainability and risk of depletion of marine stocksFootnote 3.

The demand for food that promotes health and well-being has also increased in recent years, and fish has a particular importance in this respect due to the perceived health benefits of eating fish and growing evidence in that regard (Euromonitor International, 2017).

As seen in the charts below, consumer expenditure on fish and seafood is steadily increasing in both Spain and Portugal, and according to forecasts, this trend should continue. Although a bigger share of the annual consumer expenditure in spent on meat, the historical and forecast compound annual growth rates for meat are lower than those for fish and seafood. Indeed, a large number of Spaniards, particularly older generations, tend to prefer fish and seafood over meat products (Euromontior International, 2017) and the same may hold true for Portugal.

Historic and forecast consumer expenditure on fish and seafood in Spain
Categories 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* 2015-17 2018F 2019F 2020F CAGR* 2018-20
Total spending on food (US$ million) 89,274.9 93,015.4 97,965.5 4.8% 101,700.7 105,243.7 108,561.2 3.3%
Total spending on fish and seafood (US$ million) 11,548.8 11,964.5 12,627.2 4.6% 13,137.7 13,624.3 14,079.3 3.5%
% share of spending on fish and seafood 12.9% 12.9% 12.9% −0.2% 12.9% 12.9% 13.0% 0.2%
% share of spending on meat 23.9% 23.9% 23.7% −0.4% 23.6% 23.4% 23.3% −0.5%
Spending on fish and seafood per capita (US$) 248.6 257.6 271.4 4.5% 282.1 292.5 302.4 3.5%
Spending on meat per capita 459.1 477.8 499.0 4.3% 514.4 529.0 543.3 2.8%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2015.

F = Forecast

CAGR*: Compound Annual Growth Rate.

Historic and forecast consumer expenditure on fish and seafood in Portugal
Categories 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* 2015-17 2018F 2019F 2020F CAGR* 2018-20
Total spending on food (US$ million) 22,074.6 22,883.7 23,681.3 3.6% 24,407.0 25,097.7 25,844.4 2.9%
Total spending on fish and seafood (US$ million) 3,365.8 3,502.0 3,642.9 4.0% 3,779.5 3,913.0 4,048.2 3.5%
% share of spending on fish and seafood 15.2% 15.3% 15.4% 0.4% 15.5% 15.6% 15.7% 0.6%
% share of spending on meat 23.6% 23.4% 23.1% −1.1% 22.8% 22.5% 22.3% −1.1%
Spending on fish and seafood per capita (US$) 324.4 338.6 353.4 4.4% 367.7 381.8 396.2 3.8%
Spending on meat per capita 502.8 518.8 531.3 2.8% 542.0 552.2 565.1 2.1%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2015.

F = Forecast

CAGR*: Compound Annual Growth Rate.

Retail sales in Spain

Overall sales have been on a declining trend in Spain since 2013, which may be due in part to the rise of single households and the number of consumers living alone who are less likely to purchase fish and seafood products. The young segments of the population consume much less fish and seafood than older generations due to new lifestyles and more packaged and ready meals available (Euromonitor International, 2017).

Fresh fish is the most important category reaching 456.3 tonnes in 2017. Hake is the favourite type of Spanish consumers but imported species, such as salmon, are slowly gaining favour. Salmon replaced cod as the second most consumed fish in Spain, especially among young consumers. (EUMOFA 2017).

Crustaceans and molluscs/cephalopods traditionally play a central role in the Spanish food culture; both categories represent together 26% of total volume sales, but have also registered a negative performance over 2013-2017. According to industry sources (cited in Euromonitor International, 2017), there is an ongoing trend to control portion sizes. Prices are increasing, but seafood remains an important part of the everyday diet and used in the preparation of celebratory dishes. Processed fish and seafood only represented 8% of total volume sales in 2017; shelf stable products made up most of that category (74%).

Like in other Mediterranean countries, Spanish people consume a very diverse supply of fish and seafood and they tend to prefer fresh over processed. Fresh products is still the biggest seller in Spain, accounting for 64.3% of total volume sales, but frozen products, the smallest category within processed fish and seafood, have been the best performing in terms of value. According to the Trade Commissioner service in Spain, one good reason for the excellent performance of frozen products is a Spanish regulation (REAL DECRETO 1420/06, de 1 de diciembre) that dictates that any fish served raw or almost raw (smoked, marinated, etc.) has to be frozen for at least 24 hours before being served. The convenience and ease of preparation offered by frozen products may also help in explaining this trend. In terms of volume, shelf-stable fish and seafood (preserved in oil, salt or brined, or pickled, and sold in cans or jars) in the processed industry is the only category that posted a positive compound annual growth rate during the review period.

Historic retail value sales of fish and seafood in Spain
US$ millions and period growth (%) – Current prices – Fixed 2017 exchange rates
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-2017
Total fresh fish/seafood 8,546.5 8,259.3 8,051.1 7,913.9 7,723.5 −2.5%
Crustaceans 1,671.5 1,586.6 1,531.9 1,508.9 1,467.0 −3.2%
Fish 4,964.0 4,816.5 4,730.9 4,685.9 4,583.4 −2.0%
Molluscs and cephalopods 1,911.0 1,856.2 1,788.3 1,719.1 1,673.0 −3.3%
Total processed fish/seafood 2,405.2 2,362.7 2,337.9 2,342.5 2,360.5 −0.5%
Shelf stable 1,922.3 1,882.0 1,857.9 1,866.2 1,884.9 −0.5%
Chilled 293.2 290.0 287.5 284.6 283.5 −0.8%
Frozen 189.6 190.8 192.5 191.6 192.1 0.3%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Forecast retail value sales of fish and seafood in Spain
US$ millions and period growth (%) – Current prices – Fixed 2017 exchange rates
Category 2018F 2019F 2020F 2021F 2022F CAGR*
2018-2022
Total fresh fish/seafood 7,556.9 7,393.9 7,302.4 7,221.8 7,161.7 −1.3%
Crustaceans 1,404.4 1,332.9 1,287.3 1,245.7 1,209.8 −3.7%
Fish 4,518.5 4,456.2 4,435.1 4,418.1 4,412.0 −0.6%
Molluscs and cephalopods 1,634.0 1,604.8 1,580.1 1,558.0 1,540.0 −1.5%
Total processed fish/seafood 2,406.6 2,457.4 2,511.1 2,566.8 2,622.3 2.2%
Shelf stable 1,926.4 1,969.6 2,014.9 2,061.6 2,107.8 2.3%
Chilled 286.2 289.5 293.5 298.0 302.9 1.4%
Frozen 194.0 198.3 202.7 207.2 211.6 2.2%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

F = Forecast

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Historic total volume sales of fish and seafood in Spain – ‘000 tonnes and period growth (%)
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-2017
Total fresh fish/seafood 1,261.9 1,215.7 1,195.9 1,171.7 1,137.1 −2.6%
Crustaceans 175.7 169.2 166.7 164.7 159.6 −2.4%
Fish 802.9 770.0 760.0 751.4 731.2 −2.3%
Molluscs and cephalopods 283.4 276.5 269.2 255.6 246.4 −3.4%
Total processed fish/seafood 392.5 395.1 392.2 395.3 399.6 0.4%
Shelf stable 310.6 315.8 315.0 318.9 324.2 1.1%
Chilled 32.4 30.3 29.3 28.9 28.7 −3.0%
Frozen 49.5 49.0 47.9 47.4 46.7 −1.4%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Forecast total volume sales of fish and seafood in Spain – ‘000 tonnes and period growth (%)
Category 2018F 2019F 2020F 2021F 2022F CAGR*
2018-2022
Total fresh fish/seafood 1,111.5 1,089.2 1,074.7 1,062.3 1,053.6 −1.3%
Crustaceans 153.7 147.5 143.5 140.0 137.3 −2.8%
Fish 717.7 706.3 699.9 694.6 691.3 −0.9%
Molluscs and cephalopods 240.0 235.4 231.3 227.7 225.0 −1.6%
Total processed fish/seafood 403.9 408.5 413.0 417.2 421.3 1.1%
Shelf stable 329.4 334.4 339.2 343.5 347.6 1.4%
Chilled 28.5 28.4 28.3 28.3 28.3 −0.2%
Frozen 46.0 45.7 45.5 45.4 45.4 −0.3%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

F = Forecast

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Organic fish and seafood in Spain in 2017 only represented 0.3% of the total fish and seafood market. Since the majority of consumption comes from wild fish, there is not a lot of room to offer any organic alternative. The volume of organic fish sold on the retail market has been growing at a 2.4% compound annual growth rate from 2013 to 2017. This rate is low if we compared it to the rate of organic fish and seafood in other E.U. countries such as France (23%), Germany (13%) or the United Kingdom (10%). Indeed, even though sustainable and/or environmentally friendly product lines are slowly being developed by Spanish producers, these are typically meant to be exported to other markets (U.K., Germany, Denmark) with higher demand for these characteristics. (EUMOFA, 2017)

The organic* fish and seafood market in Spain
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-2017
Retail volume sales of organic fish and seafood in ‘000 tonnes 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.2 2.2 2.4%
Retail volume sales of organic fish and seafood as a percentage of total volume 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.3% Not applicable

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

*NOTE: Data on organic fish and seafood sales is not available for Portugal.

Retail sales in Portugal

Portuguese seafood consumption is also characterized by a wide diversity of species and preparing modes. Portugal has experienced slight economic growth in recent times along with unemployment levels expected to decrease over the next few years; these economic factors are having a positive effect on consumer confidence which is gradually regaining stabilityFootnote 4.

Sardines, cod (near to 40% of the national seafood demand), octopus, perch, tuna and swordfish, also horse mackerel, shrimp and sea bream are popular among Portuguese people. (EUMOFA 2017). There has been a marked decrease in volume sales in the dominant category of fresh fish and seafood as consumers are buying more and more processed fish and seafood products. In fact the processed food category is undergoing stronger growth and is expected to grow at stronger rates than Spain up to 2022.

In general, the chilled format is preferred over frozen, salted/dried, canned and smoked and a higher value is placed on whole fish rather than fish steaks and fillets. Consumption of frozen products and ready-to-cook meals has increased, not only because of the economic crisis (fresh/chilled fish are generally more expensive), but also because lifestyles have changed. The Portuguese market is very price-conscious and negotiations with partners are hard (EUMOFA 2017)

Historic retail value sales of fish and seafood in Portugal
US$ millions and period growth (%) – Current prices – Fixed 2017 exchange rates
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-2017
Total processed fish/seafood 272.9 281.3 288.0 295.6 301.3 2.5%
Shelf stable 174.2 182.6 188.2 193.9 198.6 3.3%
Chilled 58.4 57.8 57.4 58.3 58.9 0.2%
Frozen 40.2 40.8 42.3 43.4 43.8 2.2%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Note: Data on value sales of fresh fish and seafood is not available.

Forecast retail value sales of fish and seafood in Portugal
US$ millions and period growth (%) – Current prices – Fixed 2017 exchange rates
Category 2018F 2019F 2020F 2021F 2022F CAGR*
2018-2022
Total processed fish/seafood 310.2 320.5 332.2 345.3 359.0 3.7%
Shelf stable 205.3 212.7 221.1 230.2 239.7 3.9%
Chilled 60.3 62.0 64.2 66.7 69.4 3.6%
Frozen 44.6 45.7 47.0 48.4 50.0 2.9%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

F = Forecast

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Note: Data on value sales of fresh fish and seafood is not available.

Historic total volume sales of fish and seafood in Portugal – ‘000 tonnes and period growth (%)
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR*
2013-2017
Total fresh fish/seafood 504.1 490.7 481.4 471.9 456.3 −2.5%
Crustaceans 17.8 17.1 16.8 16.2 15.6 −3.2%
Fish 415.9 405.1 398.2 391.1 378.7 −2.3%
Molluscs and cephalopods 70.4 68.5 66.4 64.6 61.9 −3.2%
Total processed fish/seafood 36.1 35.7 37.5 38.6 39.5 2.3%
Shelf stable 26.3 26.0 27.7 28.5 29.2 2.6%
Chilled 5.5 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 0.9%
Frozen 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.5 1.1%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Forecast total volume sales of fish and seafood in Portugal – ‘000 tonnes and period growth (%)
Category 2018F 2019F 2020F 2021F 2022F CAGR*
2018-2022
Total fresh fish/seafood 445.4 436.4 430.5 425.4 421.7 −1.4%
Crustaceans 15.0 14.3 13.9 13.5 13.2 −3.1%
Fish 370.3 363.3 359.0 355.3 352.7 −1.2%
Molluscs and cephalopods 60.1 58.8 57.6 56.6 55.7 −1.9%
Total processed fish/seafood 40.2 40.9 41.6 42.3 43.1 1.8%
Shelf stable 29.8 30.4 30.9 31.5 32.0 1.8%
Chilled 5.8 5.9 6.0 6.2 6.3 2.1%
Frozen 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.8 1.1%

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

F = Forecast

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

Market concentration by company

Spain’s processed fish and seafood market is dominated by private label, with 45.3% share in 2017. Calvo Group with its Calvo brand (8.0% market share) has positioned itself as a top player in the processed fish and seafood market in Spain but is being challenged since 2015 by the Bolton Group (Isabel brand, 7.7% market share). In Portugal, the sector is also dominated by private label (40.1% share in 2017). The number one player is Cofaco - Comercial e Fabril de Conservas SA with its two major brands, Bom Petisco and Tenório, which together account for 13.4% of the market.

Market concentration for processed fish and seafood in Spain, by company
% breakdown, based on retail sales value
Company 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 PP* change
2013-17
Grupo Calvo SA 8.1 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 −0.1
Bolton Group, The - - 7.6 7.6 7.7 +7.7
Hijos de Carlos Albo SA 4.8 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 +0.2
JEALSA Rianxeira SA 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.5 2.6 +0.8
Ubago Group Mare SL 2.5 2.5 2.6 2.6 2.6 +0.1
Pescanova SA, Grupo 2.1 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 +0.3
Frigorificos del Noroeste SA (FRINSA) 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.3 +0.9
Escuris SA 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.1 +0.5
Angulas Aguinaga SA 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.6 +0.3
Caladero SL 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 +0.0
Private Label 51.7 49.8 48.7 46.7 45.3 −6.4
Others 24.0 25.2 17.9 18.9 19.8 +3.0

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*PP = percentage point

Market concentration for processed fish and seafood in Portugal, by company
% breakdown, based on retail sales value
Company 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 PP* change 2013-17
Cofaco - Comercial e Fabril de Conservas SA 11.2 11.4 12.9 13.1 13.4 +2.2
Ramirez & Co Filhos SA 7.0 7.0 7.9 8.0 8.2 +1.2
Coresa Conserveiros Reunidos SA 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.5 4.6 +0.9
Vensy España SA 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.3 −0.4
Fábricas Vasco da Gama - Indústria Transformadora 3.4 3.3 3.7 3.7 3.8 +0.4
Pescanova SA, Grupo 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.8 +0.1
Nomad Foods Ltd - - 3.3 3.4 3.4 +3.4
Seirokbat SL 3.8 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.4 −0.4
Angulas Aguinaga SA 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.4 −0.2
Conserveira do Sul Lda 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.4 1.4 +0.1
Private Label 46.7 45.5 41.6 41.1 40.1 −6.6
Others 12.0 13.2 10.7 10.8 11.4 +2.7

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*PP = percentage point

When it comes to fresh fish and seafood, over 82% of the fresh products are sold unpackaged in Spain. Vending from climate controlled machines are further increasing access to consumers after hours. Such machines are operated by fishmongers in residential areas of Spain. In terms of distribution, the institutional channel has been growing the fastest in recent years.

Distribution (% breakdown) of fresh fish and seafood in Spain
Based on historic total volume sales
Category 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 CAGR* 2013-2017
Retail 79.0 78.2 77.7 76.7 75.4 −1.2%
Foodservice 18.5 19.1 19.6 19.9 20.1 2.1%
Institutional 2.5 2.7 2.7 3.4 4.5 15.8%
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: Euromonitor International, 2018

*CAGR= Compound Annual Growth Rate

NOTE: Data not available for Portugal

New product launch analysis

According to Mintel (2018), 612 new products in total containing fish or seafood as an ingredient were launched on the Spanish and Portuguese markets between January 2017 and Feburary 2018 . Out of these, about half (305) were processed fish products. Other major categories for fish-containing products were meals and meal centers (108)Footnote 5, pet food (106), snacks (28) and savoury spreads (28). These five categories together represent 88% of the new products launched in 2017.

The top twenty ingredients for these five top categories are presented in the next chart.

Most popular types of fish/seafood contained in products launched in Spain/Portugal between Jan.2017 and Feb. 2018, by category

% of the total sample for the category
Type of fish or seafood Processed
fish products
Meals and
meal centers
Pet food Savoury spreads Snacks
Fish and fish products* 6.7% 27.8% 38.7% 28.6% 17.9%
Prawn 8.5% 30.6% 1.9% 3.6% 10.7%
Tuna 6.7% 24.1% 8.5% 14.3% 7.1%
Shellfish 8.5% 12.0% 3.8% 14.3% 10.7%
Salmon 3.7% 5.6% 17.9% 7.1% 14.3%
Fish fats 0.0% 0.0% 34.9% 0.0% 0.0%
Cod 6.3% 9.3% 1.9% 10.7% 25.0%
Squid 5.9% 19.4% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Hake 2.6% 5.6% 0.0% 17.9% 7.1%
Shrimp 1.9% 9.3% 1.9% 0.0% 25.0%
Surimi 3.7% 9.3% 0.0% 17.9% 7.1%
Sardine 9.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Mussel 4.1% 8.3% 0.0% 0.0% 7.1%
Crab 1.9% 8.3% 0.0% 10.7% 10.7%
Atlantic salmon 5.2% 2.8% 2.8% 0.0% 3.6%
Anchovy 1.1% 0.9% 0.0% 21.4% 3.6%
Monk fish 0.7% 11.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Octopus 4.1% 3.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Squid ink 0.7% 3.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Fish broth 0.4% 7.4% 3.8% 0.0% 3.6%
Total number of launches per category 270 108 106 28 28

* “Fish products and fish products” includes fresh, frozen, dried, preserved, smoked, or canned fish, shellfish (shrimp/prawns, oysters, mussels, clams, crab, oysters), squid, octopus and lobster. It includes also breaded products that are not positioned as hors d’oeuvres and also seafood and vegetable mixes.

Source: Mintel, 2018

Percentage of products containing fish and seafood launched in Spain/Portugal between Jan.2017 and Feb. 2018, by launch type
Description of this image follows.
Description of above image
New variety/range extension New product New packaging Relaunch New formulation
Portugal 33.33% 60.00% 3.33% 3.33% 0.00%
Spain 54.47% 24.74% 14.26% 5.50% 1.03%

Source: Mintel, 2018

Other key attributes of products containing fish and seafood launched in Spain/Portugal between Jan.2017 and Feb. 2018, by category

Number of product launches, by category - Top Claims
Attribute Processed fish/ seafood products Meals and meal centers Pet food Savoury spreads Snacks
Low/no/reduced allergen 55 24 16 1 6
Gluten free 54 21 1 1 6
Microwaveable 25 46 0 5 0
No additives/preservatives 15 11 37 2 2
Premium 33 13 16 4 6
Ethical - environmentally friendly package 24 9 20 3 1
Convenient packaging 44 2 20 1 1
Ease of use 25 24 0 6 1
Pet - adult 0 0 58 0 0
Social media 13 10 18 3 1
Number of product launches, by category - Top Packagings
Attribute Processed fish/ seafood products Meals and meal centers Pet food Savoury spreads Snacks
Can 112 10 13 3 0
Tray 50 55 14 6 6
Flexible 53 17 30 0 13
Flexible stand-up pouch 2 0 42 0 0
Jar 6 0 0 17 1
Carton 8 10 0 0 5
Tub 9 13 0 2 3
Skinpack 25 1 3 0 0
Flexible sachet 5 0 3 0 0
Number of product launches, by category - Storage Type
Attribute Processed fish/
seafood products
Meals and
meal centers
Pet food Savoury spreads Snacks
Shelf stable 113 38 106 19 4
Frozen 99 23 0 0 16
Chilled 58 47 0 9 8
Number of product launches, by category - Top Stores
Attribute Processed fish/ seafood products Meals and meal centers Pet food Savoury spreads Snacks
Supermarket 105 46 32 9 11
Mass merchandise/hypermarket 103 37 15 11 8
Department store 46 19 50 5 4
Internet/mail order 12 6 9 2 4
Specialist retailer 2 0 0 1 0

Source: Mintel, 2018

 

Examples of new products

Clams with Marinara Sauce and Olive Oil

Pescatrade Almejas con Salsa Marinera y Aceite de Oliva (Clams with Marinara Sauce and Olive oil) is described as the easiest and quickest way of eating fish. This gluten-free product is microwavable, made with natural ingredients, and can be heated and ready in three and a half minutes. It retails in a 250g pack featuring preparation instructions.

Company Gemas del Mar
Brand Pescatrade
Category Processed Fish, Meat & Egg Products
Country Spain
Date Published Feb 2018
Launch Type New Variety/Range Extension
Price in US Dollars 4.89
Rice with Baby Octopus

El Corte Inglés Club del Gourmet Arroz con Pulpitos (Rice with Baby Octopus) is now available. This product has been cooked over a low heat, and has been made with rice from Delta del Ebro. It retails in an 890g pack with 190g of rice and 700g of terrine. The pack contains two to three portions and features preparation instructions.

Company El Corte Inglés
Brand El Corte Inglés Club del Gourmet
Category Meals & Meal Centers
Country Spain
Date Published Feb 2018
Launch Type New Product
Price in US Dollars 13.53
Crunchy Breaded Cod

Maremundi Pescada Panada Crocanti (Crunchy Breaded Cod) is now available. The product features Star Wars movie graphics and shapes, has been enriched with vitamins and minerals, and cooks in 14-15 minutes in a oven or in five to seven in a pan. It retails in a 300g pack, containing six units and featuring the MSC logo.

Record ID 5434201
Company Fandicosta
Brand Maremundi
Category Processed Fish, Meat & Egg Products
Country Portugal
Date Published Feb 2018
Launch Type New Variety/Range Extension
Price in US Dollars 4.96
Crab Spread

Hacendado Untapán de Cangrejo (crab spread) is said to be ready to prepare toasted sandwiches and canapés. The gluten-free product retails in a 250g pack.

Company Mercadona
Brand Hacendado
Category Savoury Spreads
Country Spain
Date Published Jan 2018
Launch Type New Packaging
Price in US Dollars 1.83
Tuna Tartare

Selectium Chef Tartar de Atún (Tuna Tartare) is now available. This gluten-free product has been made with extra virgin olive oil, can be defrosted and eaten, and retails in a pack containing two 90g units and featuring the Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube logos, as well as recipe suggestions.

Company Selectium Chef
Brand Selectium Chef
Category Processed Fish, Meat & Egg Products
Country Spain
Date Published Feb 2018
Launch Type New Product
Price in US Dollars 7.44
Piquillo Peppers Stuffed with Spider Crab

Deluxe Pimientos Piquillo Rellenos de Txanguro (piquillo peppers stuffed with spider crab) are new to the range. This product retails in a 260g pack.

Company Lidl
Brand Deluxe
Category Snacks
Country Spain
Import Status Not imported
Date Published Jan 2018
Launch Type New Variety/Range Extension
Price in US Dollars 3.55
Razor Clams with Garlic and Sea Spaghetti

Porto-Muiños Navaja al Ajillo con Espagueti de Mar (Razor Clams with Garlic and Sea Spaghetti) are new to the range. These organic clams have been hand caught and selected, and retail in a 90g pack, containing between six and eight pieces and featuring Galician Organic Agriculture logo.

Company Porto Muiños
Brand Porto Muiños
Category Processed Fish, Meat & Egg Products
Country Spain
Import Status Not imported
Date Published Dec 2017
Launch Type New Variety/Range Extension
Price in US Dollars 7.03
Yellow Fin Tuna Belly in Olive Oil

Echebastar Ventresca de Atún Claro en Aceite de Oliva (Yellow Fin Tuna Belly in Olive Oil) is now available. The product is said to be hand-made, 100% healthy, and has been quick-frozen at -60°C. It retails in a 115g pack with 75g drained weight, and featuring the Dolphin Safe logo.

Company Echebastar Fleet
Brand Echebastar
Category Processed Fish, Meat & Egg Products
Country Spain
Date Published Oct 2017
Launch Type New Variety/Range Extension
Price in US Dollars 5.60
Tuna Fillet in a Unique Herbs Dream

Tastin Filete de Atum à Algarvia is now available. This product is a source of Omega-3 fatty acids and is said to be manually handled. It retails in a 120g pack bearing the Dolphin Safe logo and a QR code.

Company IMCB
Brand Tastin
Category Processed Fish, Meat & Egg Products
Country Portugal
Date Published Feb 2017
Launch Type New Product
Price in US Dollars 2.12
Complete Pet Food with Salmon and Rice for Small Bred Dogs

Dia AS Selection Alimento Completo para Perros de Raza Pequeña con Fresh Salmon y Arroz (Complete Pet Food with Fresh Salmon and Rice for Small Bred Dogs) is now available. The veterinarian made product contains fresh salmon, which is a very tasty ingredient for dogs with the finest taste and which contains high quantities of omega-3. This pet food is also rich in vitamin E and selenium which are cellular antioxidants that support the immune system. It is rich in rice, a high tolerance cereal which encourages easy digestion and supports intestinal digestion with brewer's yeast which helps to regulate the balance of intestinal flora and is high energy with a high fat content. This crunchy kibble with vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus helps develop strong teeth and bones, and contains salmon oil which provides omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that are for a smooth and shiny coat, and salmon oil is a source of DHA which is for good development of the nervous system and vision care. It retails in a 800g pack.

Company Dia
Brand Dia AS Selection
Category Pet Food
Country Spain
Date Published Sep 2017
Launch Type New Product
Price in US Dollars 17.47

Conclusion

Spain and Portugal are among the biggest consumers of fish and seafood in the world and import a significant proportion of what they consume. Imports from Canada have increased significantly since 2014 at a compound annual growth rate of 25% for Spain and 28% for Portugal. However, there is still room for growth, especially with the elimination of tariffs under the Canadia-Europe Trade Agreement (CETA).

As is the case in other Mediterranean nations, Spanish and Portuguese people consume a very diverse supply of fish and seafood and tend to prefer fresh over processed. Nonetheless, processed fish and seafood products are gaining in popularity, due to new lifestyles and trends such as convenience. For example, frozen or boneless products offer ease of preparation which is attractive to the younger segments of the population.

For more information

International Trade Commissioners can provide Canadian industry with on-the-ground expertise regarding market potential, current conditions and local business contacts, and are an excellent point of contact for export advice.

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For more information on Seafood Expo Global 2018 in Belgium, please contact:

Ben Berry, Deputy Director
Trade Show Strategy and Delivery
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
ben.berry@canada.ca

Resources

Sector Trend Analysis - Fish and seafood trends in Spain and Portugal

Global Analysis Report

Prepared by: Josique Lorenzo, Market Analyst

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (2018).

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