Market Opportunity - China

In 2015, China's agri-food and seafood imports were valued at $148.5 billion representing an increase at a compound annual growth rate of 10.4% from 2013 and 2015.

Video transcript

[Chinese themed music starts]

[The video opens with a shot of Chinese architecture. A red bar slides in from the left and the title of the video appears on the bar.]

Text on screen: Canadian Agri-Food Trade Commissioners

[The title disappears and is replaced by new text. The red bar remains.]

Text on screen: Market Opportunity China

[The image of Chinese architecture, the text and the red bar disappears. The shot changes to that of a world map. The camera moves right until it stops on China.]

[The shot changes to show Canadian Agri-Food Trade Commissioner, Henry Deng. He is standing against a white background and looking slightly off camera.]

Henry Deng: China is a big country.

[The shot changes to an aerial view of a highly populated area marked with tall residential skyscrapers.]

It has a population…

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

…of 1.3 billion.

[The shot changes to show a view of Shanghai.]

The economic growth…

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

…is very stable.

[The shot changes to an animation of the planet indicating international trade between countries.]

And the GDP growth is at the average rate…

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

…of 7 or 7.5% every year…

Text on screen: Henry Deng, Trade Commissioner

[The shot changes to show a modern Chinese city.]

…for about two decades.

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

I'm Henry Deng. I'm from Shanghai. I have been working in the Canadian Consulate General in Shanghai…

[The shot changes to show a modern Chinese city.]

…for 22 years.

[Fade to black.]

[The Chinese themed music fades out.]

[Fade up from black to see an agricultural field area in China.]

[Different Chinese themed music fades in.]

China is the number three largest…

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

…agri-food importing country in the world.

[The shot changes to show an agricultural field area in Canada.]

And Canada is China's number 4 agri-food supplying country…

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

…in the world.

[The shot changes to show Canadian Agri-Food Trade Commissioner, Murray Gwyer. He is standing against a white background and looking slightly off camera.]

Murray Gwyer: Canada and China…

[The shot changes to show an aerial view of a Chinese village.]

…have had a long relationship and at the core of the relationship...

[The shot changes to show a wheat farmer standing in his field inspecting his crop.]

…we've often found agriculture.

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

Text on screen: Murray Gwyer, Trade Commissioner

My name is Murray Gwyer. I'm a Trade Commissioner working in the Canadian embassy in Bejing.

[The shot changes to show an urban, possibly downtown area, of a Chinese city.]

We've got many opportunities across the entire spectrum…

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

…of agriculture and agri-food and seafood products.

[The shot changes to show a field being irrigated at sunset.]

Henry Deng: Canadian products have an excellent market…

[The shot changes to show the inside of a large shopping centre in China. It is filled with people.]

…reputation in the China market.

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

Text on screen: Know the Market

The best opportunity in China is the population and also the desire…

[The shot changes to show a woman watering lettuce in a large commercial greenhouse.]

…for high quality and safe food.

[The shot changes to show a wheat farmer pouring wheat grains from one hand to another.]

Murray Gwyer: We sell wheat that goes into the highest quality bread products in China.

[The shot changes to show three men sitting at a table drinking beer.]

We sell barley that goes into the highest quality beer products in China.

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

We've seen very strong growth in…

[The shot changes to show a lobster fisherman hauling a net onto his boat.]

…seafood markets for lobster…

[The shot changes to show several raw shrimp being tossed on a barbeque.]

…for cold water shrimp…

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

…for Geoduck and for a lot of non-traditional seafood products as well.

[The shot changes to show a man cooking food on a hot surface.]

We're also selling more and more...

[The shot changes to show a beef noodle soup.]

...beef products directly into China.

[The shot changes to show a close up of beef being stewed in a pot.]

We're selling a lot of pork despite the fact that...

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

...China is the world's largest pork producer.

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

Henry Deng: Why do Chinese consumers love to buy pork...

[The shot changes to show hogs in a pen.]

...from Canada?

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

It's because of our food safety.

[The shot changes to show a close up of a scientist working in a lab. They are testing fresh milk.]

Because we have a very high...

[The shot changes to show a close up of small test tubes used in a lab setting.]

...standard...

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

...of food safety.

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

Murray Gwyer: China appreciates...

[The shot changes to show cattle in a field at sunrise.]

...natural products. They appreciate our strengths in terms...

[The shot changes to show a man canoeing on a glacial lake with mountains in the background.]

...of having a clean environment...

[The shot changes to show a person watering a crop in a large outdoor garden.]

...clean water and a general confidence in the product.

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

There's many Chinese importers...

[The shot changes to a close up of cherry blossoms.]

...that were anxious to get cherries because our cherries have some...

[The shot changes to show fresh cherries in a bowl.]

...superior value and qualities.

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

The uptake on our Canadian cherries was enormous...

[The shot changes to show a close up of fresh blueberries.]

...because they people were demanding it. Once we had the cherries in...

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

...we were also then able to make progress...

[The shot changes to show blueberries growing in a field.]

...with blueberries. And that's a reflection of the fact...

[The shot changes to show a mason jar full of fresh blueberries.]

...that the Chinese consumers...

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

...recognize the quality...

[The shot changes to show small paper bags filled with blueberries.]

...of the products from Canada.

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

Henry Deng: If you want to export to the China market...

[The shot changes to show the harbour area of a large, modern city.]

Text on screen: Be Ready For Challenges

..the most important challenge you will have is the international competition.

[The shot changes to show a densely populated area of a Chinese city.]

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

Second, China is not a single, or harmonized market. Sometimes you have a buyer in one place.

[The shot changes to show an older, smaller Chinese city.]

It doesn't mean that product...

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

...will be able to be sold...

[The shot changes to show a rural Chinese village.]

...in different cities in China.

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

Number 3; the China market...

[The shot changes to show a close up of hot peppers and dried beans.]

...a price sensitive market.

[The shot changes back to Henry Deng.]

So price should be another consideration.

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

Murray Gwyer: The Trade Commissioner Service...

[The shot changes to show several tall, modern skyscrapers.]

...provides an invaluable service in supporting the Canadian industry.

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

And one thing that's really positive about China...

[The shot changes to show a very busy area of a Chinese city.]

...is that we've got very broad representation.

[A red banner appears from the left over the image of the Chinese city.]

Text on screen: Consult With Experts

[The shot changes to show a large Chinese city at night.]

We have our embassy in Bejing with agriculture and agri-food specialists...

[The shot changes to show a street level view of the Chinese city at night.]

...working in the Trade Commissioner Service.

[The shot changes to show a colourful time lapse shot of a bustling city at night.]

We also have the consulate generals...

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

...in Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Chongqing.

[The shot changes to show people working at a desk.]

And that's supported by 10 Canadian trade offices...

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

...that are operated by the Canadian Commercial Corporation.

[The shot changes to show people walking down a covered walkway between two large buildings.]

All of whom can provide support...

[The shot changes back to Murray Gwyer.]

...and advice to Canadian companies.

[The shot changes to show Shanghai at night. A red banner appears from the left. Text appears on the banner.]

Text on screen: tradecommisioner.gc.ca

[The text changes.]

Text on screen: Contact Us Today

[The shot changes to the animated Canada wordmark on a white background.]

Text on screen: (c) Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (2016)

[Chinese themed music fades out.]

[Fade to black.]

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