Genetic gains in agronomic and selected end-use quality traits over a century of plant breeding of Canada Western Red Spring wheat.

Hucl, P.J., Briggs, C., Graf, R.J., and Chibbar, R.N. (2015). "Genetic gains in agronomic and selected end-use quality traits over a century of plant breeding of Canada Western Red Spring wheat.", Cereal Chemistry, 92(6), pp. 537-543. doi : 10.1094/CCHEM-02-15-0029-R  Access to full text

Abstract

Canadian Western Red Spring (CWRS) market class is the predominant type of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in Canada since the turn of the 20th century. Wheat cultivars ranging from cv. Red Fife to cv. Superb were field tested in a series of 24 replicated trials spanning 19 years in central Saskatchewan, Canada. The objective of this study was to measure the rate of cultivar improvement in light of relatively narrow end-use quality definitions for the CWRS market class. Regression of cultivar trait means on year of cultivar registration was used to assess the rate of change in yield, productivity traits, and end-use quality parameters. Yield levels were estimated to be increasing at a rate of approximately 15 kg/ha per year in 1970 and 23 kg/ha per year in 1995. Days to spike emergence and plant height decreased over time. Kernel weight, grain protein concentration, SDS sedimentation volume, farinograph absorption, and dough development time increased over time, whereas farinograph mixing tolerance index and yellow pigment concentration decreased. The results show that improvement in key agronomic and end-use traits has been achieved in CWRS wheat.

Date modified: