Adaptability and quality of winter pea and lentil in Alberta.

Strydhorst, S.M., Olson, M., Vasanthan, T., McPhee, K., McKenzie, R.H., Henriquez, B., Tieulie, J., Middleton, A.B., Dunn, R., Pfiffner, P.G., Coles, K., Bandara, M.S., Kruger, A., Bowness, R.T., Bing, D.-J., and Beauchesne, D. (2015). "Adaptability and quality of winter pea and lentil in Alberta.", Agronomy Journal, 107(6), pp. 2431-2448. doi : 10.2134/agronj15-0092  Access to full text

Abstract

It is unknown if winter pea (Pisum sativum L.) and winter lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) are feasible cropping options in Alberta. Field experiments were conducted at six locations in southern and central Alberta, Canada, between 2008 and 2012, to determine the adaptability of winter pea and lentil. Two winter pea cultivars, Specter and Windham, and one winter lentil cultivar, Morton, were seeded at three fall planting dates and three seeding rates. Spring cultivars were grown for comparison. In southern Alberta, winter pea and lentil yielded up to 39% more than spring types. The highest winter pea yield was achieved when planting was completed during the first 3 wk of September. The highest winter lentil yield was achieved when planting was completed in the second and third weeks of September. Seeding rate had little or no impact on yield; therefore, winter pea should be seeded at 75 plants m–2 and winter lentil at 110 plants m–2. Seed was analyzed to compare constituent parameters. There were minor differences in the composition of winter and spring pulses. Windham had lower starch but higher resistant starch, protein, crude fat, and ash content compared with spring pea cultivars. Specter had higher resistant starch but was similar to Cutlass for all other parameters. Morton had a higher starch content than CDC Redberry; however, starch quality was similar. Winter pulses have potential to create new and profitable opportunities for growers in the Bow Island and Lethbridge areas of southern Alberta.

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