Evolutionary Ecology of Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) and Diadegma insulare (Cresson) in North America: A Review.

Munir, S., Dosdall, L.M., and O'Donovan, J.T. (2014). "Evolutionary Ecology of Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) and Diadegma insulare (Cresson) in North America: A Review.", Annual Research & Review in Biology, 5(3), pp. 189-206. doi : 10.9734/ARRB/2015/11834  Access to full text

Abstract

The diamondback moth (DBM), Plutellai xylostella (L.), is recognized as a widely distributed destructive insect pest of Brassicaceae. The frequency and severity of P. xylostella outbreaks has increased in recent years, due to climate changes, high production of host plants (vegetable and oilseed Brassica crops), genetic flexibility of the pest that enables it to develop resistance to almost all known insecticides and establish quickly and easily in new environment. All life stages of P. xylostella are attacked by natural enemies but Diadegma insulare (Cresson) is one of the principal, effective and efficient larval parasitoids in North America. In this review, we synthesize published information on the primary aspects of P. xylostella origin, dispersal, migration, biology, and host plants and mainly focus on evolutionary ecology of bitrophic and tritrophic interactions among P. xylostella, its host plants and natural enemies.

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