Propagation methods affect fruit morphology and antioxidant properties but maintain clonal fidelity in lowbush blueberry.

Goyali, J.C., Igamberdiev, A.U., and Debnath, S.C. (2015). "Propagation methods affect fruit morphology and antioxidant properties but maintain clonal fidelity in lowbush blueberry.", HortScience, 50(6), pp. 888-896.

Abstract

The berry morphology (size and weight), phytochemical content (polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins), and antioxidant activity of lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) wild clone QB 9C and cultivar Fundy, propagated by tissue culture (TC) and softwood cutting (SC), were studied over two growing seasons to evaluate the effect of propagation methods on fruit yield and the content of antioxidant metabolites. Number of flower clusters, number of berries and berry weight per plant, diameter and weight of individual berry were higher in SC plants than those of TC plants. Significant interaction between genotypes and propagation methods were observed for total phenolic and flavonoid content of fruits. Berries from TC plants contained more polyphenols and flavonoids than those of SC plants. Twenty microsatellite markers were used to assess the clonal fidelity of TC regenerants and SC plants. The identical monomorphic amplification profiles within the TC plants of each genotype confirmed the clonal fidelity of micropropagated blueberry plants. These results indicate that propagation methods affected the morphology and antioxidant metabolites but maintained trueness-to-type genetic makeup in blueberry.

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