Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation protects Miscanthus×giganteus against trace element toxicity in a highly metal-contaminated site.

Firmin, S., Labidi, S., Fontaine, J., Laruelle, F., Tisserant, B., Nsanganwimana, F., Pourrut, B., Dalpé, Y., Grandmougin, A., Douay, F., Shirali, P., Verdin, A., and Lounès-Hadj Sharaoui, A. (2015). "Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation protects Miscanthus×giganteus against trace element toxicity in a highly metal-contaminated site.", Science of the Total Environment, 527-528, pp. 91-99. doi : 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.04.116  Access to full text

Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF)-assisted phytoremediation could constitute an ecological and economic method in polluted soil rehabilitation programs. The aim of this work was to characterize the trace element (TE) phytoremediation potential of mycorrhizal Miscanthus × giganteus. To understand the mechanisms involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis tolerance to TE toxicity, the fatty acid compositions and several stress oxidative biomarkers were compared in the roots and leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus cultivated under field conditions in either TE-contaminated or control soils. TEs were accumulated in greater amounts in roots, but the leaves were the organ most affected by TE contamination and were characterized by a strong decrease in fatty acid contents. TE-induced oxidative stress in leaves was confirmed by an increase in the lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA). TE contamination decreased the GSSG/GSH ratio in the leaves of exposed plants, while peroxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in leaves and in whole plants, respectively. AMF inoculation also increased root colonization in the presence of TE contamination. The mycorrhizal colonization determined a decrease in SOD activity in the whole plant and PO activities in leaves and induced a significant increase in the fatty acid content in leaves and a decrease in MDA formation in whole plants. These results suggested that mycorrhization is able to confer protection against oxidative stress induced by soil pollution. Our findings suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation could be used as a bioaugmentation technique, facilitating Miscanthus cultivation on highly TE-contaminated soil.

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