Chromosome location and allele-specific PCR markers for marker-assisted selection of the oat crown rust resistance gene Pc91.

Gnanesh, B.N., Mitchell Fetch, J.W., Menzies, J.G., Beattie, A.D., Eckstein, P.E., and McCartney, C.A. (2013). "Chromosome location and allele-specific PCR markers for marker-assisted selection of the oat crown rust resistance gene Pc91.", Molecular Breeding, 32(3), pp. 679-686. doi : 10.1007/s11032-013-9900-6  Access to full text

Abstract

Race-specific seedling resistance genes are the primary means of controlling crown rust of oat caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks in Canada. Pc91 is a seedling crown rust resistance gene that is highly effective against the current crown rust population in North America. A number of race-specific resistance genes have been mapped and markers that are closely linked to them have been identified. However, the use of these markers in oat breeding has been limited by the economics of marker-assisted selection (MAS). A crucial step in the successful application of MAS in breeding programs is the development of inexpensive and easy-to-use molecular markers. The primary objective of this study was to develop co-dominant KBioscience competitive allele-specific PCR (KASP) markers linked to Pc91 for deployment in high-throughput MAS in oat breeding programs. The allele-specific marker showed consistent diagnostic polymorphism between the selected 16 North American oat breeding lines. The developed co-dominant marker was also validated on three F2 populations (AC Morgan × Stainless; SW Betania × Stainless; AC Morgan × CDC Morrison) and one recombinant inbred line population (CDC Sol-Fi × HiFi) segregating for Pc91 using KASP genotyping technology. We recommend the simple, low-cost marker as a powerful tool for pyramiding Pc91 with other effective crown rust resistance loci into a single line. The mapping results indicate that crown rust resistance gene Pc91 resides on the translocated oat chromosome 7C-17A.

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