Determinants of plasma triglyceride levels in a multiethnic working class Caribbean population: Effect of ethnicity, diet and obesity.

Ramdath, D.D., Singh, S., Hilaire, D., and Nayak, B.S. (2013). "Determinants of plasma triglyceride levels in a multiethnic working class Caribbean population: Effect of ethnicity, diet and obesity.", Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, 7(4), pp. 198-201. doi : 10.1016/j.dsx.2013.10.019  Access to full text

Abstract

Aims: Objective of the study is to identify the predictors of plasma triglycerides. Materials and methods: A stratified random sample of university staff categories underwent measurements of anthropometry, blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipids, CRP and homocysteine. Dietary intakes were assessed using duplicate 24 h recalls. HOMA-IR was calculated. Stepwise, multivariate regression analysis was performed with TAG as the dependent variable. Results: The sample (n = 251) was 55% females with a mean age of 44.9 ± 9.7 years. African ancestry comprised 43%, followed South Asian 30% and mixed ethnicity 27%. Prevalence of obesity was 19.4%, insulin resistance 22.7% and metabolic syndrome 21.6%. Males had significantly higher (n < 0.01) triglycerides and VLDL and lower HDL than females. Africans had significantly lower triglycerides and cholesterol than South Asians and Mix. Triglycerides were significantly (n < 0.01) correlated with glucose, cholesterol, insulin, CRP, systolic, diastolic blood pressure, WC, BMI, age and components of MS. Glucose, cholesterol, insulin and total energy intake predicted TAG, to varying extents, in all participants (R2 = 45.1%), males (R2 = 40.3%), females (R2 = 56.0%), Africans (R2 = 35.0%), TSA (R2 = 31.5%) and mix (R2 = 51.0%). Conclusions: Africans have lower triglycerides and cholesterol than South Asians and mix. Major predictors of triglycerides were fasting glucose and cholesterol independent of gender and ethnicity.

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