‘Honeycrisp’ apple leaf and fruit nutrient concentration is affected by rootstock during establishment.

Neilsen, G.H. and Hampson, C.R. (2014). "‘Honeycrisp’ apple leaf and fruit nutrient concentration is affected by rootstock during establishment.", Journal of the American Pomological Society, 68(4), pp. 178-189.

Abstract

A trial involving 31 dwarfing and semi-dwarfing apple [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.] rootstocks from Russia, USA and Germany, with ‘Honeycrisp’ as the scion, was established in 2010 in Summerland, B.C., Canada, as part of a larger experiment organized by the USDA NC-140 rootstock research group. Leaf and fruit nutrient concentrations were affected by rootstock during the critical, first three years of establishment under irrigated conditions. Trees exhibited a range of vigor and initial yield. Few problems were found in achieving adequate leaf N, B and Cu regardless of rootstock, whereas leaf Zn, P, Mg and fruit Ca often did not achieve sufficiency. Rootstocks were identified with superior and inferior abilities to accumulate individual nutrients, but only B.70-6-8 (P, Mn and K) and B.7-3-150 (P, K) were superior for more than a single nutrient. The ability to accumulate a range of key plant nutrients was not well-correlated with initial tree performance, with the exception of a close association between leaf P and initial tree vigor. There also was an apparent antagonism between P and fruit Ca concentration of the first crop.

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