First report of bumblebee (Bombus impatiens Cresson) transmission of Pepino mosaic virus between tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and perennial climbing nightshade (Solanum dulcamara L.).

Stobbs, L.W. and Greig, N. (2014). "First report of bumblebee (Bombus impatiens Cresson) transmission of Pepino mosaic virus between tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and perennial climbing nightshade (Solanum dulcamara L.).", Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, 36(4), pp. 529-533. doi : 10.1080/07060661.2014.954625  Access to full text

Abstract

Greenhouse trials demonstrated the ability of bumblebees (Bombus impatiens Cresson) to transmit Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) from infected tomato plants to perennial climbing nightshade (Solanum dulcamara L) in 2 of 3 trials (5.1% and 5.6% frequency, respectively). The efficiency of transmission was lower than that between tomato plants in previous studies (80%). Low rates of transmission were also seen in bee transmission from nightshade plants back to tomato (6.3%, 3.7% and 2.8%), and between nightshade plants (8.3% and 2.8%). Nightshade was easily infected by mechanical inoculation in controls. Bumblebees used by growers to pollinate tomatoes can move freely in and out of the production houses, and bees carrying virus inoculum from infected greenhouse tomatoes could establish and spread PepMV in nearby climbing nightshade populations. This overwintering reservoir could allow for ongoing virus introduction from the field through pollinating bees back into tomato production houses seasonally. The virus could also spread from infected climbing nightshade into tomato field plantings through similar bee activity.

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