Effects of greenhouse intensive cultivation and organic amendments on greenhouse gas emission according to a soil incubation study.

Yang, G.-R., Hao, X., Li, C.L., and Li, Y.-M. (2015). "Effects of greenhouse intensive cultivation and organic amendments on greenhouse gas emission according to a soil incubation study.", Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science, 61(1), pp. 89-103. doi : 10.1080/03650340.2014.922177  Access to full text

Abstract

Soil cultivation changes and usage of agricultural wastes can have profound impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission from soil. In this study, the effects of soil cultivation and organic amendment on GHG emission were investigated using aerobic incubation. Surface soil (0–20 cm) from (1) rice–legume consecutive rotation (Rice) and (2) recently (<3 years) converted from rice field to plastic-covered intensive vegetable and flower production (VegC) were collected in Kunming, P.R. China. Rose (Rosa rugosa Thunb.) residues and cattle manure were applied at 5% by weight. Results indicated that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by soil cultivation, organic amendment, incubation time and their interaction (p <0.05). Applying cattle manure increased, while rose residue decreased, cumulative N2O emissions from soil (84 days). Rose residue application significantly increased cumulative CO2 emissions with peak values of 6371 (Rice) and 7481 mg kg1 (VegC), followed by cattle manure addition figure of 2265 (VegC) and 3581 mg kg1 (Rice). Both were significantly higher (p <0.05) than the un-amended Control at 709 (VegC) and 904 mg kg1 (Rice). Our study demonstrates that a low C/N ratio in cattle manure is better than a high C/N ratio in rose residue in regard to reducing the global warming potential of agricultural soil.

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