Pyrosequencing reveals how pulses influence rhizobacterial communities with feedback on wheat growth in the semiarid Prairie.

Yang, C., Hamel, C., Gan, Y.T., and Vujanovic, V. (2013). "Pyrosequencing reveals how pulses influence rhizobacterial communities with feedback on wheat growth in the semiarid Prairie.", Plant and Soil, 367(1-2), pp. 493-505. doi : 10.1007/s11104-012-1485-z  Access to full text

Abstract

Background and Aims Evidence shows that plants modify their microbial environment leading to the “crop rotation effect”, but little is known about the changes in rhizobacterial community structure and functionality associated with beneficial rotation effects. Methods Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 454 GS FLX amplicon pyrosequencing were used to describe the composition of the rhizobacterial community evolving under the influence of pea, a growth promoting rotation crop, and the influence of three genotypes of chickpea, a plant known as an inferior rotation crop. The growth promoting properties of these rhizobacterial communities were tested on wheat in greenhouse assays. Results The rhizobacterial communities selected by pea and the chickpea CDC Luna in 2008, a wet year, promoted durum wheat growth, but those selected by CDC Vanguard or CDC Frontier had no growth-promoting effect. In 2009, a dry year, the influence of plants was mitigated, indicated that moisture availability is a major driver of soil bacterial community dynamics. Conclusion The effect of pulse crops on soil biological quality varies with the crop species and genotypes, and certain chickpea genotypes may induce positive rotation effects on wheat. The strength of a rotation effect on soil biological quality is modulated by the abundance of precipitation.

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