Genetic diversity of the golden potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis and determination of the origin of populations in Quebec, Canada.

Boucher, A.C., Mimee, B., Montarry, J., Bardou-Valette, S., Bélair, G., Moffett, P., and Grenier, É. (2013). "Genetic diversity of the golden potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis and determination of the origin of populations in Quebec, Canada.", Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 69(1), pp. 75-82. doi : 10.1016/j.ympev.2013.05.020  Access to full text

Abstract

The golden cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis), native to South America, has been introduced in many parts of the world, including Europe and North America. Recently, it was found for the first time in the province of Quebec, Canada in the locality of St. Amable near Montreal. To date, very few studies have examined the population genetics of this pest. Consequently, there is a lack of knowledge about the genetic structure and evolution of this nematode. In this study, twelve new microsatellite markers were developed in order to explore these questions. These markers were used to genotype fifteen populations originating from different regions of the world, including five from Canada. Within populations, the highest genetic diversity was consistently observed in the populations from Bolivia, the postulated region of origin of the golden nematode, and the lowest in populations from British Columbia (Canada) and New York (USA). The two Quebec populations were very similar to each other and to the population found in Newfoundland, but surprisingly, they were significantly different from three other North American populations including those from New York and British Columbia. Based on our results, we conclude that the golden cyst nematode has been introduced in North America at least twice from distinct regions of the world.

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