Applying lessons from the United States in developing Canada's forest inventory: A review.

Mirck, J. and Mabee, W.E. (2013). "Applying lessons from the United States in developing Canada's forest inventory: A review.", Journal of Forestry, 111(1), pp. 67-74. doi : 10.5849/jof.11-088  Access to full text

Abstract

Canada and the United States have each introduced continuous forest inventory approaches over the past 10 years. A series of seven criteria are proposed to assess the ability of these inventories to provide high precision, useful data across multiple jurisdictions at reasonable cost. The Canadian inventory is undertaken by both federal and provincial agencies and measured on a 10-year cycle compared with a 5-year cycle used in the United States. Sampling intensity in the United States is significantly higher than in Canada. The accessibility of US data via the Web was much greater than in Canada, because of the wider array of tools and report options available. The Canadian system, although less expensive, has sampled considerably fewer trees, and that impacts data precision and resolution. Accessibility of Canadian data is deficient compared with the US system. The Canadian inventory should consider increasing sampling and improving access to data to match US development.

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