Will the convention on biological diversity put an end to biological control?

van Lenteren, J.C., Cock, M.J.W., Brodeur, J., Barratt, B.I.P., Bigler, F., Bolckmans, K., Mason, P.G., Haas, F., and Parra, J.R.P. (2011). "Will the convention on biological diversity put an end to biological control?", Revista Brasileira de entomologia, 55(1), pp. 1-5. doi : 10.1590/s0085-56262011000100001  Access to full text

Abstract

Will the Convention on Biological Diversity put an end to biological control? Under the Convention on Biological Diversity countries have sovereign rights over their genetic resources. Agreements governing the access to these resources and the sharing of the benefits arising from their use need to be established between involved parties. This also applies to species collected for potential use in biological control. Recent applications of access and benefit sharing principles have already made it difficult or impossible to collect and export natural enemies for biological control research in several countries. If such an approach is widely applied it would impede this very successful and environmentally safe pest management method based on the use of biological diversity. The International Organization for Biological Control of Noxious Animals and Plants has, therefore, created the “Commission on Biological Control and Access and Benefit Sharing”. This commission is carrying out national and international activities to make clear how a benefit sharing regime might seriously frustrate the future of biological control. In addition, the IOBC Commission members published information on current regulations and perceptions concerning exploration for natural enemies and drafted some 30 case studies selected to illustrate a variety of points relevant to access and benefit sharing. In this article, we summarize our concern about the effects of access and benefit sharing systems on the future of biological control.

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