Spring emergence of Canadian Delia radicum and synchronization with its natural enemy, Aleochara bilineata.

Andreassen, L.D., Kuhlmann, U., Whistlecraft, J.W., Soroka, J.J., Mason, P.G., Akinremi, O.O., and Holliday, N.J. (2010). "Spring emergence of Canadian Delia radicum and synchronization with its natural enemy, Aleochara bilineata.", Canadian Entomologist, 142(3), pp. 234-249. doi : 10.4039/n09-060  Access to full text

Abstract

To characterize time of spring emergence following post-diapause development, Delia radicum (L.) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) from Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and southwestern Ontario were collected in fall, maintained over winter at 1 °C, then transferred to higher constant temperatures until adult emergence. At each location there were “early” and “late” phenotypes. Truncated normal models of temperature dependency of development rate were fitted for each phenotype from each location. We provide the first evidence of geographic variation in the criteria separating these phenotypes. Separation criteria and models for early and late phenotypes at the two prairie locations, approximately 700 km apart, were indistinguishable, but differed from those for Ontario. Prairie phenotypes developed more slowly than Ontario phenotypes, and more prairie individuals were of the late phenotype. Poor synchronization of spring emergence could impair predation of D. radicum eggs by adult Aleochara bilineata Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). Aleochara bilineata from Manitoba were reared and development rates modelled as for D. radicum. Models of development rates for the two species, when combined with simulated soil temperatures for two prairie locations, suggest that emergence of adult A. bilineata is well synchronized with availability of D. radicum eggs in prairie canola.

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