2017–18 Departmental Plan

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International Standard Serial Number: 2371-736X

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P.,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Minister's Message

Honourable Lawrence MacAulay

I’m pleased to present to Parliament and Canadians the 2017–18 Departmental Plan for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. This report outlines what we do and the results we are trying to achieve during the coming year.

To improve reporting to Canadians, we are introducing a new, simplified report to replace the Report on Plans and Priorities. The title of the report has been changed to reflect its purpose: to communicate our annual performance goals and the financial and human resources forecast to deliver those results. The report has also been restructured to tell a clearer, more straightforward and balanced story of the actual results we are trying to achieve, while continuing to provide transparency on how tax payers’ dollars will be spent. We describe our programs and services for Canadians, our priorities for 2017–18, and how our work will fulfill our departmental mandate commitments and the government’s priorities.

The Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector is a powerful driver of Canada’s economy, contributing over $100 billion to our gross domestic product and over $60 billion in exports. It is the single largest manufacturing employer of any sector. Canada’s hardworking farmers and food processors put high-quality, healthy food on tables around the world each and every day.

To help keep this vibrant industry strong and growing, the Prime Minister has identified a number of key priorities, including the next policy framework for agriculture, trade, transportation, science and innovation, climate change, a national food policy, and a value-added food processing fund. We will work with industry, the provinces and territories and colleagues, to deliver on these priorities, while ensuring the views of Canadians, including youth, women, indigenous Canadians, and persons with disabilities, are reflected.

To drive an innovative and competitive agriculture and food sector that can grow the economy and create jobs, over the coming year, I will continue to work with the provinces and territories and industry to complete the next agricultural policy framework, to replace Growing Forward 2 in 2018. This is Canada’s flagship agricultural policy that defines and drives the future of Canada’s agriculture and food sector. We continue to work with stakeholders to ensure the next framework delivers for the industry and Canada.

Trade is critical for an industry that exports about half of the value of its production. Canada’s agriculture and food exports hit a new record in 2015. Continuous success will depend on opening new markets for Canadian food around the world, while ensuring foreign trade-related measures are based on science and consistent with international trade rules. Through trade missions, we will target key growth areas such as Asia, Europe – and our largest trading partner, the United States.

Trade depends on a strong transportation system. We will continue to work with the industry to strengthen Canada’s rail system to ensure an efficient rail system that is prepared to meet future growth.

Because cutting-edge innovation is vital to trade, we will continue to invest in discovery science, developing new tools and technologies that will help keep Canada out in front.

Science also helps the Canadian agriculture sector take action on climate change. Our continuing investments in science will help farmers reduce their environmental footprint and protect soil and water resources, while increasing their production and returns.

Finally, we will work with the industry and Canadians to develop a national food policy that promotes high-quality food, produced by Canadian farmers, for the tables of families across the country and around the world.

As Canada celebrates 150 years of nationhood, the future of Canada’s agriculture and agri-food industry is full of opportunity. Demand for food continues to grow, and Canada’s farmers and food processors have the capacity to meet that demand, with productive, innovative, sustainable operations.

We have an ambitious agenda. But I know that by collaborating with my dedicated colleagues in the Government, Department and portfolios, as well as the provinces, territories, industry and all Canadians, we will help Canada’s agriculture and food industry continue to innovate, grow the economy, and feed the world.

Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P.,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Celebrating 150 years of agriculture

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will not only be celebrating Canada's sesquicentennial, but also 150 years as a department and the appointment of its first minister. The Department will host activities and events across the country for both the general public and employees – from videos, to open houses and commemorative tree plantings at research centres.

Plans at a glance

The Department has identified key priorities for 2017–18 that align with the commitments laid out in the Prime Minister's mandate letter to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

Develop a new multi-year agricultural policy framework

Growing Forward 2, a five-year policy framework that sets the foundation for federal-provincial-territorial programs and services, is set to expire March 31, 2018. Building on the lessons of past frameworks, the next framework will further enhance policy and regulatory coherence and set clear federal-provincial-territorial objectives across the country to drive the sustainable growth, innovation and competitiveness of the sector.

Activities that will support the achievement of results include: negotiating and signing a new Multilateral Framework Agreement with provincial and territorial governments; working with producers and other governments to ensure that the next suite of Business Risk Management programs continue to be comprehensive in scope and meet the needs of producers; negotiating and concluding bilateral agreements with provincial and territorial governments; and, developing and announcing federal and cost-shared programming.

Advance and promote Canada’s agricultural trade interests and support the Government of Canada’s trade agenda

Improving domestic and international market access conditions and advocating for a predictable and stable trade environment will help the sector increase its global competitiveness and exports.

Activities that will support the achievement of results include: assisting the sector in improving its competitiveness by taking advantage of market opportunities; maintaining and improving market access; advancing and defending Canada’s agricultural interests bilaterally and multilaterally; and, advocating for the adoption of predictable and science-based rules and regulations.

Invest in agricultural research to support discovery science and innovation in the sector, including in clean and sustainable technologies and processes

Supporting research, development and knowledge transfer activities will help accelerate the pace of innovation to enhance sector sustainability, and improve sector productivity and profitability.

Activities that will support the achievement of results include: contributing to agriculture and agri-food relevant science and innovation research; and, improving the coordination of research projects and activities with other government departments on clean technology projects.

Work with stakeholders to support science and innovation investments to enhance sector resiliency to a changing climate

Supporting research and development activities will enhance the ability of the sector to adapt to environmental challenges, including water and soil conservation and development issues.

The activities that will support the achievement of results include enhancing science investments related to climate change and environmental sustainability.

Develop a national food policy that promotes healthy living and safe food

A national food policy will establish a more collaborative and integrated approach to food-related issues towards increasing food security, improving healthy eating, promoting environmental stewardship within the food system, and supporting sustainable growth of the agriculture and food sector.

Activities that will support the achievement of results include developing a national food policy through engagement with other federal departments and consultations with provincial and territorial governments, the sector, key stakeholders and Canadians.

Advance an approach to strengthen Canada’s food processing industry

The food processing sector is key to the Canadian economy. Targeted actions to capture market opportunities and address challenges will support the growth of this sector.

Activities that will support the achievement of results include: consulting stakeholders to advance sector priorities; developing targeted research initiatives to support innovative new products and processes; and, supporting implementation of market development strategies to enhance competitiveness domestically and in international markets.

Support the implementation of the Government of Canada’s transportation agenda

The implementation of the Government of Canada's transportation agenda, which is a strategic plan to strengthen Canada's transportation system for the next 20 to 30 years, will further improve the reliability and efficiency of transportation systems and enhance supply chain transparency while ensuring that Canadian farmers can effectively get their products to markets.

Activities that will support the achievement of results include: supporting the implementation of the Government of Canada's transportation agenda, along with the new rail freight framework; supporting investments in transportation infrastructure; and, renewing the Grain Monitoring Program.

For more information on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's plans, priorities and the planned results, see the "Planned results" section of this report.

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food was created in 1868 – one year after Confederation – because of the importance of agriculture to the economic, social and cultural development of Canada. Today, the Department helps create the conditions for the long-term profitability, sustainability and adaptability of the Canadian agricultural sector. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada supports the sector through initiatives that promote innovation and competitiveness, and that proactively manage risk. The Department's goal is to position agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product industries to realize their full potential by seizing new opportunities in the growing domestic and global marketplace.

July 1, 1867, the year of Confederation, was when the agriculture portfolio was first established and its first minister, Jean-Charles Chapais, appointed by an Order-in-Council. 2017 celebrates 150 years since this milestone.

Our Vision

Driving innovation and ingenuity to build a world leading agricultural and food economy for the benefit of all Canadians.

Our Mission

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides leadership in the growth and development of a competitive, innovative and sustainable Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector.

Mandate and role

The Department supports the sector from the farmer to the consumer, from the farm to global markets, through all phases of producing, processing and marketing of farm, food and agri-based products. Agriculture is a shared jurisdiction in Canada, and the Department works closely with provincial and territorial governments in the development and delivery of policies, programs and services.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's mandate is based upon the Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Act. The Minister is also responsible for the administration of several other Acts such as the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act.

The Department is responsible for ensuring collaboration with its portfolio partners and agencies which are also involved in regulating and supporting Canadian agriculture, including the Farm Products Council of Canada. The Department also includes the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency, a special operating agency that regulates and supervises pari-mutuel betting on horse racing at racetracks across Canada. Descriptions of the portfolio partners and agencies, including their relationship to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, can be found in the "Planned results" section of this report.

While the Canadian Food Inspection Agency reports to the Minister of Health, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's non-food safety activities, including economic and trade issues, consumer protection, as well as animal health and plant protection work.

For more general information about the Department, see the "Supplementary information" section of this report. For more information on the Department's mandate letter commitments, see the Minister's mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Experimentation at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Through the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program, the Department has experimented with supporting Western producers' access to an insurance tool which protects against unforeseen price declines. Livestock producers, rather than governments, pay the full premium when purchasing insurance. Federal funding supports a portion of the Program administration and provides deficit financing to support the insurance fund, in the event damages exceed premiums. An assessment of the successes and challenges of the pilot is underway, including whether this initiative could be expanded.

Operating context: conditions affecting our work

Canada’s diverse agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector is a driver of economic growth, innovation, trade, and investment at home and abroad. A major contributor to the Canadian economy, the sector generated about $108.9 billion in economic activity in 2015, accounting for 6.6 per cent of Canada’s gross domestic product and provided one in eight jobs, employing approximately 2.2 million Canadians (the data sources are Statistics Canada’s CANSIM tables and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada calculations on the Canadian agriculture and agri-food system).

With over half of the value of agricultural production being exported, the growth of the sector is significantly influenced by an increasing global demand for agricultural products, shifting consumer preferences, and access to new and emerging markets as well as continued access to existing markets. Variability in agricultural commodity prices, farm input prices, exchange rates, energy costs, and technological advancements will present challenges and opportunities in the coming years, as will mitigating and adapting to climate change. To address these challenges and seize these opportunities, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada must fully utilise its collaborative relationships with trading partners, and engage with multilateral institutions and partners across the domestic value chain.

Science and innovation are critical to maintaining the profitability, competitiveness, and sustainability of Canada’s agriculture and agri-food sector and are fundamental to Canada’s growth agenda. Increasingly, a collaborative approach is being used across Government, industry and academia to build the necessary scientific capacity to capture key opportunities for the agricultural sector and to accelerate the flow of science and technology in support of industry-defined strategies for future success.

Agriculture plays a key role in meeting the Government commitments of the clean growth and climate change agenda. The next agricultural policy framework will build on previous frameworks to address agri-environmental issues like soil and water conservation, with an enhanced focus on climate change mitigation and adaptation. The development and adoption of clean technologies will support the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and create opportunities for job creation and economic growth. For instance, the agri-based bioproduct sector, including biofuels, will play a key role in the development of clean technologies and their use in other sectors, including the transportation sector.

Ensuring alignment with the external environment is key to sector performance. Through extensive, ongoing consultation and engagement with industry and other Canadians including youth, women and indigenous Canadians, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada strives to ensure that programs and services reflect the needs and expectations of the sector in the context of current risks and opportunities.

Canada 150 video: It's just the beginning

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is proud to contribute to Canada 150 in a unique way by producing a video showcasing modern high-tech agriculture technology. Shot in part from a drone, the video shows a combine guided by Global Positioning System data, cutting the Canada 150 logo in a wheat field in Wilcox, Saskatchewan. Positive and heartfelt, the video touches the four themes of the Canada 150 celebrations: Reconciliation, Diversity, Environment and Youth.

Key risks: things that could affect our ability to achieve plans and results

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada applies a comprehensive approach to identify, assess and respond to risks that could affect the Department’s ability to deliver on its mandate. This includes monitoring the operating environment through environmental scanning and identifying both external and internal factors that may impact the agriculture and agri-food sector and the achievement of departmental objectives. The Corporate Risk Profile is revisited annually to ensure that the corporate risks are well documented and the appropriate responses to them are identified for the coming year.

For the 2017–18 fiscal year, three areas that carry the highest risk to the Department both in terms of likelihood and impact are (1) catastrophic crisis; (2) information management and technology; and, (3) security of sensitive assets.

Catastrophic Crisis

Canada’s agricultural operating environment is rapidly evolving and the factors that can lead to emergencies are complex and diverse. Some key factors influencing this changing operating environment include, but are not limited to: demographic shifts and changing global trade patterns; climate change; increasing consolidation, concentration and integration of the Canadian agriculture sector; and, technological changes and advancements. As a result, there is the potential for emergency events to have significant implications that go beyond economic concerns (for example, impacts to the environment and human health and loss of public trust).

Federal, provincial and territorial governments are working together to protect Canada’s agricultural resources and to improve current emergency management practices. They are collaborating with industry to develop tools and approaches to help prevent or lessen the impact of, prepare for, respond to and recover from agricultural emergencies. To support these efforts, in July 2016, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture endorsed the Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture in Canada at their annual meeting. The Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture in Canada was developed as a foundation for improving Canada's approach to emergency management in agriculture. Ministers also endorsed a Livestock Market Interruption Strategy. This strategy helps governments and the livestock sector prepare for and respond to market interruption emergencies. It was developed by federal, provincial and territorial governments along with the industry.

Information Management and Technology

Information is the cornerstone of a democratic, effective, and accountable government. Therefore, information must be well managed throughout its life cycle, allowing for an effective and responsive government. Stewardship of information and technology is critical in meeting client needs and expectations both internal and external to government.

While focus continues on the standardization and consolidation of information management and technology services and technologies, as well as addressing aging systems this may limit resources and the Department’s ability to meet emerging requirements. A responsive information management and technology environment is key to supporting the work at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and any compromise to this environment could impact the Department’s ability to deliver on its mandate.

Security of Sensitive Assets

Given the surge in cyber security threats and the Department’s need to protect its sensitive assets, there is a risk that these assets could be impacted by cyber threats. The consequences of such breaches could disrupt the work of the Department. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to work with partners in the Government of Canada in a concerted effort to address evolving threats and ensure the implementation of appropriate measures.

The following table provides an overview of the external corporate risks and opportunity that are driven by factors outside of the Department's control, the associated response strategies and link to programs and priorities.

Key risks
Risks Risk response strategy Link to the department’s Programs Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities

Catastrophic Crisis

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s capacity to prepare for and respond to catastrophic crises affecting the industry, including those related to natural and accidental hazards, may have consequences for the agriculture, agri-based and agri-food sector, and/or to Canadians.

Continue engagement activities with federal, provincial and territorial partners for the Emergency Management Framework for Agriculture.

Enhance tools to support a comprehensive emergency management approach, including the implementation of the Livestock Market Interruption Strategy and the development of an Emergency Management Program Plan.

The risks are manageable within existing resources and capacity. They also are considered tolerable given the response strategies being implemented. The response strategies will be monitored to reduce possible threats and will be reported on semi-annually to gauge their effectiveness and to inform priority-setting and decision-making.

All programs All departmental mandate letter commitments and priorities

Information Management and Technology

There is a risk that the progressive standardization and consolidation of information management and technology services and technologies, as well as the aging systems environment, may impede the delivery of programs and services, as well as the speed in delivering innovative solutions to meet emerging requirements for business efficiencies.

Implement measures to enhance and modernize the information management and technology environment to improve performance and capabilities in essential services.

Improve the identification and prioritization of investments to address the emerging program requirements and trends in technologies.

The risks are manageable within existing resources and capacity. They also are considered tolerable given the response strategies being implemented. The response strategies will be monitored to reduce possible threats and will be reported on semi-annually to gauge their effectiveness and to inform priority-setting and decision-making.

All programs All departmental mandate letter commitments and priorities

Security of Sensitive Assets

There is a risk that sensitive Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada assets could be impacted by cyber threats, capabilities/controls limitations and/or limited awareness of established procedures.

Expand Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s environment to securing classified information and enhance security policy instruments.

Increase mandatory training and awareness for employees.

The risks are manageable within existing resources and capacity. They also are considered tolerable given the response strategies being implemented. The response strategies will be monitored to reduce possible threats and will be reported against semi-annually to gauge their effectiveness and to inform priority setting and decision making.

All programs All departmental mandate letter commitments and priorities

Experimentation at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

As part of service modernization, the Department recently worked with a government Service Lab on a collaborative thinking session to improve the design and delivery of AgriScience Clusters Programming (clusters let industry-led agriculture organizations mobilize scientific resources to support sector innovation, profitability and competitiveness). Clusters receive contribution funding to collaborate with academia, government and industry to further research and innovation in agriculture and agri-food. Cluster leads, along with departmental staff, university researchers, and other government departments were invited to co-create new approaches to streamlining application requirements, financial reporting and performance and results reporting.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Programs

Program 1.1: Business Risk Management

Description: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has a comprehensive suite of Business Risk Management programs to better equip producers with the tools and capacity to manage business risks. This suite provides support for income losses, a disaster-relief framework and insurance to protect farmers against production losses due to uncontrollable natural hazards, as well as research, development, implementation, and administration of new agricultural risk management tools. In addition to the Business Risk Management suite, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides producers with the ability to market their products when conditions and prices may be more favourable through loan guarantee programs.

Planning highlights - Program 1.1: Business Risk Management

In 2017–18, federal, provincial and territorial governments will continue to provide a comprehensive suite of Business Risk Management programs under Growing Forward 2, including AgriStability, AgriInvest and AgriInsurance programs, as well as the AgriRecovery Framework. The suite provides support for income losses, insurance to protect farmers against production losses due to uncontrollable natural hazards and a disaster relief framework.

The federal government will continue to support the research, development and implementation of new risk management tools through the AgriRisk Initiatives program. Assistance will include support for the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program in the western provinces.

The federal government will also continue to provide producers with the following complementary loan-guarantee programs: the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act program, the Advance Payments Program and the Price Pooling Program.

In July 2016, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers met to establish the overarching objectives and determine the priority areas for the next agricultural policy framework. Through the Calgary Statement, Ministers agreed to six priority areas, one of which was risk management to ensure that producers continue to have a suite of Business Risk Management programs that is comprehensive in scope and effective in helping manage the impacts of production losses, severe market volatility, extreme events and disasters while improving participation, timeliness, simplicity and predictability.

Federal, provincial and territorial governments provided opportunities for industry to comment on the Business Risk Management suite of programs in preparation for the next agricultural policy framework, and will continue this engagement in 2017–18. While there have been discussions on the entire suite, the focus has been on increasing the participation under AgriStability to ensure it remains an effective risk management tool. Federal, provincial, and territorial governments expect to reach agreement on program direction in 2017–18, with full implementation of Business Risk Management programming under the next policy framework by April 1, 2018.

Planned results Program 1.1: Business Risk Management
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Producers' income losses are reduced The current year producers' net market income plus Business Risk Management program payments as a percent of the previous five year average 85 March 31, 2018 132 118 Not available
Producers' income losses are reduced Percentage of producers considering the Business Risk Management suite of programs as an effective tool to manage risks 70 March 31, 2018 Not applicable 72
(Measured once per framework. Survey conducted in 2013)
72
(Measured once per framework. Survey conducted in 2013)
Producers' income losses are reduced Percentage of producers who are satisfied with the delivery of Business Risk Management programs 70 March 31, 2018 Not applicable Progress to date indicates the target will be achieved Indicator to be measured through 2017 survey

Note: Actual results for 2013–14 are not applicable as the expected results were introduced in 2014‒15. Performance indicators for Business Risk Management programs have a two year lag time; therefore 2015‒16 results will not be available until fall 2017.

The first performance indicator measures the ability of Business Risk Management programs to help stabilize incomes over time. This is calculated by looking at the net market income and Business Risk Management programs of the previous five years' average. The 2013‒14 and 2014‒15 Actual Results are higher than the target of 85 because market conditions were stronger, which lead to high net market incomes.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars) Program 1.1: Business Risk Management
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
1,306,311,287 1,306,311,287 664,401,696 664,401,696
Planned spending decreases from 2017–18 to 2018–19 as the Growing Forward 2 policy framework funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor policy framework is being developed and the funding amount is not yet determined.
Human resources (full-time equivalents) Program 1.1: Business Risk Management
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
366 366 366
Growing Forward 2 funding authorities expire at the end of 2017‒18. A successor to the Growing Forward 2 policy framework is being developed and it is anticipated that full-time equivalents will remain stable.

Information on the lower-level programs is available on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s website and in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat InfoBase

Program 1.2: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems

Description: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada supports and equips industry for commercial success in order to maximize the sector’s long-term profitability and competitiveness. In pursuing this objective, and in close collaboration with the Canadian agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada works to enhance access to markets, facilitates industry-led activities aimed at developing international markets and assurance systems, and provides information to help position industry to capitalize on market opportunities both at home and abroad. Assurance systems include systems, standards and tools for food safety, biosecurity, traceability, surveillance, animal welfare, and other market attributes.

Planning highlights - Program 1.2: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems

Recognizing the importance of global markets to the sustained growth and profitability of Canada's agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector, the Department will advance and promote Canada’s agricultural trade interests and support the Government of Canada’s trade agenda to increase and diversify trade and investment. The Department undertakes a number of activities to contribute to a predictable and stable trade environment by maintaining and expanding access to key markets, defending and advancing Canada’s agricultural trade interests including in the context of trade negotiations; and, advocating for science-based rules and regulations internationally. Additional activities include the negotiation, ratification and implementation of trade agreements and ensuring the sector is able to seize opportunities gained by improved market access. Engagement with the dairy sector will inform the development of two new programs (with up to $350 million in funding) to support the competitiveness of the dairy processing and dairy on-farm sectors, in anticipation of the entry into force of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement.

The Department will undertake key sectoral development activities, while supporting the development of assurance systems and standards. In partnership with provinces and territories, the Department will help the sector compete by providing market information, research, analysis, and policy advice.

The Department will continue to support value chain roundtables as the key industry-government forum to engage on innovation and competitiveness opportunities with key commodities within the agriculture sector.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada continually strives to strengthen market access, market development and domestic sector development activities being delivered under Growing Forward 2. This includes ongoing improvements to performance reporting, to ensure the full scope of activities and successes is captured in an efficient and consistent manner, and continue to strengthen the Department performance and activities.

Third Global Minor Use Summit

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will host the Third Global Minor Use Summit in 2017. The Summit, with participants from over 40 countries, will emphasize global collaborations to resolve issues and help specialty crop growers (fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits and horticulture and nursery crops, including floriculture) access safe, modern tools, and more environmentally friendly and efficient products, to help them produce their crops, and facilitate trade among nations.

To help Canadian growers protect their crops from pests like spotted wing drosophila, and diseases like Fusarium Head Blight (a serious disease of cereal grains), the Department will help develop technologies and techniques aimed at effectively fighting pests while also reducing risks of pesticides to the environment and human health. The Department will work with industry and regulatory agencies, at home and abroad, to produce scientific data that is shared with Health Canada to help streamline the regulatory process for determining the safety and acceptability of new pesticide uses. To enhance sector competitiveness the Department works collaboratively with global partners to obtain equivalent access for Canadian growers to new pest control options. New pest controls help growers to access and compete in global markets, which will lead to increased exports, greater profitability and more jobs for Canadians.

Planned results - Program 1.2: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector is responsive to market opportunities and risks

Value in total exports of agriculture and agri-food (including seafood) (billions of dollars)

Baseline in 2014–15: $56.4 billion

56.4 December 31, 2017 Not applicable $56.4 billion in 2014; a 12% increase from 2013 $61.6 billion in 2015; a 9.1% increase from 2014

Note: Actual results for 2013‒14 are not applicable as a new expected result was introduced in 2014–15.

The Department achieved and surpassed the target of $56.4 billion in exports in 2014–15 and in 2015–16. The increased value is due to both higher prices and volume relative to 2014–15.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars) - Program 1.2: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
173,414,582 173,414,582 32,424,669 32,592,193
Planned spending decreases from 2017–18 to 2018–19 as the Growing Forward 2 policy framework funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor policy framework is being developed and the funding amount is not yet determined.
Human resources (full-time equivalents) - Program 1.2: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
407 407 407
Growing Forward 2 funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor to the Growing Forward 2 policy framework is being developed and it is anticipated that full-time equivalents will remain stable.

Information on the lower-level programs is available on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s website and in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat InfoBase.

Program 1.3: Farm Products Council of Canada

Description: Established under the Farm Products Agencies Act, the Farm Products Council of Canada is an oversight body that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (the Minister). The Farm Products Agencies Act provides for the creation of national marketing agencies, which are not subject to the Competition Act, as well as promotion and research agencies. The Farm Products Council of Canada supervises these agencies, and works with them to ensure that the supply management system for poultry and eggs and promotion-research activities for beef cattle work in the balanced interest of all stakeholders, from producers to consumers, and can evolve to respond to current and future challenges. The Farm Products Council of Canada also provides advice and recommendations to the Minister, collaborates with provincial supervisory boards and actively works with the Department and Agriculture and Agri-Food Portfolio organizations.

Planning highlights - Program 1.3: Farm Products Council of Canada

The Farm Products Council of Canada (the Council) will continue to advance its legislative and regulatory priorities as stated in its 2015‒2018 Strategic Plan (external PDF). The Council will ensure that marketing agencies continue to operate within their regulatory framework and maintain and promote an efficient and competitive agriculture industry. The Council will pursue its work with marketing agencies to establish a public reporting mechanism. Working with provincial supervisory boards, the Council will continue to maintain good relationships with its provincial counterparts, favouring a strong and open dialogue. The Council will continue to engage commodity groups and share information on promotion and research agencies. It will also continue to work with provincial commodity boards, to ensure that those which have a Delegation Order under the Agricultural Products Marketing Act are aware of their obligations and are appropriately using those authorities.

Planned results - Program 1.3: Farm Products Council of Canada
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15 Actual
results
2015–16 Actual
results
All orders and regulations received are reviewed by the Farm Products Council of Canada in a timely manner as per the Farm Products Agencies Act paragraph 7.(1)(d) Percentage of orders and regulations received that are reviewed within six months of receipt 95 March 31, 2018 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
All orders and regulations received are reviewed by Farm Products Council of Canada as per Farm Products Agencies Act paragraph 7.(1)(e) Percentage of orders and regulations received that are reviewed within six months of receipt 95 March 31, 2018 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
The Farm Products Council of Canada processes complaints received from any person who is directly affected by the operations of an agency as per Farm Products Agencies Act paragraph 7.(1)(f) Average processing time 12 months March 31, 2018 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Farm Products Council of Canada holds public hearings if: an inquiry into the merits of establishing an agency is needed; if Council reviews a proposed marketing plan or research and promotion plan; if the Governor in Council or the Minister directs the Council to hold public hearing. As per Farm Products Agencies Act paragraph 8 Average processing time 12 months March 31, 2018 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Note: Actual results for 2013–14, 2014–15 and 2015–16 are not applicable as the expected results are introduced for 2017–18.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) - Program 1.3: Farm Products Council of Canada
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
3,008,456 3,008,456 3,008,456 3,008,456
Human resources (full-time equivalents) - Program 1.3: Farm Products Council of Canada
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
26 26 26

Information on this program, under the name National Farm Products Council, is available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat InfoBase.

Program 2.1: Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability

Description: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada contributes to innovation and sustainability of the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector through science and associated activities designed to improve profitability in new and existing products, services, processes, and markets. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides research, development and knowledge transfer that enhance the sector’s resiliency, foster new areas of opportunity for the sector and support sector competitiveness, as well as coordinated and informed decision making. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada promotes integrated planning, engaging industry, government and academia, and collaborative action to accelerate the flow of science and technology along the innovation continuum in support of industry-defined strategies for future success. Farmers, agri-entrepreneurs and agri-based enterprises are supported in their efforts to adopt new technologies and commercialize new products and services. Pathfinding and transformational research help to define future sustainable opportunities and prepare the sector for emerging opportunities and challenges.

Planning highlights Program 2.1: Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada-led science, research and development will help achieve a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing the sector and the transformation of scientific knowledge into agricultural products, processes and practices that the sector can use to improve its competitiveness, sustainability and profitability. The Department will continue to allocate resources to discovery research that supports the productivity and efficiency of the sector. The Department’s research and knowledge transfer activities will assist the sector to seize market opportunities, develop products with attributes to meet consumer needs and use science-based information to maintain and access markets.

The Department will work with provinces and stakeholders to help enhance the sharing of information and technology, avoid duplication of efforts in research and innovation, and focus investments on priority areas. To ensure that science capacity is maximized and focused on supporting the needs of the agricultural sector, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will work with the sector, academia and other federal, provincial and territorial governments to better coordinate research, development and knowledge transfer activities and to identify the necessary science-related skill sets required to position the sector for success in the future.

In 2017–18, the Department will continue to support industry-led research specific to the needs of the agricultural sector through the Agri-Science Projects and Agri-Science Clusters under the Growing Forward 2 AgriInnovation Program initiatives that include work by departmental researchers for and with the sector, as well as government funding contribution to industry. These initiatives support pre-commercialization research, development and knowledge transfer leading to innovation. Activities under the Enabling Commercialization and Adoption stream will continue to accelerate the demonstration, commercialization and/or adoption of innovative agri-based products, technologies, processes, or services to increase sector competitiveness.

The Department will deliver on the Budget 2016 commitment to support advanced research in agricultural genomics. This commitment to invest in specialized equipment and expertise will accelerate the DNA analysis and digital recording of the Department’s physical collections (specimens including vascular plants, fungi, bacteria and invertebrates such as insects, arachnids and nematodes). It will support research in priority areas, including climate change and the rapid identification and prevention of biological threats to Canada’s agricultural production which can impact Canada’s exports. The Department will data capture 1,690,000 objects; capture 700,000 high resolution images; and, data sequence 23,565 objects. This initiative will provide valuable information in support of Canada’s export markets and help protect Canada’s food supply from pests and diseases. The integration and public release of a significant portion of the Department’s collections data will be an important resource available from Canada's digital infrastructure, enabling sophisticated analysis and the development of scientific predictive models related to climate change and disease and pest management.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will update its science sector strategies to reflect the Minister’s mandate letter commitments, support sector innovation in areas including clean technologies as well as addressing environmental and climate change opportunities and challenges. The science sector strategies outline the Department’s objectives and focus areas for research, development and transfer, provide a framework for scientists to propose areas of work, and describe the role played in relation to, and in collaboration with, other organizations.

The Department will build upon the collaborative research proposals under development with other government departments, academia and the sector, to support the development of clean technologies and reduce Canada’s agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.

Planned results - Program 2.1: Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Agriculture and agri-food sector that utilizes science to improve agriculture’s efficiency, increase availability of new products and contribute to the Canadian economy

Agriculture Net value-added (billions of dollars)

The agriculture value-added account is designed to provide an annual measure of the value of income generated from the production of agricultural goods and services. The numbers are used to assess the state of the agricultural industry and to form the basis of various policy options

12.3 March 31, 2018 Not applicable

13.9
(for the calendar year ended 2014)

Note: Estimate is based on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada calculation of Statistics Canada farm cash receipts and net income release

17.4
(for the calendar year ended 2015)

Note: Actual results for 2013–14 is not applicable as a new performance indicator was introduced in 2014‒15.

The sizable increase to the net value-added for 2015 as compared to the 2014 Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada calculation can be attributed to the increase in the value of production. Changes to the factors of production (for example, expenses, depreciation and inventories) can have a great effect to net effect on value added. Over the past few years the value of production has grown at a faster rate than expenses, leading to growth in value added from the sector. This has been due to in part to increased production for some higher value crops, and overall yield/production growth in the crops and livestock sectors. This growth took place at a time when the Canada‒United States exchange rate was favorable, helping to keep prices in Canada favorable while global commodity prices had softened.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars) - Program 2.1: Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
563,745,548 563,745,548 296,694,102 292,790,893
Planned spending decreases from 2017–18 to 2018–19 as the Growing Forward 2 policy framework funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor policy framework is being developed and the funding amount is not yet determined. The decreases also reflect the expiry of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative at the end of 2017‒18 and the expiry of the Genomics Research and Development Initiative at the end of 2018–19.
Human resources (full-time equivalents) - Program 2.1: Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2,556 2,567 2,567
The increase in planned full-time equivalents from 2017–18 to 2018–19 is in support of the genomics, digitization and data mobilization of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s biological collections as announced in Budget 2016. Growing Forward 2 funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor to the Growing Forward 2 policy framework is being developed and it is anticipated that full-time equivalents will remain stable.

Information on the lower-level programs is available on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s website and in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat InfoBase .

Strengthening Environmental Research in Agriculture

Minister Lawrence MacAulay has announced that Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will reopen the Frelighsburg Experimental Farm in Quebec beginning spring 2017. The Farm will be home to world-class research that will focus on the development of new, clean technologies to help protect Canada's water and soil resources and help producers continue to farm in an environmentally sustainable manner. Researchers will develop new techniques and tools in biovigilance (allowing them to detect and prevent biological threats to crops), precision farming, and crop management.

Program 2.2: Industry Capacity

Description: This program helps build the capacity of the sector and businesses to sustainably succeed in a market-driven and competitive world. The program encourages the use of sound business management practices, while also enabling businesses in the sector to understand their financial situation, be profitable and invest where needed. It provides for enhanced participation by young or new entrants, First Nations clients, and clients in specific sub-sectors in transition. The program also supports the sector and its businesses to improve access to key infrastructure.

Planning highlights - Program 2.2: Industry Capacity

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will continue to help the sector and businesses succeed over time by encouraging sound business-management practices. The Department will enable businesses to understand their financial situations, be profitable and invest where needed. For example, in accordance with the Farm Debt Mediation Act the Industry Capacity program will continue to provide its Farm Debt Mediation Service to farmers experiencing financial difficulties and their creditors to help arrive at mutually satisfactory arrangements.

Planned results - Program 2.2: Industry Capacity
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
The sector is increasing its ability to be resilient and self-sustaining Maintain and/or increase the percentage of farms with high free cash flow 55 March 31, 2028 Not applicable

58

Source: Statistics Canada, Farm Financial Survey 2013 and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada calculations

Note: Free cash flow represents available cash after paying farm business expenses including farm debt

58
Note: Actual results for 2013–14 are not applicable as the expected result was introduced was introduced in 2014–15.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)- Program 2.2: Industry Capacity
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
61,514,447 61,514,447 16,949,708 16,949,708
Planned spending decreases from 2017–18 to 2018–19 as the Growing Forward 2 policy framework funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor policy framework is being developed and the funding amount is not yet determined.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)- Program 2.2: Industry Capacity
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
125 66 66
There is a decrease in full-time equivalents in 2018‒19 as the Community Pastures program expires at the end of 2017–18. Growing Forward 2 funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor to the Growing Forward 2 policy framework is being developed and it is anticipated that full-time equivalents will remain stable.

Information on the lower-level programs is available on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s website and in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat InfoBase.

Program 2.3: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency

Description: Section 204 of the Criminal Code of Canada designates the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food responsible for making the regulations that direct the lawful conduct of pari-mutuel betting in Canada on horse racing. The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency is a special operating agency within Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada that approves and supervises pari-mutuel betting conducted at racetracks and betting theatres across Canada, with the objective of ensuring that betting is conducted in a way that is fair to the betting public. Costs associated with the activities of the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency are recovered through a levy on every dollar bet in Canada on horse races. The levy is currently set at eight-tenths of a cent of every dollar bet. Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency's strategic plans are focused on regulating and supervising pari-mutuel betting on horse races in the most modern, effective and transparent manner.

Planning highlights - Program 2.3: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency

The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency will undertake two key initiatives over the next three years, including implementation of an information technology roadmap and modernizing the services provided by the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency’s Reference and Research Laboratory. These plans will leave the Agency well-situated for the ongoing delivery of programs and services that support the Canadian horse racing industry, and ensure that pari-mutuel betting on horse races is conducted in a fair and equitable manner.

An information technology roadmap identifying three core systems has been developed, and the business requirements for these systems are currently being finalized. The systems include a customer relationship management module that will facilitate online applications, a monitoring component that will oversee all authorized betting activity, and an integrated drug control system that will support invoicing by contracted suppliers and investigative activities conducted by Agency Officers. Design, implementation and deployment of the customer relationship management module, the first scheduled project, will commence in 2017–18, with production mode currently expected in 2018–19. Completion of the drug control and monitoring systems and integration of all Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency systems is expected for 2019–20.

The Reference and Research Laboratory is used to establish procedures and protocols applicable to detecting controlled substances in samples collected from race horses. Investment in the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency’s equine drug control program will ensure that the most modern approach is in place for deterring the unauthorized administration of prohibited substances to race horses. Modernization of the laboratory is expected to be complete in 2017–18.

Planned results - Program 2.3: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Pari-mutuel betting is conducted in a way that is fair to the Canadian betting public Percentage of compliance with the Pari-Mutuel Betting Supervision Regulations of Canadian racetracks and betting theatres inspected by Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency officers 100 March 31, 2018

100

There are no outstanding issues of regulatory non-compliance for any pari-mutuel operator licensed by the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency

100

There are no outstanding issues of regulatory non-compliance for any pari-mutuel operator licensed by the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency

100
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) - Program 2.3: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
Gross Planned Spending 10,133,000 10,133,000 10,063,000 10,201,000
Less Respendable Revenue (10,133,000) (10,133,000) (10,082,000) (10,032,000)
Net Planned Spending 0 0 (19,000) 169,000
Human resources (full-time equivalents) - Program 2.3: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
33 33 33

Information on this program is available on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description: Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights - Internal Services

In 2017–18, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will undertake initiatives to support the Department’s ability to deliver on its mandate and deliver results to Canadians. Specifically, the Department will focus on the following:

Service modernization - Internal Services

Improving service delivery is a key departmental management priority. Through its Service Modernization Strategy, the Department supports more timely, client-centric, user-friendly digitally-enabled services and achievement of quality by:

  • implementing process improvements to ensure timely delivery of information, programs and services;
  • employing a greater variety of tools to solicit external client feedback to program policy, design and delivery, and service improvement;
  • leveraging digital technology to improve ease of use and access to program and services across service channels (phone, web); and
  • using business intelligence tools that support better decision making and focus attention on achieving the best outcomes for the agricultural sector.
Results and delivery

The Government of Canada’s Results Agenda focuses on actions that will deliver real results to Canadians through strong performance measurement to report progress, evidence-based decision making and feedback and dialogue with Canadians for meaningful impact. To support the Government’s commitment, the Department will implement a results and delivery framework to track and report progress and assess the effectiveness of the work; and ensure that resources are aligned with Government of Canada priorities to deliver results for Canadians.

Information Management and Information Technology

In 2017–18, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will adopt a service strategy that delivers more online services to Canadians, and will continue to advance the release of data and information resources for accessibility and reusability by the public. The Department will also continue to support the implementation of Government of Canada enterprise solutions.

The Department’s Information Management and Information Technology Strategic Plan will be implemented to modernize systems, tools and improve business efficiencies. This includes enhancing data management to strengthen decision making and results measurements.

Promoting a healthy, inclusive and respectful work environment with a focus on wellness and mental health

The Department recognizes the value and importance of promoting and maintaining a healthy, inclusive and respectful workplace. To foster the work environment required to achieve results, an action plan will be developed to respond to the results of the 2017 annual and tri-annual Public Service Employee Surveys with an emphasis on addressing mental and workplace health issues. The Department will also renew its Diversity and Inclusiveness Plan while ensuring key considerations are factored into applicable human resources programs, policies, and processes.

Blueprint 2020

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Blueprint 2020 activities support Public Service Renewal and the Government of Canada’s Results Agenda to continuously improve delivery of programs and services. The Department’s Sowing Seeds of Possibilities ‒ Public Service Renewal 2016 Report showcases the significant actions undertaken which include over 300 employees participating in interactive workshops to strengthen leadership at all levels. As well, a third process improvement training course was initiated with participants from nearly all Branches.

The Report will be used as a tool to continue the Blueprint 2020 dialogue with employees to further strengthen our leadership and continuous improvement cultures to better serve Canadians.

Additional examples of Lean processes within the Department include:

  • Streamlining the Access to Information process

    Under the Access to Information Act, the Department is obliged to respond to an Access to Information request within 30 calendar days. Should additional time be required to complete it, the requestor is notified accordingly.

    Through process mapping, a departmental Lean facilitator identified the opportunity to:

    1. enhance the clarity of requests at the outset;
    2. reduce the number and level of approvals;
    3. improve the level of knowledge by providing training about Access to Information; and
    4. decrease the administrative burden for simple requests.

    With the implementation of improvements to these areas, it is expected that the process time will be reduced by more than 15% (for example, a request which requires an extension beyond the normal 30 days and takes, on average, 67.63 days to complete, is expected to now be handled in 56.63 days, an 11-day gain in efficiency). The implementation of this lean process has helped increase efficiency while ensuring the appropriate level of scrutiny regarding confidential and sensitive information.

  • Improving the assessment process for funding applications

    Funding amounts under the Small and Medium-sized Enterprise component of the AgriMarketing Program’s Market Development stream are low, with the average value of each project being $18,000. Approval times averaged between 60 and 65 days. The technical review of the applications was not meeting its service standard of 5 days due to multiple touch points, approval times, and re-dissemination. Applications often waited in a batch for presentation to a senior management.

    As a result, a lean process review was undertaken which led to: improved questionnaires and forms, reducing back and forth between applicants and program officers; centralized intake for technical reviews in order to meet the 5 day service standard; and subsequently removed the review stage, further streamlining the application process. These improvements brought the process down from 60-65 days, to 30 days, resulting in significant internal savings.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars) - Internal Services
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
143,189,378 143,189,378 116,978,399 116,664,017
Planned spending decreases from 2017–18 to 2018–19 as the Growing Forward 2 policy framework funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor policy framework is being developed and the funding amount is not yet determined. The decreases also reflect the expiry of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative at the end of 2017–18 and the expiry of the Genomics Research and Development Initiative at the end of 2018–19.
Human resources (full-time equivalents) - Internal Services
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
1,140 1,140 1,140
Growing Forward 2 funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor to the Growing Forward 2 policy framework is being developed and it is anticipated that full-time equivalents will remain stable.
Indigenous Student Recruitment

The Indigenous Student Recruitment Initiative at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada helps Indigenous students gain experience and knowledge of various careers available within the Department, and the public service as a whole. With the assistance of a Department Elder, the Initiative increases awareness, recruitment, and engagement of Indigenous students across Canada. A major focus during 2017 will be to increase the number of Indigenous student hires and the retention of those employees.

Agriculture ‒ then and now!

When the Department was created 150 years ago…Grain was harvested by hand and a farmer could cover 1 acre per day. Today, a harvester combine can cover 150 acres per day.

150 years ago… Cows had to be milked on schedule, by hand, one at a time, twice a day, every day for 6 to 8 months per year. Yield was about 1000 litres per year per cow.  Today, a cow can yield 8,500 litres per year, thanks to the adoption of on-farm technologies such as automated cow traffic control and milking equipment.

150 years ago… Fresh fruits and vegetables could be stored for up to six months in a root cellar, and vegetables were only grown during their season. Today, produce can be kept fresh for up to 12 months in climate controlled storage facilities and grown all year long in greenhouses.

Spending and human resources

Departmental spending trend graph
Description of this image follows.
Description of the Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental Spending Trend (millions of dollars)
2014–151 2015–161 2016–172 2017–183 2018–19 2019–20
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 1,0944 1,0944
Statutory 1,065 950 1,161 1,305 7043 7043
Voted 949 978 1,354 946 4273 4233
Total 2,014 1,928 2,515 2,251 2,224 2,220

1 Spending for 2014–15 and 2015–16 represents the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.

2 Spending for 2016–17 reflects the forecast spending to the end of the fiscal year.

3 Spending for 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. It has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2017. More information will be provided in the 2017–18 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

4 The funding amount for the successor of Growing Forward 2 is not yet determined. The anticipated renewal amount shown in the spending trend graph is based on the current Growing Forward 2 framework and is subject to change.

Over the period 2014–15 to 2019–20, spending varies from a low of $1.9 billion spent in 2015–16 to a high of $2.5 billion forecasted for 2016–17. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's programs and initiatives vary from year to year in response to changes affecting the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector as outlined below.

Actual spending in 2015–16 was low primarily due to strong market conditions which reduced the need for statutory grants and contributions under Business Risk Management, mainly in the AgriStability program. In addition, actual spending reflects $53.8 million of returned funding from the expired statutory contribution program: the Hog Industry Loan Loss Reserve program. These decreases were offset by a higher payment under the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program, as a lump sum payment was provided in order to settle obligations and complete the Program.

Forecast spending in 2016–17 is higher as it reflects one time funding for the transfer of federal water infrastructure to the Government of Saskatchewan, an increase in demand, compared to 2015–16, for statutory grants and contributions for Business Risk Management programs, as well as an increase to the Federal Infrastructure Initiative.

The reduction in planned statutory and voted spending in 2018–19 and 2019–20 reflects the fact that federal authorities will need to be renewed for the suite of statutory Business Risk Management programs and the current Non-Business Risk Management Growing Forward 2 programs and the expiry of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, in consultation with provinces and territories, continues to develop a successor to the Growing Forward 2 policy framework to position the industry to meet challenges ahead. The funding amount for the successor policy framework is not yet determined. The anticipated amount shown in the graph reflects the successor of Growing Forward 2 based on the current policy framework and therefore, is subject to change.

E-commerce platform China

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is developing a world-class Canadian food and beverage presence on an e-commerce platform to support Canadian agri-food exports to China. China's growing population is seeking high-quality imported food products to address their changing preferences and their attention to food safety and authenticity. E-commerce has revolutionized the Chinese marketplace and it continues to grow at an incredible pace.

Planned spending

Budgetary planning summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–15
Expenditures1
2015–16
Expenditures1
2016–17
Forecast spending2
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending3
2018–19
Planned spending3
2019–20
Planned spending3
Program 1.1 Business Risk Management 1,033,315,991 923,685,461 1,149,860,582 1,306,311,287 1,306,311,287 664,401,696 664,401,696
Program 1.2 Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems 163,511,328 198,590,662 163,633,220 173,414,582 173,414,582 32,424,669 32,592,193
Program 1.3 Farm Products Council of Canada 3,032,055 3,087,351 3,094,770 3,008,456 3,008,456 3,008,456 3,008,456
Program 2.1 Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability 575,890,434 600,370,331 633,506,603 563,745,548 563,745,548 296,694,102 292,790,893
Program 2.2 Industry Capacity 76,204,095 50,436,622 404,992,718 61,514,447 61,514,447 16,949,708 16,949,708
Program 2.3 Canadian Pari-Mutual Agency (2,233,091) (962,575) 0 0 0 (19,000) 169,000
Subtotal 1,849,720,812 1,775,207,852 2,355,087,893 2,107,994,320 2,107,994,320 1,013,459,631 1,009,911,946
Internal Services  164,270,556  153,201,740  159,971,728  143,189,378  143,189,378  116,978,399  116,664,017
Total 2,013,991,368 1,928,409,592 2,515,059,621 2,251,183,698 2,251,183,698 1,130,438,030 1,126,575,963

1 Expenditures represents the actual expenditures incurred during the respective fiscal year, as reported in Public Accounts.

2 Forecast spending reflects the forecast expenditures to the end of the fiscal year.

3 Planned spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Department's Annual Reference Level Update. Planned spending has not been adjusted to include new information contained in Budget 2017. More information will be provided in the 2017‒18 Supplementary Estimates, as applicable.

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents1)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–15
Full-time equivalents
2015–16
Full-time equivalents
2016–17
Forecast
full-time equivalents
2017–18
Planned
full-time equivalents
2018–19 Planned
full-time equivalents2
2019–20 Planned
full-time equivalents2
Program 1.1
Business Risk Management
349 361 366 366 366 366
Program 1.2
Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems
372 396 407 407 407 407
Program 1.3
Farm Products Council of Canada
25 25 26 26 26 26
Program 2.1
Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability
2,441 2,439 2,538 2,556 2,567 2,567
Program 2.2
Industry Capacity
227 203 151 125 66 66
Program 2.3
Canadian Pari-Mutual Agency
34 33 33 33 33 33
Subtotal 3,448 3,457 3,521 3,513 3,465 3,465
Internal Services 1,149 1,056 1,130 1,140 1,140 1,140
Total 4,597 4,513 4,651 4,653 4,605 4,605

1 Full-Time Equivalents – reflect only those full-time equivalents funded through the Department's appropriated resources. For example, in 2016–17, there were 15 full-time equivalents employed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for research funded through collaborative agreements with industry partners. Also, an additional 500 full-time equivalents were employed as students.

2 Growing Forward 2 funding authorities expire at the end of 2017–18. A successor to the Growing Forward 2 policy framework is being developed and it is anticipated that full-time equivalents will remain stable.

The decrease in full-time equivalents from 2014–15 to 2015–16 is mainly due to transfers to other government departments to consolidate and transform information technology infrastructure and pay functions across government, in addition to the winding down of the Community Pastures program and attrition.

The increase in forecast full-time equivalents in 2016–17 is mainly due to planned staffing of vacant positions partially offset by a decrease due to the winding down of the Community Pastures program.

The planned increase in full-time equivalents in 2017–18 is mainly due to staff required to support the genomics, digitization and data mobilization of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s biological collections as announced in Budget 2016 under the Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability program.

The planned decrease of full-time equivalents in 2018–19 is mainly due to the winding down of the Community Pastures program at the end of 2017–18. This decrease is offset by a planned increase of staff required to support the genomics, digitization and data mobilization of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s biological collections under the Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability program.

Estimates by vote

For information on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2017–18 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available online.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2016–17
Forecast results
2017–18
Planned results
Difference
(2017–18 Planned results minus 2016–17 Forecast results)
Total expenses 2,594,546,000 2,350,802,000 (243,744,000)
Total revenues 70,958,000 68,480,000 (2,478,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 2,523,588,000 2,282,322,000 (241,266,000)

The net cost of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's operations is projected to be $2.3 billion in 2017‒18, an expected decrease of $241.3 million compared to 2016‒17 estimated results. The decrease is mainly attributed to the Industry Capacity program due to costs associated with the transfer of federal water infrastructure to the Government of Saskatchewan in 2016‒17. This decrease is partially offset by other adjustments and an increase in planned spending for Business Risk Management programs in 2017‒18.

Total expenses are projected to be $2.4 billion in 2017‒18. The majority of these expenses is in the form of transfer payments in Business Risk Management (57.3% or $1.3 billion). Other expenses include $496.5 million (21.1% of total expenses) in Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability and $174 million (7.4%) in Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems.

Total revenues are projected to be $68.5 million for 2017‒18. The majority of these revenues is in the sale of goods and services (73.4% or $69.0 million). Other revenues include $13.5 million in interest (14.4%) and $7.3 million in joint project and cost sharing agreements (7.7%). These revenues are presented net of revenues earned on behalf of government ($25.5 million) in the departmental Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations.

Supplementary information

Corporate Information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay

Institutional head: Andrea Lyon, Deputy Minister

Ministerial portfolio: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Enabling instrument: Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Act, (R.S.C. 1985, c. A-9)

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1994

Agri-Food Trade Commissioner Service

With 36 Trade Commissioners around the world, the Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioner Service complements Global Affairs Canada's Trade Commissioner Service network by providing Canadian agriculture and food companies and organizations with on-the-ground intelligence and advice on foreign markets to help them reach new export markets and expand their business internationally.

Reporting framework

The Department’s Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2017–18 are shown below:

Description of this image follows.
Description of Strategic Outcome 1
  • Strategic Outcome 1: A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk
    • Program 1.1: Business Risk Management
      • Sub-Program 1.1.1: AgriStability
      • Sub-Program 1.1.2: AgriInvest
      • Sub-Program 1.1.3: AgriRecovery
      • Sub-Program 1.1.4: AgriInsurance
      • Sub-Program 1.1.5: AgriRisk Initiatives
      • Sub-Program 1.1.6: Agricultural Marketing Programs Act
      • Sub-Program 1.1.7: Canadian Agricultural Loans Act
    • Program 1.2: Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems
      • Sub-Program 1.2.1: Trade and Market Expansion
      • Sub-Program 1.2.2: Sector Engagement and Development
      • Sub-Program 1.2.3: Market Development
      • Sub-Program 1.2.4: Assurance Systems
      • Sub-Program 1.2.5: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Market Development and Competitiveness
      • Sub-Program 1.2.6: Pest Management: Pesticides Minor Use Program
      • Sub-Program 1.2.7: Pest Management: Pesticides Risk Reduction Program
    • Program 1.3: Farm Products Council of Canada
Description of this image follows
Description of Strategic Outcome 2
  • Strategic Outcome 2: An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector
    • Program 2.1: Science, Innovation, Adoption, and Sustainability
      • Sub-Program 2.1.1: Science Supporting an Innovative and Sustainable Sector
      • Sub-Program 2.1.2: Research Accelerating Innovation
      • Sub-Program 2.1.3: Research, Development and Knowledge Transfer
      • Sub-Program 2.1.4: Enabling Commercialization and Adoption
      • Sub-Program 2.1.5: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Research, Adoption and Commercialization
      • Sub-Program 2.1.6: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Environment
      • Sub-Program 2.1.7: Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program
    • Program 2.2: Industry Capacity
      • Sub-Program 2.2.1: Farm Debt Mediation Service
      • Sub-Program 2.2.2: Fostering Business Development
      • Sub-Program 2.2.3: Federal-Provincial-Territorial Cost-shared Adaptability and Industry Capacity
      • Sub-Program 2.2.4: Community Pastures
      • Sub-Program 2.2.5: Water Infrastructure
      • Sub-Program 2.2.6: Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program
    • Program 2.3: Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency
    • Program 3.1: Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Information on the lower-level programs is available on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s website and in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s website.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Public Information Requests Services
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5

Telephone: 613-773-1000
Toll-free: 1-855-773-0241
Fax: 613-773-1081
Telecommunications Device for the Deaf/Teletype: 613-773-2600
Email: info@agr.gc.ca
Website: www.agr.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

Appropriation (credit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (Plan ministerial)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministerial)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministerial)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
Full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For Ghe purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
Horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
A horizontal initiative is one in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (e.g. by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
Non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
Planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

Plans (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priorities (priorité)
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
Program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
Statutory expenditures (dépenses legislatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
Sunset program (programme temporise)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
Target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
Voted expenditures (dépenses votes)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Alternative Formats

Help with Alternate Formats

2017–18 Departmental Plan (PDF Version, 1,410 KB)

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